Article Archive

These are my posts on Lang-8.

Yubiori Kazoeru (指折り数える - Waiting Eagerly)

Apr 11, 2019 10:50
Yubiori Kazoeru

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'yubiori' (指折り), which means "to count something" or "one of the best."

If you want to mean the former explicitly, you can say 'yubiori kazoeru' (指折り数える).

Since 'yubi' (指) means "finger," 'ori' (折り) means "to bend something," and 'kazoeru' (数える) means "to count something," the literal meaning of 'yubiori kazoeru' is "to count something by bending fingers."

In addition, this phrase can imply that you are looking forward to one day and waiting while counting the remaining days.

[Example] Kekkonshiki no hi wo yubiori kazoete matsu (結婚式の日を指折り数えて待つ - "I wait eagerly for the wedding day.")
指折り数える

昨日は「数を数える」や「特に優れている」ことを意味する「指折り」という言葉を紹介しました。

前者の意味を明示的に表したい場合は、「指折り数える」と言います。

「数える」は "to count something" を意味するので、「指折り数える」は文字どおり "to count something by bending fingers" という意味になります。

また、この表現は特に、ある日が楽しみで一日一日を数えながら待つことを意味することが多いです。

【例文】結婚式の日を指折り数えて待つ。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
  • Yesterday, I introduced the term 'yubiori' (指折り), which means "to count something" or "one of the best."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • If you want to mean the former explicitly, you can say 'yubiori kazoeru' (指折り数える).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since 'yubi' (指) means "finger," 'ori' (折り) means "to bend something," and 'kazoeru' (数える) means "to count something," the literal meaning of 'yubiori kazoeru' is "to count something by bending fingers."
  • Since 'yubi' (指) means "finger," 'ori' (折り) means "to bend something," and 'kazoeru' (数える) means "to count something," the literal meaning of 'yubiori kazoeru' is "to count something by bending your fingers."
     You're not talking about someone else's fingers are you? ;-)
  • In addition, this phrase can imply that you are looking forward to one day and waiting while counting the remaining days.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • [Example] Kekkonshiki no hi wo yubiori kazoete matsu (結婚式の日を指折り数えて待つ - "I wait eagerly for the wedding day.")
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting me!
> You're not talking about someone else's fingers are you? ;-)
Yes, how true! :)

Yubiori (指折り - One of the Best)

Apr 10, 2019 22:42
Yubiori

Human beings sometimes bend their fingers one by one when counting something.

To count something by bending fingers is referred to as 'yubiori' (指折り) or 'yubi wo oru' (指を折る) in Japanese.

Literally, 'yubi' (指) means "finger" and 'ori/oru' (折る) means "to bend something" or "to fold something."

However, this term has another meaning -- it is "one of the best," because you can count the top five on your one hand fingers.

[Example] 'Kare wa nihon de yubiori no pianisuto da' (彼は日本で指折りのピアニストだ - "He is one of the best pianists in Japan").
指折り

人間は何かの数を数えるとき、手の指を順番に折り曲げていくことがあります。

指を折り曲げながら数えることを、日本語で「指折り」もしくは「指を折る」と言います。

文字どおり、「指」は "finger"、「折り/折る」は "to bend" を意味します。

しかし、「指折り/指を折る」にはもう一つ、「数多くある中で、特に指を折って数えられるほど優れている」という意味もあります。

【例文】彼は日本で指折りのピアニストだ。
No. 1 green's correction
>>指折りのピアニストだ
thanks Toruさん, very helpful. one of the best five in jp!
Toru
Thank you for the nice comment! (^^)
No. 2 rebarnes22's correction
  • Human beings sometimes bend their fingers one by one when counting something.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • To count something by bending fingers is referred to as 'yubiori' (指折り) or 'yubi wo oru' (指を折る) in Japanese.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Literally, 'yubi' (指) means "finger" and 'ori/oru' (折る) means "to bend something" or "to fold something."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • However, this term has another meaning -- it is "one of the best," because you can count the top five on your one hand fingers.
  • However, this term has another meaning -- it is "one of the best," because you can count the top five on your the fingers of one hand fingers.
Interesting entry.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

On ni Kiseru/On wo Uru (恩に着せる/恩を売る - Making You Feel Grateful)

Apr 9, 2019 13:53
On ni Kiseru/On wo Uru

Yesterday, I introduced the phrase 'on wo ada de kaesu' (恩を仇で返す), which means to bite the hand that feeds you.

There are other idioms that use 'on' (恩 - "favor"), such as 'on ni kiseru' (恩に着せる) or 'on wo uru' (恩を売る).

Since 'kiseru' (着せる) means "to make/have someone wear something" and 'uru' (売る) means "to sell something," the literal meanings of 'on ni kiseru' and 'on wo uru' are "to make someone wear one's favors" and "to sell one's favors," respectively.

Here, 'kiseru' and 'uru' imply that you force something against someone.

That is to say, these idioms mean to act to force someone to feel one's favors.
恩に着せる/恩を売る

昨日は「恩を仇で返す」という表現を紹介しました。

「恩」を使った表現には、他に「恩に着せる」や「恩を売る」などがあります。

「恩」は "favor"、「着せる」は "to make someone wear something"、「売る」は "to sell something" を意味するので、「恩に着せる」と「恩を売る」の文字どおりの意味は、それぞれ "to make someone wear one's favors" と "to sell one's favors" になります。

ここで、「着せる」や「売る」は、「相手に何かを押し付ける」ことを表しています。

すなわちこれらの慣用句は、相手に恩を感じさせるよう行動することを意味するわけです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
  • On ni Kiseru/On wo Uru (恩に着せる/恩を売る - Making You Feel Grateful)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Yesterday, I introduced the phrase 'on wo ada de kaesu' (恩を仇で返す), which means to bite the hand that feeds you.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • There are other idioms that use 'on' (恩 - "favor"), such as 'on ni kiseru' (恩に着せる) or 'on wo uru' (恩を売る).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since 'kiseru' (着せる) means "to make/have someone wear something" and 'uru' (売る) means "to sell something," the literal meanings of 'on ni kiseru' and 'on wo uru' are "to make someone wear one's favors" and "to sell one's favors," respectively.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Here, 'kiseru' and 'uru' imply that you force something against someone.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • That is to say, these idioms mean to act to force someone to feel one's favors.
  • That is to say, these idioms mean to make someone feel indebted to you.
     Is this right? "feel one's favors" sounds strange.
That's an interesting turn of phrase. I don't think we have a perfect English equivalent.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post again!
> Is this right?
Yes, "make someone feel indebted to you" is what I wanted to say! :)

On wo Ada de Kaesu (恩を仇で返す - Biting the Hand that Feeds One)

Apr 8, 2019 10:40
On wo Ada de Kaesu

Have you ever done harm to someone without a feeling of gratitude, even though he/she took care of you?
(I would like you to say "No.")

Such an action is called 'on wo ada de kaesu' (恩を仇で返す) in Japanese.

'On' (恩) means "favor," 'ada' (仇) means "harm," and 'kaesu' (返す) means "to return," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "to do harm as a return of favors."

For example, you can use it to describe a scene that a child betrays his/her parents who have cherished the child.
恩を仇で返す

恩を受けたにも関わらず、感謝するどころか、害を加えるようなことをした経験はありますか?
(「ない」と言ってほしいです。)

そのような行為のことを、「恩を仇で返す」と言います。

「恩」は "favor"、「仇」は "harm"、「返す」は "to return" を意味するので、「恩を仇で返す」の文字どおりの意味は "to do harm as a return of favors" となります。

例えば、大事に育ててくれた両親を裏切る行為などを表現する際に使うことができます。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
  • On wo Ada de Kaesu (恩を仇で返す - Biting the Hand that Feeds One)
  • On wo Ada de Kaesu (恩を仇で返す - Biting the Hand that Feeds One/You)
     "You" would be a little more common
  • Have you ever done harm to someone without a feeling of gratitude, even though he/she took care of you?
  • Have you ever returned someone's kindness by doing harm to them rather than being thankful?
     "doing harm without gratitude" doesn't sound right because in normal circumstances it would be very odd to feel gratitude while doing harm.
  • (I would like you to say "No.")
  • (I hope the answer is "no".)
     More natural
  • Such an action is called 'on wo ada de kaesu' (恩を仇で返す) in Japanese.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • For example, you can use it to describe a scene that a child betrays his/her parents who have cherished the child.
  • For example, you can use it to describe a scene that a child betrays their parents who have cherished them.
     I recommend using the singular "they" here. "his/her" sounds very clunky, so does repeating the word "child". If you want to use gendered language, it's better to choose one or the other.
Amop567
  • For example, you can use it to describe a scene that a child betrays their parents who have cherished them.

    I recommend using the singular "they" here. "his/her" sounds very clunky, so does repeating the word "child". If you want to use gendered language, it's better to choose one or the other.

...that a child...→...in which a child...
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations! :)

Ice Cream and Shaved Ice

Apr 7, 2019 15:17
Ice Cream and Shaved Ice

Yesterday, I talked about 'kaki gōri' (かき氷), which means "shaved ice."

Which do you think is "ice cream" or "shaved ice" colder?

Ice cream is around -7 degrees Celsius, whereas shaved ice is 0 degrees Celsius.

However, I think that many people feel that shaved ice is colder than ice cream.

Since milk fat and air bubbles that are contained in ice cream do not transfer heat well, shaved ice can draw heat away from your mouth faster than ice cream.

It is getting warmer lately, so I would like to eat either one.
アイスクリームとかき氷

昨日は「かき氷」について紹介しました。

「アイスクリーム」と「かき氷」は、どちらが冷たいと思いますか?

かき氷は0℃であるのに対して、アイスクリームは-7℃程度です。

しかし実際には、かき氷のほうが冷たいと考える人も多いと思います。

アイスクリームに含まれる脂肪や空気の泡が熱を伝えにくいため、口の中の熱を奪う速度はかき氷のほうが早いというわけです。

最近暖かくなってきたので、どちらでも良いから食べたいです。
No. 1 Ashtyn's correction
  • Ice Cream and Shaved Ice
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Ice Cream and Shaved Ice
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Which do you think is "ice cream" or "shaved ice" colder?
  • Which do you think wouldis be colder: "ice cream" or "shaved ice" colder?
  • Ice cream is around -7 degrees Celsius, whereas shaved ice is 0 degrees Celsius.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • However, I think that many people feel that shaved ice is colder than ice cream.
  • However, I think that many people pferceivel that shaved ice is colder than ice cream.
  • Since milk fat and air bubbles that are contained in ice cream do not transfer heat well, shaved ice can draw heat away from your mouth faster than ice cream.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • It is getting warmer lately, so I would like to eat either one.
  • It ihas been getting warmer lately, so I would like to eat either one.
Very interesting! I have never thought about that before. Are you a food scientist? Also, nice English!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I am a scientist, but my major is engineering, haha.

Kakigōri (かき氷 - Shaved Ice)

Apr 6, 2019 13:56
Kakigōri

Have you ever eaten 'kakigōri' (かき氷)?

Kakigōri is a kind of frozen sweets made from finely shaved or crushed ice flavored with syrup, etc., and is one of the traditional Japanese features of summer.
(Of course, many other countries also have similar traditions.)

'Gōri/kōri' (氷) means "ice," but there are several theories about the etymology of 'kaki' (かき).

One theory says that it comes from the fact that we used 'kaketa kōri' (欠けた氷 - literally means "chipped ice") to make 'kakigōri'.

In English, it is often translated as "shaved ice."
かき氷

「かき氷」を食べたことはありますか?

「かき氷」とは、細かく削るか砕いた氷にシロップ等をかけた氷菓のことで、日本の夏の風物詩の一つとなっています。
(もちろん海外にも同様の食べ物があります。)

「氷」は "ice" を意味しますが、「かき」の由来には幾つかの説があります。

ある説では、「欠けた氷を使ったため」と説明しています。

英語ではよく "shaved ice" と訳されます。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
  • Have you ever eaten 'kakigōri' (かき氷)?
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Kakigōri is a kind of frozen sweets made from finely shaved or crushed ice flavored with syrup, etc., and is one of the traditional Japanese features of summer.
  • Kakigōri is a kind of frozen sweet made from finely shaved or crushed ice flavored with syrup, etc., and is one of the traditional Japanese features of summer.
  • (Of course, many other countries also have similar traditions.)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Gōri/kōri' (氷) means "ice," but there are several theories about the etymology of 'kaki' (かき).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • One theory says that it comes from the fact that we used 'kaketa kōri' (欠けた氷 - literally means "chipped ice") to make 'kakigōri'.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In English, it is often translated as "shaved ice."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
I've had shaved ice before here, but I have a feeling the ones in Japan are way better. Just a feeling.
:)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
there are so many kinds of shaved ice in Japan. :)

Itaku mo Kayuku mo Nai (痛くも痒くもない - Not Caring at All)

Apr 5, 2019 16:56
Itaku mo Kayuku mo Nai

When you do not feel a thing about someone's action against you, you can express it as 'itaku mo kayuku mo nai' (痛くも痒くもない).

'Itai' (痛い) means "painful," 'kayui' (痒い) means "itchy," and 'nai' (ない) is a negative term, so the literal meaning of 'itaku mo kayuku mo nai' is "it is neither painful nor itchy."

Of course, this phrase can be used for physical pain/itching, but it is often used when there is no mental influence.

[Example] Kare ni waruguchi wo iwareta ga, itaku mo kayuku mo nai (彼に悪口を言われたが、痛くも痒くもない - "He said nasty things about me, but I do not care at all").
痛くも痒くもない

相手が何かをしてきても、少しも苦痛を感じなかったり、まったく影響がないとき、「痛くも痒くもない」と言うことがあります。

「痛い」は "to pain"、「痒い」は "to itch"、「ない」は否定語であるため、「痛くも痒くもない」の文字どおりの意味は "" となります。

もちろん肉体的な「痛み」「痒み」に対しても使える表現ですが、精神的な影響がないときに使われることが多いです。

【例文】彼に悪口を言われたが、痛くも痒くもない。
No. 1 Shakearita 's correction
Everything seems correct. No errors
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)
No. 2 Amop567's correction
  • When you do not feel a thing about someone's action against you, you can express it as 'itaku mo kayuku mo nai' (痛くも痒くもない).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Itai' (痛い) means "painful," 'kayui' (痒い) means "itchy," and 'nai' (ない) is a negative term, so the literal meaning of 'itaku mo kayuku mo nai' is "it is neither painful nor itchy."
  • 'Itai' (痛い) means "painful," 'kayui' (痒い) means "itchy," and adding 'nai' (ない) makes the adjective negative (OR: "nai" means "not〜"), so the literal meaning of 'itaku mo kayuku mo nai' is "it is neither painful nor itchy."
     "a negative term" doesn't work as a grammatical explanation (ie negative vs affirmative). It sounds as if you're saying it's not a positive thing to say.
  • Of course, this phrase can be used for physical pain/itching, but it is often used when there is no mental influence.
  • Of course, this phrase can be used for physical pain/itching, but it is (more) often used in a mental sense.
     This is clearer to me
  • [Example] Kare ni waruguchi wo iwareta ga, itaku mo kayuku mo nai (彼に悪口を言われたが、痛くも痒くもない - "He said nasty things about me, but I do not care at all").
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!

Kan Kinou Shougai (肝機能障害 - Hepatic Dysfunction)

Apr 4, 2019 10:15
Kan Kinou Shougai

Yesterday, I received the result of my medical checkup.

Sadly, I was diagnosed with 'kan kinou shougai' (肝機能障害).

Since 'kan' (肝) means "liver," 'kinou' (機能) means "function," and 'shougai' (障害) means "disorder" or "impairment," 'kan kinou shougai' means "liver function impairment" or "hepatic dysfunction."

I need to take an additional examination of the liver to know the details, but I could be a disease of "fatty liver" or "chronic hepatitis."

Today a welcome party will be held, but I have to refrain from drinking alcohol.
肝機能障害

昨日、健康診断の結果が届きました。

悲しいことに、「肝機能障害」と診断されてしまいました。

「肝」は "liver"、「機能」は "function"、「障害」は "disorder/impairment" を意味するので、「肝機能障害」は "liver function impairment" や "hepatic dysfunction" を意味します。

詳しくは追加の検査をしなければわかりませんが、「脂肪肝」もしくは「慢性肝炎」である可能性があります。

今日は歓迎会でしたが、私はお酒を飲むのを控えようと思います。
No. 1 Shakearita 's correction
Awe. I’m Sorry. Hopefully you will get better .
Toru
Thank you for the kind comment!
I will go to the hospital next week. :)

Tachi Ōjō (立ち往生 - Gridlock)

Apr 3, 2019 11:10
Tachi Ōjō

A traffic accident causing injury or death happened yesterday near the center of Tokyo, and many trains stopped, so many people did 'tachi ōjō' (立ち往生) at platforms.

The original meaning of 'tachi ōjō' is "to die while standing," but now it usually means a state in which someone is incapable of moving.

'Tachi' (立ち) means "to stand," and 'ōjō' (往生) is a Buddhist term that means "to die" or "to die and born in the legitimate land of Buddha."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'tachi ōjō' is equivalent to its original meaning.
立ち往生

昨日は都心で人身事故があり、電車が止まり、多くの人が駅で「立ち往生」していました。

「立ち往生」の本来の意味は「立ったまま死ぬこと」ですが、それが転じて「身動きがとれなくなること」を表すようになりました。

「立ち」は "to stand"、「往生」は仏教用語で「死んで仏の国に生まれること」や「死ぬこと」を意味します。

すなわち「立ち往生」の本来の意味は、文字どおりの意味ということです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
  • A traffic accident causing injury or death happened yesterday near the center of Tokyo, and many trains stopped, so many people did 'tachi ōjō' (立ち往生) at platforms.
  • A major traffic accident causing injury or death happened yesterday in downtown Tokyo, and many trains were stopped, so many people were doing 'tachi ōjō' (立ち往生) at the stations.
  • The original meaning of 'tachi ōjō' is "to die while standing," but now it usually means a state in which someone is incapable of moving.
  • "Tachi ōjō" originally meant "to die while standing," but now it usually means a state in which someone is incapable of moving forward.
  • 'Tachi' (立ち) means "to stand," and 'ōjō' (往生) is a Buddhist term that means "to die" or "to die and born in the legitimate land of Buddha."
  • 'Tachi' (立ち) means "to stand," and 'ōjō' (往生) is a Buddhist term that means "to die" or "to die and be reborn in the legitimate land of Buddha."
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Ne ni Motsu (根に持つ - Holding a Grudge)

Apr 2, 2019 21:50
Ne ni Motsu

To hold a grudge for a long time is referred to as 'ne ni motsu' (根に持つ) in Japanese.

Since 'ne' (根) means "root" and 'motsu' (持つ) means "to have" or "to hold," the literal meaning of 'ne ni motsu' is "to have/hold something with a root."

Here, "root" implies a bottom of one's heart.

In addition, the object that 'motsu' points to is what you were suffered in the past.

That is to say, 'ne ni motsu' implies that you remember what you were suffered in the past with the bottom of your heart.
根に持つ

いつまでも恨みに思って忘れないことを、日本語で「根に持つ」と言います。

「根」は "root"、「持つ」は "to have" や "to hold" を意味するので、「根に持つ」の文字どおりの意味は "to have/hold something with a root" となります。

ここで「根」は「心の底」を表します。

また、「持つ」が指しているものは、過去に受けた行いなどとなります。

すなわち「根に持つ」とは、「過去に受けた行いを心の底でずっと覚えている」というようなことを表しているわけです。
No. 1 AylesC's correction
  • Ne ni Motsu (根に持つ - Holding a Grudge)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Ne ni Motsu
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • To hold a grudge for a long time is referred to as 'ne ni motsu' (根に持つ) in Japanese.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since 'ne' (根) means "root" and 'motsu' (持つ) means "to have" or "to hold," the literal meaning of 'ne ni motsu' is "to have/hold something with a root."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Here, "root" implies a bottom of one's heart.
  • Here, "root" implies the bottom of one's heart.
  • In addition, the object that 'motsu' points to is what you were suffered in the past.
  • In addition, the object that 'motsu' points to is what you were suffered in the past.
  • That is to say, 'ne ni motsu' implies that you remember what you were suffered in the past with the bottom of your heart.
  • That is to say, 'ne ni motsu' implies that you remember what you were suffered in the past from the bottom of your heart.
Would it be grammatically accurate to say '根に持つの人'? (A person who holds a grudge.)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
> Would it be grammatically accurate to say '根に持つの人'?
根に持つの人 is a little grammatically wrong. 根に持つ人 is fine. :)
No. 2 Kento's correction
  • Since 'ne' (根) means "root" and 'motsu' (持つ) means "to have" or "to hold," the literal meaning of 'ne ni motsu' is "to have/hold something with a root."
  • Since 'ne' (根) means "root" and 'motsu' (持つ) means "to have" or "to hold," the literal meaning of 'ne ni motsu' is "to have/hold something with by the root."
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

The Kanji Character with the Largest Number of Strokes

Apr 1, 2019 20:06
The Kanji Character with the Largest Number of Strokes

Today I introduced you to the kanji character which has the largest number of strokes among daily-use kanji characters.

It is 鬱 (read as 'utsu'), which needs 29 brushstrokes.

鬱 can mean that plants grow thickly or things are active, but if you use it alone, it will mean "gloomy feeling" or "(clinical) depression."

I think that the action of writing this kanji will make you feel depressed.

Incidentally, the kanji with the second-largest number of strokes is 鑑 (read as 'kan/kagami'), which needs 23 brushstrokes.

鑑 means "example," "model," or "norm."
最も画数の多い漢字

今日は、常用漢字の中で最も画数の多い漢字を紹介します。

それは「鬱」で、29画となります。

「鬱」は、草木が茂っている様子や物事が盛んな様子も表しますが、単体で使った場合は「心が晴れ晴れしないこと」や「うつ病」の意味を表すことが多いです。

「鬱」という字を書くこと自体が、鬱な気分になります。

ちなみに、二番目に画数の多い漢字は「鑑」で、23画となります。

「鑑」は「手本」や「規範」という意味を持ちます。
No. 1 ユリヤ's correction
  • The Kanji Character with the Largest Number of Strokes
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The Kanji Character with the Largest Number of Strokes
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Today I introduced you to the kanji character which has the largest number of strokes among daily-use kanji characters.
  • Today I introduced to you to the kanji character which has the largest number of strokes among daily-use kanji characters.
  • It is 鬱 (read as 'utsu'), which needs 29 brushstrokes.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 鬱 can mean that plants grow thickly or things are active, but if you use it alone, it will mean "gloomy feeling" or "(clinical) depression."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I think that the action of writing this kanji will make you feel depressed.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Incidentally, the kanji with the second-largest number of strokes is 鑑 (read as 'kan/kagami'), which needs 23 brushstrokes.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 鑑 means "example," "model," or "norm."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 dec's correction
  • The Kanji Character with the Largest Number of Strokes
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The Kanji Character with the Largest Number of Strokes
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Today I introduced you to the kanji character which has the largest number of strokes among daily-use kanji characters.
  • Today I [will/would like to] introduced you to the kanji character which has the largest number of strokes among daily-use kanji characters.
  • It is 鬱 (read as 'utsu'), which needs 29 brushstrokes.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 鬱 can mean that plants grow thickly or things are active, but if you use it alone, it will mean "gloomy feeling" or "(clinical) depression."
  • 鬱 can mean that plants grow thickly or things are active, but if you use it alone, it will mean "gloomy feeling" or "(clinical) depression."
     "grow thickly or things are active"

    鬱然 ... 欝蒼
    It seems that there are very few words where this is used with the first sense.

    I'm not sure about the "things are active" meaning. I can't find any words matching that description, unless you are referring to 鬱勃?

    "if you use it alone"

    Most of the compounds also have a meaning of gloomy/depression.
  • I think that the action of writing this kanji will make you feel depressed.
  • I think that the action of writing this kanji will make you feel depressed.
     There must be something wrong with me. I like writing this character :)

    I find it interesting that the stroke order is 缶、林、冠、凶作…

    Normally if something is enclosed by some component, we draw the first part of the enclosing component first, eg: 徼 (彳、白、方、攵)or 門・闇

    I suppose that drawing 缶 first makes it easier to get the balance right so that all the parts can fit in the space properly.
  • Incidentally, the kanji with the second-largest number of strokes is 鑑 (read as 'kan/kagami'), which needs 23 brushstrokes.
  • Incidentally, the kanji with the second-largest number of strokes is 鑑 (read as 'kan/kagami'), which needs 23 brushstrokes.
     I never saw the かがみ reading before. That's interesting.
  • 鑑 means "example," "model," or "norm."
  • 鑑 means "example," "model," or "norm."
     My dictionary gives different meanings. For example:

    図鑑
    n, Illustrated reference book, illustrated encyclopedia (esp. for children), picture book.

    Kanji
    図: map, drawing, plan, extraordinary, audacious (JLPT N4) 
    鑑: specimen, take warning from, learn from (JLPT N1) 
ピポ
“鬱” does mean all of the things listed above. Both of the words listed for the first sense also can be used for the meaning in the second sense. “鬱乎 (ukko)” would be a word which takes the first sense, but I presume it could probably take the second, but it’s not explicitly listed in the copy of the Sanseido Daijirin that I’m using. “鬱勃” does refer to things that are active, but more so in the sense that it is popular. There is another sense that “鬱” can refer to that Toru didn’t mention and that would be to stagnate as in “鬱血 (ukketu)” which refers to vascular congestion (i.e. when a blood vessel becomes congested). I feel this is intrinsically related to the first sence, but it is nice to see it stated somewhere.
Whether or not “鬱” is mostly used in compounds nowadays to refer to being depressed doesn’t change the fact that if it used by itself than it’ll “mean ‘gloomy feeling’ or ‘(clinical) depression.’”

“鑑” can be read as “kagami.” It’s just not in the list of characters for regular use. It is from the same root as “鏡.” It’s just a different glyph for a different sense. The main sense in this case matches what Toru says, but it can also means (badly translated into English) written material that collects materials/data/documents. This describes 図鑑 which is a written material that systematically collects stuff centered around images and diagrams/chart (図). Thus 図鑑 (illustrated reference book) is an illustration-model.

I didn’t mean to ramble that much, but don’t worry because I also enjoy writing the character “鬱,” but a lot of people don’t and prefer to just write “うつ.”
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments!
And thank you for the explanations, ピポ-san! :)

> I'm not sure about the "things are active" meaning. I can't find any words matching that description, unless you are referring to 鬱勃?

As you said, there are few words containing 鬱 that mean "things are active."
鬱勃 might be the only word which matches the above description. As related words, there are 鬱憤 and 鬱血 (mentioned by ピポ-san).

Shisshō (失笑 - Bursting into Laughter)

Mar 31, 2019 22:19
Shisshō

Have you ever burst into laughter because something was so funny?

Such a laugh is referred to as 'shisshō' (失笑) in Japanese.

'Shi/shitsu' (失) usually means "lose," but here it means "mistake" or "wrong."

In addition, 'shō' (笑) means "laugh," so the literal meaning of 'shisshō' means "a wrong laugh."

However, since 'shitsu' (失) is familiar in the meaning of "lose," many Japanese people believe that 'shisshō' means "a bitter laugh."

According to a survey by the Agency for Cultural Affairs, more than 60% of Japanese people use this word incorrectly.
失笑

何かがおかしくて、こらえきれず笑ってしまったことはありますか?

そのような笑いを、日本語で「失笑」と言います。

「失」は通常 "lose" を意味しますが、ここでは "mistake/wrong" を意味します。

また、「笑」は "laugh" を意味するので、「失笑」での文字どおりの意味は "a wrong laugh" となります。

「失」の意味が "lose" である認識が強いためか、「失笑」の意味を「呆れて笑えない」と勘違いしている日本人がとても多いです。

文化庁のアンケート調査によると、60%以上の日本人がこの言葉を間違えて使っているそうです。
No. 1 Nofoofro's correction
  • Shisshō
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Have you ever burst into laughter because something was so funny?
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Such a laugh is referred to as 'shisshō' (失笑) in Japanese.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Shi/shitsu' (失) usually means "lose," but here it means "mistake" or "wrong."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In addition, 'shō' (笑) means "laugh," so the literal meaning of 'shisshō' means "a wrong laugh."
  • In addition, 'shō' (笑) means "laugh," so the literal meaning of 'shisshō' means is "a wrong laugh."
  • However, since 'shitsu' (失) is familiar in the meaning of "lose," many Japanese people believe that 'shisshō' means "a bitter laugh."
  • However, since 'shitsu' (失) is familiar in the meaning of often means "lose," many Japanese people believe that 'shisshō' means "a bitter laugh."
     I wasn't sure what you meant by "...is familiar in the meaning of..." The way I corrected it above means that when 失 appears in words, it usually means "lose," so people tend to read it as "lose" even when it means something else.
  • According to a survey by the Agency for Cultural Affairs, more than 60% of Japanese people use this word incorrectly.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Thank you for teaching us about 失笑 :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Yes, what I wanted to say is "失 usually means 'lose'."

Misoji (三十路 - Thirty Years Old)

Mar 30, 2019 21:59
Misoji

I was 'misoji' (三十路) last year.

'Misoji' means "thirty years old."

When describing one's age in Japanese, we usually add the word 'sai' (歳 - literally means "age") to the word meaning a number, but there are special expressions for some ages, such as twenty years old and thirty years old.

Twenty years old is called 'hatachi' (二十歳), thirty years old is called 'misoji' (三十路), forty years old called 'yosoji' (四十路), and fifty years old is called 'gosoji' (五十路).

Some people say 'misoji' to mean "thirties," but this usage is wrong.
三十路

私は去年、「三十路」でした。

「三十路」とは、30歳のことです。

日本語で年齢を言う場合、通常は数字に年を表す「歳」をつけますが、20歳や30歳には特別な読み方があります。

20歳は「二十歳(はたち)」、30歳は「三十路(みそじ)」、40歳は「四十路(よそじ)」、50歳は「五十路(ごそじ)」と言います。

「三十路」を「30代」という意味で使う人もいますが、これは間違いです。
No. 1 Ckasper's correction
  • Misoji (三十路 - Thirty Years Old)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Misoji
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I was 'misoji' (三十路) last year.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Misoji' means "thirty years old."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • When describing one's age in Japanese, we usually add the word 'sai' (歳 - literally means "age") to the word meaning a number, but there are special expressions for some ages, such as twenty years old and thirty years old.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Twenty years old is called 'hatachi' (二十歳), thirty years old is called 'misoji' (三十路), forty years old called 'yosoji' (四十路), and fifty years old is called 'gosoji' (五十路).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Some people say 'misoji' to mean "thirties," but this usage is wrong.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Very good writing, and informative! I knew about 二十歳, but not the others
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 ピポ's correction
This is one of those things where writing じ as ぢ would make more sense because it shows ち becoming voiced (i.e. ち→ぢ). Also, I’ve only ever heard up to 四十路, so I was suprised to hear that someone would pronounce 五十路 as ごそじ with an On reading of ご instead of something similar to いつ. Indeed, I’ve looked up and found: 五十路(いそ じ), 六十路(むそ じ), 七十路(なな そじ), 八十路(やそ じ), and 九十路(ここのそ じ). Japanese sure is interesting.

この場合には、「じ」の代わりに「ぢ」を書く方がいいと思います。何故なら、「ち→ぢ」という連濁化は明らかになるでしょう。私は四十路まで聞いたことだけがあるから、「五十路」の読み方は、「いつ」の近くの代わりに「ご」という音読みの「ごそじ」だと聞いたとき、びっくりしました。如何にも、「五十路(いそ じ)」「六十路(むそ じ)」「七十路(なな そじ)」「八十路(やそ じ)」「九十路(ここのそ じ)」を調べました。日本語は真面目に面白いですね。

Nagori (なごり - Remnant)

Mar 29, 2019 06:55
Nagori

Today is the last working day at my university.

Now I am feeling 'nagori' (なごり) to this university where I have been working for three years.

'Nagori' means feelings, odors or atomosphere that is left/remains after things pass by.

It is thought that this term was made by shortening 'naminokori' (波残り). (Note that this word is no longer used.)

Since 'nami' (波) means "(sea) wave" and 'nokori' (残り) means "remnant," "leftover" or "residual."

That is to say, 'naminokori' means various things that remain after waves break on a shore.
なごり

今日は、現在の大学の最終勤務日です。

私は3年間働いてきたこの大学に、「名残」を感じています。

「なごり」とは、物事が過ぎ去ったあとに残る、気配や余韻・余情のことです。

この言葉は、「波残り」が省略されてできたものと考えられています。

「波」は "(sea) wave"、「残り」は "leftover" や "residual" を意味します。

すなわち「波残り」は、浜辺に波が打ち寄せた後そこに残る、さまざまなものを意味します。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
  • Today is the last working day at my university.
  • Today is the last working day at my university.
     Your last day working there?
  • Now I am feeling 'nagori' (なごり) to this university where I have been working for three years.
  • Now I am feeling 'nagori' (なごり) about this university where I have been working for three years.
  • 'Nagori' means feelings, odors or atomosphere that is left/remains after things pass by.
  • 'Nagori' means feelings, scents or atmosphere that is left/remains after things pass by.
     odors can mean (not always) a bad smell, so I replaced it.
  • It is thought that this term was made by shortening 'naminokori' (波残り).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • (Note that this word is no longer used.)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since 'nami' (波) means "(sea) wave" and 'nokori' (残り) means "remnant," "leftover" or "residual."
  • 'Nami' (波) means "(sea) wave" and 'nokori' (残り) means "remnant," "leftover" or "residual."
  • That is to say, 'naminokori' means various things that remain after waves break on a shore.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Dowasure (ど忘れ - Lapse of Memory)

Mar 28, 2019 17:11
Dowasure

I often do 'dowasure' (ど忘れ).

'Dowasure' means that you suddenly forget something you know well and simply can't come up with it.

'Wasure' (忘れ) means "to forget," but I think that most Japanese people do not know where 'do' (ど) comes from.

'Do' is written in kanji as 度, and it means "degree" or "dimension."

This term was borne from the Chinese story 韓非子 -- in this story, a man measured his foot dimensions to buy shoes, but he went to a store without the dimension notes.
ど忘れ

私はしばしば「ど忘れ」をします。

「ど忘れ」とは、よく知っているはずの物事を忘れてしまい、思い出せないことを意味します。

「忘れ」は "to forgot" を意味しますが、「ど」の由来を知っている日本人は多くないと思います。

ど忘れの「ど」は漢字で「度」と書き、"degree" や "dimension" を意味します。

この言葉は、中国の故事「韓非子」において、靴を買うため足の寸法(度)を測ったが、その書付けを忘れてお店に行ったという話から生まれました。
No. 1 dec's correction
  • Dowasure (ど忘れ - Lapse of Memory)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Dowasure
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I often do 'dowasure' (ど忘れ).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Dowasure' means that you suddenly forget something you know well and simply can't come up with it.
  • 'Dowasure' means that you [temporarily/momentarily/suddenly] forget something you know well and simply can't come up with it.
  • 'Wasure' (忘れ) means "to forget," but I think that most Japanese people do not know where 'do' (ど) comes from.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Do' is written in kanji as 度, and it means "degree" or "dimension."
  • 'Do' is written in kanji as 度, and it means "degree" or "dimension."
     or "time"/"times"
  • This term was borne from the Chinese story 韓非子 -- in this story, a man measured his foot dimensions to buy shoes, but he went to a store without the dimension notes.
  • This term seems to derive from the Chinese story 韓非子. In this story, a man measured the size of his feet in order to buy shoes, but he went to the store without the dimension notes.
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post! :)

Suima ni Osowareru (睡魔に襲われる - Getting Sleepy)

Mar 27, 2019 22:23
Suima ni Osowareru

I am very sleepy now.

When you become very drowsy or sleepy, it can be described as 'suima ni osowareru' (睡魔に襲われる) in Japanese.

'Sui' (睡) means "sleep," 'ma' (魔) means "devil," 'osou' (襲う) means "to attak," and 'wareru' (われる) is a passive expression, so the literal meaning of this phrase is "to be attacked by a devil of sleep."

As you can guess, this phrase compares strong sleepiness that is hard to resist to a devil of sleep.
睡魔に襲われる

私は今、とても眠たいです。

激しい眠気を感じることを、「睡魔に襲われる」と表現することがあります。

「睡」は "sleep"、「魔」は "devil"、「襲う」は "to attak"、そして「われる」は受け身表現であるため、「睡魔に襲われる」の文字どおりの意味は "to be attacked by a devil of sleep" となります。

抵抗し難い強い眠気を、魔物にたとえているというわけです。
No. 1 dec's correction
  • Suima ni Osowareru (睡魔に襲われる - Getting Sleepy)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Suima ni Osowareru
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I am very sleepy now.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • When you become very drowsy or sleepy, it can be described as 'suima ni osowareru' (睡魔に襲われる) in Japanese.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Sui' (睡) means "sleep," 'ma' (魔) means "devil," 'osou' (襲う) means "to attak," and 'wareru' (われる) is a passive expression, so the literal meaning of this phrase is "to be attacked by a devil of sleep."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • As you can guess, this phrase compares strong sleepiness that is hard to resist to a devil of sleep.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Perfect.

You might like to know that 睡魔 can also be translated as "The Sandman", otherwise known as Morpheus.

There's a very famous comic series called "The Sandman":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sandman_(Vertigo)
https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%82%B5%E3%83%B3%E3%83%89%E3%83%9E%E3%83%B3_(%E3%83%B4%E3%82%A1%E3%83%BC%E3%83%86%E3%82%A3%E3%82%B4)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the new term!
It's really interesting! :)

Saiketsu (採血 - Blood Sampling)

Mar 26, 2019 23:05
Saiketsu

Today I went to a hospital for a health check.

Among the health check, there was 'saiketsu' (採血) that I do not like.

Since 'sai' (採) means "to collect" and 'ketsu' (血) means "blood," the combination 'saiketsu' literally means "to collect blood."

When collecting my blood, the nurse said, "it is very easy to collect blood from your blood vessels."

The reason was that seven vessels for blood collection could be observed clearly.

The nurse also said, "your arm is best for injection practice for novice nurses," but I thought that it was really disgusting.
採血

今日は入社前の健康診断に行きました。

その中で、私の嫌いな「採血」もありました。

「採」は "to collect"、「血」は "blood" を意味するので、「採血」は文字どおり "to collect blood" を意味します。

採血をするとき、看護師さんは私に「とても採血をしやすい血管でありがたいです」と言いました。

採血するための血管が、はっきりと7本浮かび上がっているからだそうです。

「新人の注射練習に最適」とも言われましたが、絶対に嫌だと思いました。
No. 1 Viji's correction
  • Saiketsu
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Today I went to a hospital for a health check.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Among the health check, there was 'saiketsu' (採血) that I do not like.
  • Among the various tests, there was 'saiketsu' (採血) that I do not like.
  • Since 'sai' (採) means "to collect" and 'ketsu' (血) means "blood," the combination 'saiketsu' literally means "to collect blood."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • When collecting my blood, the nurse said, "it is very easy to collect blood from your blood vessels."
  • When collecting my blood, the nurse said, "it is very easy to collect blood from you as your blood vessels clearly visible."
  • The reason was that seven vessels for blood collection could be observed clearly.
  • The reason was that seven vessels for blood collection could be observed clearly.
     Included with the previous sentence
  • The nurse also said, "your arm is best for injection practice for novice nurses," but I thought that it was really disgusting.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Good luck ! Hope you got the job :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Bon to Shōgatsu ga Issho ni Kita-yō (盆と正月が一緒に来たよう - Very Busy)

Mar 25, 2019 16:48
Bon to Shōgatsu ga Issho ni Kita-yō

I am very busy now because of retirement, entering a new job, and moving.

Such a busyness can be described as 'bon to shōgatsu ga issho ni kita-yō' (盆と正月が一緒に来たよう) in Japanese.

'Bon' (盆) is the Buddhist Festival of ancestral spirits, 'shōgatsu' (正月) means "New Year's holidays," 'issho' (一緒) means "together," and 'kita-yō' (来たよう) means "as if something came," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "as if both Bon and new year came together."

If there were an American version of this, it could be "as if Thanksgiving and Christmas came at the same time."
盆と正月が一緒に来たよう

私は現在、退職、入職、転居などで非常に忙しいです。

このように非常に忙しいことを、「盆と正月が一緒に来たよう」と表現することがあります。

「盆」は "Buddhist Festival of ancestral spirits"、「正月」は "New Year's holidays"、「一緒に」は "together"、「来たよう」は "as if something came" を意味するので、この表現の文字どおりの意味は "as if both Bon and new year came together" となります。

アメリカ版にするなら、「感謝祭とクリスマスが同時に来たよう」となるかもしれません。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
  • Bon to Shōgatsu ga Issho ni Kita-yō (盆と正月が一緒に来たよう - Very Busy)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I am very busy now because of retirement, entering a new job, and moving.
  • I am very busy now because of lreavting my foremer positiont, entering a new job, and moving.
     "retirement" (引退)usually means "when you stop working altogether"
  • Such a busyness can be described as 'bon to shōgatsu ga issho ni kita-yō' (盆と正月が一緒に来たよう) in Japanese.
  • FrantiSuch ally busy timnes like these can be described as 'bon to shōgatsu ga issho ni kita-yō' (盆と正月が一緒に来たよう) in Japanese.
     Just another way to phrase it!
  • 'Bon' (盆) is the Buddhist Festival of ancestral spirits, 'shōgatsu' (正月) means "New Year's holidays," 'issho' (一緒) means "together," and 'kita-yō' (来たよう) means "as if something came," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "as if both Bon and new year came together."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • If there were an American version of this, it could be "as if Thanksgiving and Christmas came at the same time."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
忙しすぎそうですよね!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Nizukuri (荷造り - Packing)

Mar 25, 2019 00:55
Nizukuri

Now I am doing 'nizukuri' (荷造り) for moving out of my apartment.

Since 'ni' (荷) means "package" and 'zukuri/tsukuri' (造り) means "to make," the literal meaning of 'nizukuri' is "to make a package."

Actually, this term means to put various things together in a box/bag or tie them together with a string.

In English, it can be translated as "packing."

It is said that packing should be started two weeks before moving, but I started packing a week before moving.

The move will take place after three days, but packing has not finished at all.
荷造り

私は今、「荷造り」をしています。

「荷」は "package"、「造り」は "make" を意味するので、「荷造り」の文字どおりの意味は "to make a package" となります。

実際には、さまざまなものをまとめて箱や袋につめたり、ひもで結んだりすることを意味します。

英語では "packing" と表現されます。

荷造りは引っ越しの2週間前が目安と言われていますが、私は引っ越しの1週間前から始めました。

引っ越しは3日後ですが、まだ全く終わっていません。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
  • Now I am doing 'nizukuri' (荷造り) for moving out of my apartment.
  • Now I am doing 'nizukuri' (荷造り) to move out of my apartment.
  • Since 'ni' (荷) means "package" and 'zukuri/tsukuri' (造り) means "to make," the literal meaning of 'nizukuri' is "to make a package."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Actually, this term means to put various things together in a box/bag or tie them together with a string.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In English, it can be translated as "packing."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • It is said that packing should be started two weeks before moving, but I started packing a week before moving.
  • It is said that packing should be started two weeks before moving out, but I started packing a week before moving.
  • The move will take place after three days, but packing has not finished at all.
  • I will move out in three days or so, but I have not finished packing at all.
Good, and best wishes! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Sudatsu (巣立つ - Leaving a Nest)

Mar 23, 2019 23:56
Sudatsu

In my yesterday's post, I used the Japanese word 'sudatsu' (巣立つ).

Since 'su' (巣) menas "nest" and 'datsu/tatsu' (立つ) means "to stand" or "to fly," the literal meaning of 'sudatsu' is "to fly a nest."

Of course, this word literally can mean that birds' children grow and leave their nests.

However, when using it to people, it means that children leave their parents or graduate from school/university then go into the world.

By using this word, you can emphasize feelings of pathos compare to just saying 'shakaijin ni naru' (社会人になる - literally means "to become a member of society") or 'dokuritsu suru' (独立する - literally means "to become independent").
巣立つ

昨日の投稿の中で、私は「巣立つ」という言葉を使いました。

「巣」は "nest"、「立つ」は "to stand" や "to fly" を意味するので、「巣立つ」の文字どおりの意味は "to fly the nest" となります。

もちろん、「巣立つ」は文字どおり、鳥の子などが成長して巣を去るという意味を持ちます。

しかし、人に対して使った場合は、子どもが親元を離れることや、学校を卒業して社会に出ることを意味する言葉になります。

単に「社会人になる」や「独立する」と言うよりも、哀愁を帯びた感じを出すことができます。
No. 1 dec's correction
  • Sudatsu (巣立つ - Leaving a Nest)
  • Sudatsu (巣立つ - To Leave a Nest)
     "leaving" a nest would be 巣立ち, a noun
  • Sudatsu
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In my yesterday's post, I used the Japanese word 'sudatsu' (巣立つ).
  • In my yesterday's post yesterday, I used the Japanese word 'sudatsu' (巣立つ).
     It's not "your" yesterday. It belongs to everyone!
  • Since 'su' (巣) menas "nest" and 'datsu/tatsu' (立つ) means "to stand" or "to fly," the literal meaning of 'sudatsu' is "to fly a nest."
  • Since 'su' (巣) menas "nest" and 'datsu/tatsu' (立つ) means "to stand" or "to fly," the literal meaning of 'sudatsu' is "to fly [from] a nest."
     Usually when we use "to fly" as a transitive verb, the object is something like "an airplane", so if you want to explain the general meaning of 巣立つ, it's better to say "to fly from a nest."

    There is an exception for "to fly the nest", but that only has a metaphorical meaning.
  • Of course, this word literally can mean that birds' children grow and leave their nests.
  • Of course, this word can literally can mean that young birds grow and leave their nests.
  • However, when using it to people, it means that children leave their parents or graduate from school/university then go into the world.
  • However, when using it in the context of people, it means that children leave their parents' home or that they graduate from school/university and go out into the world.
  • By using this word, you can emphasize feelings of pathos compare to just saying 'shakaijin ni naru' (社会人になる - literally means "to become a member of society") or 'dokuritsu suru' (独立する - literally means "to become independent").
  • By using this word, you can emphasize feelings of pathos or sympathy compared to just saying 'shakaijin ni naru' (社会人になる - literally meaning "to become a member of society") or 'dokuritsu suru' (独立する - literally meaning "to become independent").
     I'm not sure if "pathos" is the right word here.
    Ah, OK. 哀愁 ・哀れ
    Maybe "sorrow" is better, though.
There is also an expression in English called "empty nest syndrome." It's not a real (medical) syndrome, though. It describes life for parents whose children have all "flown the nest."
Toru
Thank you so much for the helpful correction again!
And thank you for letting me know that phrase! :)

Megashira ga Atsuku Naru (目頭が熱くなる - One's Eyes Fill with Tears)

Mar 22, 2019 23:49
Megashira ga Atsuku Naru

The day before yesterday, a graduation ceremony took place at my university.

When I saw students who would spread their wings, my eyes filled with tears.

When one's eyes fill with tears like my case, it can be expressed as the Japanese phrase 'megashira ga atsuku naru' (目頭が熱くなる).

'Me' (目) means "eye," 'gashira/kashira' (頭) means "head," and the combination means "inner corner of one's eye."

In addition, 'atsuku naru' (熱くなる) means "to get hot," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "inner corners of one's eyes get hot."

It is thought that it comes from the fact that tears accumulated in your eyes would make you feel warm.
目頭が熱くなる

一昨日は、私の大学の卒業式が行われました。

巣立っていく学生の姿を見ると、私は感動で思わず涙が出そうになりました。

このように、感動で涙が出そうになることを、日本語で「目頭が熱くなる」と言います。

「目」は "eye"、「頭」は "head" を意味し、「目頭」で "inner corner of one's eye" を意味します。

また、「熱くなる」は "to get hot" を意味するので、この慣用句の文字どおりの意味は "inner corners of one's eyes get hot" となります。

涙が目頭に溜まると暖かく感じることに由来すると考えられます。
No. 1 Haritosh's correction
  • Megashira ga Atsuku Naru
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The day before yesterday, a graduation ceremony took place at my university.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • When I saw students who would spread their wings, my eyes filled with tears.
  • When I saw students who would spread out their wings and fly high, my eyes filled with tears.
  • When one's eyes fill with tears like my case, it can be expressed as the Japanese phrase 'megashira ga atsuku naru' (目頭が熱くなる).
  • When one's eyes fill with tears like in my case, it can be expressed as using the Japanese phrase 'megashira ga atsuku naru' (目頭が熱くなる).
  • 'Me' (目) means "eye," 'gashira/kashira' (頭) means "head," and the combination means "inner corner of one's eye."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In addition, 'atsuku naru' (熱くなる) means "to get hot," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "inner corners of one's eyes get hot."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • It is thought that it comes from the fact that tears accumulated in your eyes would make you feel warm.
  • It is the thought that it comes from the fact that tears accumulated in your eyes would make you feel warm.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Sihou Happou (四方八方 - Every Direction)

Mar 21, 2019 20:58
Sihou Happou

In my previous post, I introduced the word 'happou' (八方), which means every direction in the surroundings.

Of course, 'happou' itself makes sense, but if you want to emphasize that directions are diverse, you can use the four-character idiom 'sihou happou' (四方八方).

'Shi' (四) means "four," 'ha/hachi' (八) means "eight," 'hou/pou' (方) means "direction," so the literal meaning of this idioms is "four directions and eight directions."

Both 'sihou' (四方) and 'happou' (八方) mean every direction, but in the narrow sense, the former means north, south, east and west, and the latter means northeast, northwest, southeast and northeast in addition to 'sihou'.
四方八方

以前の投稿の中で、周囲のさまざまな方向を表す「八方」という言葉を紹介しました。

もちろん「八方」だけでも意味をなしますが、より周囲のさまざまな方向であることを強調したい場合、「四方八方」と言うこともできます。

「四」は "four"、「八」は "eight"、「方」は "direction" を意味するので、「四方八方」の文字どおりの意味は "four directions and eight directions" となります。

「四方」も「八方」もさまざまな方向を表す言葉ですが、狭義において「四方」は「北」「南」「東」「西」、八方はそこに「北東」「北西」「南東」「南西」を加えた方向のことです。
No. 1 dec's correction
  • Sihou Happou (四方八方 - Every Direction)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Sihou Happou
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In my previous post, I introduced the word 'happou' (八方), which means every direction in the surroundings.
  • In my previous post, I introduced the word 'happou' (八方), which means every direction in the surroundings.
  • Of course, 'happou' itself makes sense, but if you want to emphasize that directions are diverse, you can use the four-character idiom 'sihou happou' (四方八方).
  • Of course, 'happou' itself makes sense by itself, but if you want to emphasize that directions are diverse, you can use the four-character idiom 'sihou happou' (四方八方).
     two different senses of "itself" (where you placed it, it sounds like それ自体)

    In English, we say "every which way" if we want to emphasise "in all (various) directions". This "way" can mean either "direction" or "method." It's probably more commonly used for "method", but you could say:

    "Every which way he looked, there was nothing but trees and rocks. There was no sign of the path anywhere"
  • 'Shi' (四) means "four," 'ha/hachi' (八) means "eight," 'hou/pou' (方) means "direction," so the literal meaning of this idioms is "four directions and eight directions."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Both 'sihou' (四方) and 'happou' (八方) mean every direction, but in the narrow sense, the former means north, south, east and west, and the latter means northeast, northwest, southeast and northeast in addition to 'sihou'.
  • Both 'sihou' (四方) and 'happou' (八方) mean every direction, but in the narrow sense, the former means north, south, east and west, and the latter means northeast, northwest, southeast and northeast in addition to the four cardinal directions.
     We call NSEW the "cardinal" directions.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and the helpful comment!

'Yōshi Tanrei' and 'Bimoku Shūrei' (「容姿端麗」と「眉目秀麗」 - "Beautiful Features")

Mar 21, 2019 01:03
'Yōshi Tanrei' and 'Bimoku Shūrei'

Yesterday, I introduced you to the four-character idom 'saishoku kenbi' (才色兼備), which means to be both beautiful and talented.

If you want to talk about only someone's beautiful features, you can use other idioms, 'yōshi tanrei' (容姿端麗) or 'bimoku shūrei' (眉目秀麗).

Since 'yōshi' (容姿) means "features" and 'tanrei' (端麗) means "beauty/beautiful," the literal meaning of 'yōshi tanrei' is "beautiful features."

Since 'bi' (眉) means "eyebrow," 'moku' (目) means "eye," and 'shūrei' means "beauty/beautiful," the literal meaning of 'bimoku shūrei' is "beautiful eyebrows and eyes."

The former can be used to both men and women, whereas the latter is usually used to men.
「容姿端麗」と「眉目秀麗」

昨日は、才能と美しい容姿の両方を持つことを意味する「才色兼備」という四字熟語を紹介しました。

もし美しい容姿についてだけ言いたい場合は、「容姿端麗」か「眉目秀麗」を使うことができます。

「容姿」は "features"、「端麗」は "beauty/beautiful" を意味するので、「容姿端麗」の文字どおりの意味は "beautiful features" となります。

「眉」は "eyebrow"、「目」は "eye"、「秀麗」は "beauty/beautiful" を意味するので、「眉目秀麗」の文字どおりの意味は "beautiful eyebrows and eyes" となります。

前者は男女どちらにも、後者は主に男性に対して使われます。
No. 1 アニャ's correction
  • Yesterday, I introduced you to the four-character idom 'saishoku kenbi' (才色兼備), which means to be both beautiful and talented.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • If you want to talk about only someone's beautiful features, you can use other idioms, 'yōshi tanrei' (容姿端麗) or 'bimoku shūrei' (眉目秀麗).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since 'yōshi' (容姿) means "features" and 'tanrei' (端麗) means "beauty/beautiful," the literal meaning of 'yōshi tanrei' is "beautiful features."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since 'bi' (眉) means "eyebrow," 'moku' (目) means "eye," and 'shūrei' means "beauty/beautiful," the literal meaning of 'bimoku shūrei' is "beautiful eyebrows and eyes."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The former can be used to both men and women, whereas the latter is usually used to men.
  • The former can be used for both men and women, whereas the latter is usually used for men.
How interesting! Thank you for teaching me these new words. I hope you don't mind if I send you a friend request, I would like to learn more idioms!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to be friends with you. :)
No. 2 jeemeegee's correction
  • If you want to talk about only someone's beautiful features, you can use other idioms, 'yōshi tanrei' (容姿端麗) or 'bimoku shūrei' (眉目秀麗).
  • If you want to talk about someone's beautiful features exclusively, you can use other idioms such as 'yōshi tanrei' (容姿端麗) or 'bimoku shūrei' (眉目秀麗).
     "exclusively" = option.
    "only" is totally okay. :)
Good :)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
jeemeegee
Any time!

Saishoku Kenbi (才色兼備 - Being both Talented and Beautiful)

Mar 20, 2019 21:43
Saishoku Kenbi

Have you ever seen a person with both talent and beautiful features?

Such a person is described as the four-character idiom 'saishoku kenbi' (才色兼備).

'Sai' (才) means "talent/gift" and 'shoku' (色) means "features," so the combination 'saishoku' (才色) means "talent and beautiful features."

In addition, 'ken' (兼) means "both" and 'bi' (備) means "to have," so the literal meaning of 'saishoku kenbi' is "to have both talent and beautiful features."

It can also mean a person having both brains and beauty.

Note that this idiom is usually used to women.
才色兼備

あなたの身の回りには、才能と美しい容姿の両方を持つ人はいますか?

そのような人は「才色兼備」と呼ばれます。

「才」は "talent/gift"、「色」は "features" を意味するので、「才色」は "talent and beautiful features" を意味します。

また、「兼」は "both"、「備」は "to have" を意味するので、「才色兼備」の文字どおりの意味は "to have talent and beautiful features" となります。

この熟語は、機知に富んでいてかつ美しいという意味でもよく使われます。

通常、女性に対して使われるということに注意してください。
No. 1 BOK's correction
  • Saishoku Kenbi (才色兼備 - Being both Talented and Beautiful)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Saishoku Kenbi
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Have you ever seen a person with both talent and beautiful features?
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Such a person is described as the four-character idiom 'saishoku kenbi' (才色兼備).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Sai' (才) means "talent/gift" and 'shoku' (色) means "features," so the combination 'saishoku' (才色) means "talent and beautiful features."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In addition, 'ken' (兼) means "both" and 'bi' (備) means "to have," so the literal meaning of 'saishoku kenbi' is "to have both talent and beautiful features."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • It can also mean a person having both brains and beauty.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Note that this idiom is usually used to women.
  • Note that this idiom is usually used to women.
     Note that this idiom is usually used for women.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 中村ジェイ's correction
It is a really good lesson! I'll make a note of what to say to compliment someone I'm interested in! Hahaha
Toru
Thank you for the comment!
I think that this idiom is one of the best compliments to please people. :)
No. 3 sjstrauss's correction
  • Saishoku Kenbi
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Have you ever seen a person with both talent and beautiful features?
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Such a person is described as the four-character idiom 'saishoku kenbi' (才色兼備).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Sai' (才) means "talent/gift" and 'shoku' (色) means "features," so the combination 'saishoku' (才色) means "talent and beautiful features."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In addition, 'ken' (兼) means "both" and 'bi' (備) means "to have," so the literal meaning of 'saishoku kenbi' is "to have both talent and beautiful features."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • It can also mean a person having both brains and beauty.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Note that this idiom is usually used to women.
  • Note that this idiom is usually used on/for/to refer to women.
Only a small correction :)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
sjstrauss
No problem ^^
No. 4 Fifi's correction
  • Have you ever seen a person with both talent and beautiful features?
  • Have you ever met a person with both talent and beauty?
  • Such a person is described as the four-character idiom 'saishoku kenbi' (才色兼備).
  • Such a person can be described with the four-character idiom 'saishoku kenbi' (才色兼備).
  • Note that this idiom is usually used to women.
  • Note that this idiom is usually used for women.
Oh, that is a good word. I will use it in my 自己紹介.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Sounds nice! :)
No. 5 dec's correction
  • Saishoku Kenbi (才色兼備 - Being both Talented and Beautiful)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Saishoku Kenbi
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Have you ever seen a person with both talent and beautiful features?
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Such a person is described as the four-character idiom 'saishoku kenbi' (才色兼備).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Sai' (才) means "talent/gift" and 'shoku' (色) means "features," so the combination 'saishoku' (才色) means "talent and beautiful features."
  • 'Sai' (才) means "talent/gift" and 'shoku' (色) means "appearance," so the combination 'saishoku' (才色) means "talent and appearance."
     "features" isn't wrong, but it could mean a lot of things, like 機能 or 特色
  • In addition, 'ken' (兼) means "both" and 'bi' (備) means "to have," so the literal meaning of 'saishoku kenbi' is "to have both talent and beautiful features."
  • In addition, 'ken' (兼) means "both" and 'bi' (備) means "to have," so the literal meaning of 'saishoku kenbi' is "to be endowed with both talent and beautiful features."
     I think that 有する is better than "have", so I changed it to "be endowed with"
  • It can also mean a person having both brains and beauty.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Note that this idiom is usually used to women.
  • Note that this idiom is usually used to describe women.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Atama ga Panku (頭がパンク - One's Head is Explode)

Mar 19, 2019 00:20
Atama ga Panku

I am about to 'atama ga panku' (頭がパンク).

'Atama' (頭) means "head" and 'panku' (パンク) comes from the English "punctured," so the literal meaning of 'atama ga panku (suru)' (頭がパンクする) is "one's head is punctured (flattened)."

I think that it is not difficult to imagine situations where this phrase is used.

You can use this when you have too many jobs or tasks to do and your brain is about to literally be punctured.

In English, it can be translated as "one's head/mind is going to explode" or "to be about to panic."
頭がパンク

私は今、「頭がパンク」しそうです。

「頭」は "head"、「パンク」は英語の "punctured" から来ており、「頭がパンクする」の文字どおりの意味は "one's head is punctured (flattened)" となります。

この表現がどのようなシチュエーションで使われるか、想像するのは難しくないと思います。

するべき仕事や課題が多すぎて、文字どおり頭が破裂しそうなときです。

英語では "one's head/mind is going to explode" や "to be about to panic" のように訳されます。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
  • Atama ga Panku (頭がパンク - One's Head is Explode)
  • Atama ga Panku (頭がパンク - One's Head is Explode)
     Be careful here. "Explode" is a verb.
  • I am about to 'atama ga panku' (頭がパンク).
  • I am about to 'atama ga panku' (頭がパンク).
     lol
  • 'Atama' (頭) means "head" and 'panku' (パンク) comes from the English "punctured," so the literal meaning of 'atama ga panku (suru)' (頭がパンクする) is "one's head is punctured (flattened)."
  • 'Atama' (頭) means "head" and 'panku' (パンク) comes from the English (word) "punctured," so the literal meaning of 'atama ga panku (suru)' (頭がパンクする) is "one's head is punctured (flattened)."
  • I think that it is not difficult to imagine situations where this phrase is used.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • You can use this when you have too many jobs or tasks to do and your brain is about to literally be punctured.
  • You can use this when you have too many jobs or tasks to do and your brain is about to literally be punctured (OR: go flat).
     Not wrong but this is more idiomatic. It's supposed to be like a tire going flat right?
  • In English, it can be translated as "one's head/mind is going to explode" or "to be about to panic."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Very useful
Amop567
  • Atama ga Panku (頭がパンク - One's Head is Explode)

    Be careful here. "Explode" is a verb.

sorry should be "Explodes" not "Explode"
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Shucchō (出張 - Business Trip)

Mar 18, 2019 12:54
Shucchō

I am now visiting the US on a business trip.

To visit a different area from one's usual place of work is referred to as 'shucchō' (出張) in Japanese.

'Shucchō' (出張) comes from the verb 'debaru' (出張る) -- the former is Chinese reading, whereas the latter is Japanese reading.

Since 'de' (出) means "to go out" and 'baru/haru' (張る) means "to set up," the literal meaning of 'debaru' is "to go out and set up something."

Originally, this term was used to mean to go to another area for war.

The two kanji character 出 and 張 imply that you go to the battlefield and set up the camp.
出張

私は今、出張 (business trip)でアメリカに来ています。

仕事などのために普段の勤務地とは別の場所に行くことを、日本語で「出張」と言います。

「出張」は、動詞「出張る」の漢字を音読みにしたものです。

「出」は ""、「張る」は "" を意味するので、「出張る」の文字どおりの意味は "" になります。

もともとこの言葉は、戦のために他の地域に出向くことを表していました。

戦場に出向き、陣を張ることから、「出」と「張」という時が使われているというわけです。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
  • I am now visiting the US on a business trip.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • To visit a different area from one's usual place of work is referred to as 'shucchō' (出張) in Japanese.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Shucchō' (出張) comes from the verb 'debaru' (出張る) -- the former is Chinese reading, whereas the latter is Japanese reading.
  • 'Shucchō' (出張) comes from the verb 'debaru' (出張る) -- the former is the Chinese reading, whereas the latter is Japanese reading.
     No need to mention reading twice. Also, there is no need to put "the" in front of "Japanese", but you do need "the" in front of the Chinese (definite article).

    That's what I think, but I could be wrong :)
  • Since 'de' (出) means "to go out" and 'baru/haru' (張る) means "to set up," the literal meaning of 'debaru' is "to go out and set up something."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Originally, this term was used to mean to go to another area for war.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The two kanji character 出 and 張 imply that you go to the battlefield and set up the camp.
  • The two kanji characters 出 and 張 imply that you go to the battlefield and set up the camp.
Good :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Monku (文句 - Complaint/Criticism)

Mar 17, 2019 12:26
Monku

I do not like people who often say 'monku' (文句).

Since 'mon' (文) means "sentence" and 'ku' (句) means "phrase," the literal meaning of 'monku' is "sentences and phrases."

Of course, this term can mean its literal meaning.

However, if you use just 'monku' without adjectives, it will mean "complaint" or "criticism."

[Example 1] Kare wa itsumo monku wo itte iru (彼はいつも文句を言っている - "He always make complains").

[Example 2] Kanojo wa monku nashi no tensai da (彼女は文句なしの天才だ - "She is an undisputed genius").
文句

私は「文句」ばかり言う人が好きではありません。

「文」は "sentence"、「句」は "phrase" を意味するので、「文句」の文字どおりの意味は "sentences and phrases" となります。

もちろん、「文句」は文字どおりの意味を表すこともあります。

しかし、形容詞を何もつけずに単に「文句」と言った場合、"complaint/criticism" を意味します。

【例文1】彼はいつも文句を言っている。

【例文2】彼女は文句なしの天才だ。
No. 1 dec's correction
愚痴愚痴もまく。
Toru
「ぐちぐち言う」 or 「愚痴を言う」 or 「管を巻く」が自然な言い方です。 :)
No. 2 dec's correction
  • I do not like people who often say 'monku' (文句).
  • I do not like people who often engage in 'monku' (文句).
     It's hard to mix English and Japanese here.

    文句を言う is "to complain" or "to grumble"

    When you use "say" with something in quotation marks, it's very literal: "I don't like people who say X."

    However, you're not talking about people who say "monku". You are talking about people who grumble/complain.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 3 friendfromfaraway's correction
  • Monku (文句 - Complaint/Criticism)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I do not like people who often say 'monku' (文句).
  • I do not like people who often say 'monku' (文句).
  • Since 'mon' (文) means "sentence" and 'ku' (句) means "phrase," the literal meaning of 'monku' is "sentences and phrases."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Of course, this term can mean its literal meaning.
  • Of course, this term can also mean its literal meaning.
  • However, if you use just 'monku' without adjectives, it will mean "complaint" or "criticism."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • [Example 1] Kare wa itsumo monku wo itte iru (彼はいつも文句を言っている - "He always make complains").
  • [Example 1] Kare wa itsumo monku wo itte iru (彼はいつも文句を言っている - "He always make complaints").
  • [Example 2] Kanojo wa monku nashi no tensai da (彼女は文句なしの天才だ - "She is an undisputed genius").
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting me! :)
No. 4 Fifi's correction
  • [Example 1] Kare wa itsumo monku wo itte iru (彼はいつも文句を言っている - "He always make complains").
  • [Example 1] Kare wa itsumo monku wo itte iru (彼はいつも文句を言っている - "He always makes complaints").
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Yō wo Tasu (用を足す - Go to the Bathroom)

Mar 15, 2019 23:56
Yō wo Tasu

I used the expression 'yō wo tasu' (用を足す) in my yesterday's post.

'Yō' (用) means "errand" and 'tasu' (足す) means "to add" or "to do what is necessary."

Of course, this expression can literally mean "to do a necessary errand," but if you say just 'yō wo tasu' (用を足す), it will mean to go to the bathroom in most cases.

It implies that you do what is necessary as a human in the bathroom.

As other indirect expressions, there are 'ohana tsumi ni iki' (お花摘みに行く - "I will go picking flowers") and 'kiji uchi ni iki' (雉撃ちに行く - "I will go pheasant hunting"), though they are now rarely used.
用を足す

私は昨日の投稿の中で、「用を足す」という表現を使いました。

「用」は "errand"、「足す」は "to add/do what is necessary" を意味します。

この表現はもちろん、文字どおり "to do a necessary errand" を意味することもありますが、単に「用を足す」とだけ言った場合は「トイレに行く」ことを意味する場合が多いです。

「トイレでしなければいけない用事を済ませる」ということを暗に意味しているわけです。

他の間接的な表現としては、あまり使われませんが「お花摘みに行く」や「雉撃ちに行く」などがあります。
No. 1 dec's correction
  • Yō wo Tasu (用を足す - Go to the Bathroom)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Yō wo Tasu
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I used the expression 'yō wo tasu' (用を足す) in my yesterday's post.
  • I used the expression 'yō wo tasu' (用を足す) in my post yesterday.
  • 'Yō' (用) means "errand" and 'tasu' (足す) means "to add" or "to do what is necessary."
  • 'Yō' (用) means "errand" and 'tasu' (足す) means "to add" or "to do what is necessary."
     Elvis had a phrase "I'm just taking care of business." If he spoke Japanese, he would probably used exactly the same expression. (ただ、用を足している)
  • Of course, this expression can literally mean "to do a necessary errand," but if you say just 'yō wo tasu' (用を足す), it will mean to go to the bathroom in most cases.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • It implies that you do what is necessary as a human in the bathroom.
  • It implies that you do what is necessary as a human in the bathroom.
     or taking care of "a certain thing/business/task" (用) that we all know about, but don't talk about directly.
  • As other indirect expressions, there are 'ohana tsumi ni iki' (お花摘みに行く - "I will go picking flowers") and 'kiji uchi ni iki' (雉撃ちに行く - "I will go pheasant hunting"), though they are now rarely used.
  • As other indirect expressions, there are 'ohana tsumi ni iku' (お花摘みに行く - "I will go picking flowers") and 'kiji uchi ni iku' (雉撃ちに行く - "I will go pheasant hunting"), though they are now rarely used.
     まあ、ね。高い草の用・様ですね。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
> まあ、ね。高い草の用・様ですね。
Originally, it seems that these expressions were used to imply urinating/defecating while hiking.

The Toilet was Clogged

Mar 15, 2019 05:47
The Toilet was Clogged

I have visited Washington D.C. to attend an academic conference.

And I have stayed at a hotel near the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, but I had big trouble this morning.

The toilet in my room was clogged.

I might have used too much toilet paper.

As a last resort, I called the front desk and said "Excuse me. The toilet in my room is blocked. Can someone come and fix it?"

The front desk clerk said "Okay," but no one came to my room for a while, so I left five dollars as a chip and headed to the conference venue.

I would like to be more careful in the future.
トイレが詰まった

私は今、学会参加のためワシントンD.C.に来ています。

そしてコンベンションセンター近くのホテルに泊まっているのですが、今朝大きなトラブルがありました。

トイレが詰まったのです。

トイレットペーパーを多く使いすぎたのかもしれません。

仕方がないのでフロントに電話して "Excuse me, the toilet is clogged. Can someone come and fix it?" と修理をお願しました。

フロントの従業員は "Okay" と言いましたが、しばらく待っても人が来なかったので、5ドルのチップを置いて学会会場に向かいました。

次からは気をつけたいです。
No. 1 xMichaelx's correction
  • I have visited Washington D.
  • I am visiting Washington D.
  • C.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • to attend an academic conference.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • And I have stayed at a hotel near the Walter E.
  • And I am staying at a hotel near the Walter E.
     Or "I have been staying at..."
  • Washington Convention Center, but I had big trouble this morning.
  • Washington Convention Center, but I had a lot of trouble this morning.
     or "I have a big problem"
  • The toilet in my room was clogged.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I might have used too much toilet paper.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • As a last resort, I called the front desk and said "Excuse me.
  • As a last resort, I called the front desk and said, "Excuse me.
  • The toilet in my room is blocked.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Can someone come and fix it?"
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The front desk clerk said "Okay," but no one came to my room for a while, so I left five dollars as a chip and headed to the conference venue.
  • The front desk clerk said, "Okay." However no one came to my room for a while, so I left five dollars as a tip and headed to the conference venue.
     It's better to only connect two sentences at a time when writing.
  • I would like to be more careful in the future.
  • I need to be more careful in the future.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 jeemeegee's correction
  • I have visited Washington D.
  • I have visited Washington D.
  • to attend an academic conference.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • And I have stayed at a hotel near the Walter E.
  • And I have stayed at a hotel near the Walter E.
  • Washington Convention Center, but I had big trouble this morning.
  • Washington Convention Center, but I had big problem this morning.
  • The toilet in my room was clogged.
  • The toilet in my room was clogged up.
  • I might have used too much toilet paper.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • As a last resort, I called the front desk and said "Excuse me.
  • As a last resort, I called the front desk and said "Excuse me.
     "As a last resort" means that you have tried other ways to fix the problem but was unsuccessful. So, it makes sense to write something about what you did to solve the problem before this sentence. :)
  • The toilet in my room is blocked.
  • The toilet in my room is clogged up.
  • Can someone come and fix it?"
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The front desk clerk said "Okay," but no one came to my room for a while, so I left five dollars as a chip and headed to the conference venue.
  • The front desk clerk said "Okay," but no one came to my room for quite a while. So I left five dollars as a tip and headed to the conference venue.
  • I would like to be more careful in the future.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Here's one way of rewriting this:

I am currently in Washington D.C. for an academic conference and staying at a hotel near the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. This morning, I ran into a big problem: the toilet in my room got clogged up. I might have used too much toilet paper. I tried to fix the problem a few times but failed, and so I called the front desk and said, "Excuse me. My toilet is clogged up. Can someone come and fix it?". The clerk replied, "Okay." After waiting for quite some time, nobody came to fix the toilet. So I left $5 as a tip and headed to the conference venue. I should be more careful next time.

Good job! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and rewriting!
That's very helpful! :)
jeemeegee
You're welcome!

Shichiten Hakki (七転八起 - Never Giving Up)

Mar 13, 2019 04:11
Shichiten Hakki

If there is a person who tries many times despite repeated failures, his/her behavior can be described as the four-character idiom 'shichiten hakki' (七転八起).

'Shichi' (七) means "seven," 'ten' (転) means "to fall down," 'ha/hachi' (八) means "eight," and 'ki' (起) means "to get up," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "fall down seven times, get up eight times."

You might think that the number of getting up must be seven when the number of falling down is seven, but "seven" and "eight" here just imply that the number is large.

Incidentally, you can say it as 'nanakorobi yaoki' (七転び八起き) by using Japanese readings.
七転八起

何度失敗してもめげずに起き上がることを、「七転八起」と言います。

「七」は "seven"、「転」は ""、「八」は "eight"、「起」は "" を意味するので、「七転八起」の文字どおりの意味は "" となります。

七回転んだら起き上がるのも七回だろうと思うかもしれませんが、ここでの「七」や「八」は単に数が多いことを表しているようです。

ちなみに、訓読みで「七転び八起き」と言うこともあります。
No. 1 Eric's correction
  • If there is a person who tries many times despite repeated failures, his/her behavior can be described as the four-character idiom 'shichiten hakki' (七転八起).
  • If there is a person who tries many times despite repeated failures, his/her behavior can be described by the four-character idiom 'shichiten hakki' (七転八起).
  • 'Shichi' (七) means "seven," 'ten' (転) means "to fall down," 'ha/hachi' (八) means "eight," and 'ki' (起) means "to get up," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "fall down seven times, get up eight times."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • You might think that the number of getting up must be seven when the number of falling down is seven, but "seven" and "eight" here just imply that the number is large.
  • You might think that the amount of times that one gets up must be seven when the amount of times they fall down is also seven, but "seven" and "eight" here just imply that the number is large.
  • Incidentally, you can say it as 'nanakorobi yaoki' (七転び八起き) by using Japanese readings.
  • Incidentally, you can also say it as 'nanakorobi yaoki' (七転び八起き) by using native Japanese readings.
Let me know if you have any questions!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
  • If there is a person who tries many times despite repeated failures, his/her behavior can be described as the four-character idiom 'shichiten hakki' (七転八起).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Shichi' (七) means "seven," 'ten' (転) means "to fall down," 'ha/hachi' (八) means "eight," and 'ki' (起) means "to get up," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "fall down seven times, get up eight times."
  • 'Shichi' (七) means "seven," 'ten' (転) means "to fall down," 'ha/hachi' (八) means "eight," and 'ki' (起) means "to get up," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "fall down seven times, get up eight times."
  • You might think that the number of getting up must be seven when the number of falling down is seven, but "seven" and "eight" here just imply that the number is large.
  • You might think that the number of times getting up must be "seven" when the number of times falling down is seven, but "seven" and "eight" here just imply that the number is are large.
     確かに。
  • Incidentally, you can say it as 'nanakorobi yaoki' (七転び八起き) by using Japanese readings.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Bravo!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Gobu Gobu (五分五分 - Half and Half)

Mar 12, 2019 18:20
Gobu Gobu

Yesterday, I introduced you to the four-character idiom 'kubu kurin' (九分九厘), which means that a probability or achievement is almost 100% (literally means 99%).

If you want to express that the probability is about 50%, you can use the four-character idiom 'gobu gobu' (五分五分).

'Go' (五) means "five," 'bu' (分) is a unit representing ratios, and 'ichibu' (一分 - "one bu") is 10%, so the literal meaning of this idiom is "50% and 50%."

'Gobu gobu' can mean not only probability but also that there is no priority between two persons (or two things).
五分五分

昨日は、可能性や達成度合いがほぼ100%(99%)であることを表す「九分九厘」という四字熟語を紹介しました。

可能性が約50%程度であることを表したい場合には、「五分五分」という四字熟語を使うことができます。

「五」は "five"、「分」は割合を表す単位を意味し、「一分」は「10%」であるので、「五分五分」の文字どおりの意味は "50% and 50%" となります。

「五分五分」は可能性だけでなく、二者間(もしくは二つの物事間)において優劣がないことを表す際にも用いられます。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
  • Gobu Gobu (五分五分 - Half and Half)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Yesterday, I introduced you to the four-character idiom 'kubu kurin' (九分九厘), which means that a probability or achievement is almost 100% (literally means 99%).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • If you want to express that the probability is about 50%, you can use the four-character idiom 'gobu gobu' (五分五分).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Go' (五) means "five," 'bu' (分) is a unit representing ratios, and 'ichibu' (一分 - "one bu") is 10%, so the literal meaning of this idiom is "50% and 50%."
  • 'Go' (五) means "five," 'bu' (分) is a unit representing ratios, and 'ichibu' (一分 - "one bu") is 10%, so the literal meaning of this idiom is "50% and 50%."
  • 'Gobu gobu' can mean not only probability but also that there is no priority between two persons (or two things).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Kubu Kurin (九分九厘 - A Hundred to One)

Mar 11, 2019 15:14
Kubu Kurin

Yesterday, I introduced you to the four-character idiom 'jucchū hakku' (十中八九), which means that the probability is high.

When interpreting this idiom literally, the probability is 80% to 90%.

If you want to express a higher probability, such as 99%, you can use the four-character idiom 'kubu kurin' (九分九厘).

'Ku' (九) means "nine," and 'bu' (分) and 'rin' (里) are units representing ratios or probabilities -- they mean "10%" and "1%," respectively.

That is to say, 'kubu kurin' literally means 99%.

This idiom can be used not only for probability but also for progress or completeness of things.
九分九厘

昨日は、可能性が高いことを表す四字熟語「十中八九」を紹介しました。

この四字熟語を文字どおり解釈すると、その確率は80%~90%ということになります。

もしもっと高い可能性、例えば99%の確率などを表したい場合は、「九分九厘」を使うことができます。

「九」は "nine"、「分」と「厘」は割合を表す単位であり、それぞれ「10%」と「1%」を意味します。

すなわち「九分九厘」の文字どおりの意味は、「99%」というわけです。

この言葉は可能性や確率だけでなく、物事の進捗や完成度合いなどに対しても使うことができます。

Jucchū Hakku (十中八九 - Ten to One)

Mar 10, 2019 22:07
Jucchū Hakku

To express that possibility is high or something is most likely to happen, you can use the four-character idiom 'jucchū hakku' (十中八九)

'Ju/jū' (十) means "ten," 'chū' (中) means "in" or "inside," 'ha/hachi' (八) means "eight," and 'ku/kyū' (九) means "nine."

That is to say, 'jucchū hakku' means that the possibility is eight or nine when the total of the possibility is ten.

In other words, it means that the possibility is 80% to 90%.

[Example] 'Ashita wa jucchū hakku hareru' (明日は十中八九晴れる - "Ten to one it will be fine tomorrow.")
十中八九

可能性の高やほとんど確実であることを表す四字熟語に「十中八九」があります。

「十」は "ten"、「中」は "in/inside"、「八」は "eight"、「九」は "nine" を意味します。

すなわち「十中八九」とは、可能性の全体を10としたとき、8か9でそれが起こるということを表します。

言い換えると、可能性が「80%~90%」というわけです。

【例文】明日は十中八九晴れる。
No. 1 dec's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and kind explanations again! :)
No. 2 sjstrauss's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for checking my post! :)
sjstrauss
No problem :)

Kan-muryō (感無量 - Deep Emotion)

Mar 9, 2019 15:43
Kan-muryō

Yesterday, I introduced you to the phrase 'mune ga ippai ni naru' (胸が一杯になる), which means that one's heart is filled.

The word 'kan-muryō' (感無量) has a similar meaning to this phrase.

'Kan-muryō' is short for 'kangai muryō' (感慨無量), and it can be divided into two parts: 'kangai' (感慨) and 'muryō' (無量).

'Kan' (感) means "feeling," 'gai' (慨) means "emotion" and 'kangai' means "deep emotion."

In addition, 'mu' (無) means "nothing," 'ryō' (量) means "quantity," and 'muryō' means "innumerable."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'kan-muryō' and 'kangai muryō' is one's innumerable deep emotion.
感無量

昨日は、感情で心が満たされることを意味する「胸がいっぱいになる」という表現を紹介しました。

これと同様の意味を持つ言葉に、「感無量」があります。

「感無量」は「感慨無量」を省略した言葉であり、「感慨」と「無量」に分けることができます。

「感」は "feeling"、「慨」は "emotion" を意味し、「感慨」で "deep emotion" という意味になります。

また、「無」は "nothing"、「量」は "quantity" を意味し、「無量」で "innumerable" という意味になります。

すなわち「感慨無量」および「感無量」は、"one's innumerable deep emotion" を意味するというわけです。
No. 1 dec's correction
dec
  • That is to say, the literal meaning of 'kan-muryō' and 'kangai muryō' is one's innumerable deep emotions.

    or "unfathomably deep" because 量 can also mean "measure", as in 測量。
    "fathom" can be a measure of depth, but it can also be a verb meaning "to measure the depth". It's often used metaphorically (similar to how "deep" is used in Japanese, like 欲深い、興味深い)

Also "immeasurably deep emotion", which is probably better than "unfathomably" because that has an extra sense of mystery:

"immeasurably superior" (so superior that we almost can't measure the difference)
"unfathomably superior" (so superior that we can't even begin to understand the difference)
Toru
Thank you so much for the helpful correction again!
And thank you for letting me know the various expressions. :)

> Can you say ~ without saying what emotion is filling the heart?
As you mentioned, 胸が一杯になる is usually used with a certain emotion, but it can also be used without saying it. In that case, the emotion is probably a positive one.

Mune ga Ippai ni Naru (胸がいっぱいになる - Overflowing)

Mar 8, 2019 15:44
Mune ga Ippai ni Naru

Yesterday, a farewell party for teachers who would retire or change their jobs at my university was held.

Since I was also one of the teachers who leave the university, my boss paid me a heartfelt compliment, then I was filled with joy.

When you are filled with emotions such as joy or grief, you can describe it as 'mune ga ippai ni naru' (胸がいっぱいになる).

'Mune' (胸) means "heart," 'ippai' (いっぱい) means "full" or "many," and 'naru' (なる) means "to be," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "one's heart is filled."

[Example] Kanasimi de mune ga ippai ni natta (悲しみで胸がいっぱいになった - "I overflowed with grief").
胸がいっぱいになる

昨日、私の大学で退職・転職する教員の送別会が行われました。

私も転職する教員の一人で、上司からとても嬉しいお言葉を頂き、喜びで心が満たされました。

このように、喜びや悲しみなどの感情で心が満たされることを、「胸がいっぱいになる」と言います。

「胸」は "heart"、「いっぱい」は "full/many"、「になる」は "to be" を意味するので、この表現の文字どおりの意味は "one's heart is filled" となります。

【例文】悲しみで胸がいっぱいになった。
No. 1 jlynn85's correction
勉強になりました! 
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 dec's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and helpful comments! :)

> "overflowed" sounds weird in English in this case. Does 溢れる also sound strange in Japanese?
I think that using 溢れる to emotions does not sound strange in Japanese. For example, we say 悲しみが溢れる or 喜びで満ち溢れる.
dec
有難う、Toruさん。色々勉強になりました。
dec
Speaking of being "full" or "overflowing", you might also like another English expression... "brimming with", eg "brimming with excitement/enthusiasm/confidence/etc". You can also use it for physical things: "the basket was brimming with tasty treats", "his eyes were brimming with tears". The brim of a container is the top part, so if something is "brimming", it's on the boundary between full and overflowing. (also "full to the brim")

dec
Also, now that I come to think of it, "overjoyed" also has a sense of 溢れる…
Toru
Wow, thank you for the informative comments!
It's very helpful and interesting. :)

Ōme ni Miru (大目に見る - Overlooking)

Mar 7, 2019 16:57
Ōme ni Miru

Yesterday, I introduced you to the idiom 'ōmedama wo kuu' (大目玉を食う), which means to be scolded harshly.

There is another idiom having a common part with this, 'ōme ni miru' (大目に見る).

'Ō' (大) means "big," and 'me' (目) usually means "eye," but it can also mean gaps in an object, and especially here it means "gaps of a sieve."

In addition, 'miru' (見る) means "to look," so the literal meaning of 'ōme ni miru' is "to look at something using a big sieve."

Since such a sieve with big gaps passes through anything, 'ōme ni miru' means to overlook someone's failure or shortcomings.
大目に見る

昨日は、ひどく叱られることを意味する「大目玉を食う」という慣用句を紹介しました。

共通の部分を持つ別の慣用句に、「大目に見る」があります。

「大」は "big" を、「目」は通常 "eye" を意味しますが、物の隙間などを意味することもでき、ここでは特に「篩(ふるい)の目」を意味します。

また、「見る」は "to look" を意味するので、「大目に見る」も文字どおりの意味は "to look at something using a big sieve."

目の荒い篩はなんでも通してしまうことから、「大目に見る」は「誰かの過失や欠点をとがめずに寛大に扱うこと」を意味します。

Ōmedama wo Kuu (大目玉を食う - Getting a Rocket)

Mar 6, 2019 20:38
Ōmedama wo Kuu

To be scolded very harshly can be described as 'ōmedama wo kuu' (大目玉を食う) in Japanese.

'Ō' (大) means "big," 'me' (目) means "eye," and 'dama/tama' (玉) means "ball," so the combination 'ōmedama' means "big eyeballs."

In addition, 'kuu' (食う) usually means "to eat," but it can also mean "to receive an undesirable deed."

Therefore, the literal meaning of this idiom is "to receive big eyeballs."

Here, big eyeballs stand for the wide eyes of a person who scold someone very harshly.
大目玉を食う

目上の人からひどく叱られることを、「大目玉を食う」と言います。

「大」は "big"、「目」は "eye"、「玉」は "ball" を意味するので、「大目玉」は "big eyeballs" を意味します。

また、「食う」は通常 "to eat" を意味しますが、ここでは「望ましくない行為を受ける」ことを意味します。

したがって、「大目玉を食う」の文字通りの意味は "to receive big eyeballs" となります。

ここでの「大目玉」は、人が誰かを叱っているときの見開いた目を表しているというわけです。
No. 1 dec's correction
おもしろい表現ですね。でも、見る人の立場となったら、真逆の表現もあると思い出した。それは、「大目に見る」。「大目」の部分が共通なのに。
Toru
コメントありがとうございます!
確かに共通の部分があるのに意味は全く違いますね。

調べてみたら、「大目」の「目」は、「篩(ふるい)の隙間の粗さ」を表しているようです。早速、今日のトピックに使わせていただきました。
dec
「篩(ふるい)の隙間の粗さ」の意味について…
Is it something like "falling through the cracks" or "the exception proves the rule?"
Toru
Sorry for the late reply.

It's difficult for me to explain.
I wanted to say something like "a rough/big sieve (net) let everything pass through."

Temae Miso (手前味噌 - Self-Praise)

Mar 5, 2019 22:15
Temae Miso

I think that everyone sometimes wants to compliment oneself.

Such an action can be described as 'temae miso' (手前味噌) in Japanese.

'Te' (手) means "hand," 'mae' (前) means "front," and the combination 'temae' (手前) means "at hand" or "oneself."

In addition, 'miso' (味噌) means "fermented soybean paste," but it can also mean "an ingenuity point" or "a claim to fame" because miso was made by each house's unique formula.

Therefore, 'temae miso' came to have the meaning of "pride" or "self-praise."

[Example] 'Temae miso desuga, musuko wa kasikoi desu' (手前味噌ですが、息子は賢いです - "I don't mean to brag, but my son is clever").
手前味噌

誰でも、自分自身のことを褒めたくなることがあると思います。

そのような行為のことを、日本語で「手前味噌」と表現することがあります。

「手」は "hand"、「前」は "front" を意味し、「手前」で「自分の目の前」や「自分自身」を表します。

また、「味噌」は "fermented soybean paste" を意味する言葉ですが、味噌はかつて各家庭で工夫をこらして作られていたことから、「工夫点」や「自慢とする点」を意味することもあります。

このことから、「手前味噌」は「自慢」の意味を持つようになったというわけです。

【例文】手前味噌ですが、息子は賢いです。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
I heard someone use the phrase "toot my own horn" in English the other day and wondered what that would be in Japanese... I think this is kind of the same thing :) interesting post, as always.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the interesting idiom!
> I think this is kind of the same thing
It may be so, but 手前味噌 also contains the nuance of condescension.:)

Kubittake (首ったけ - Being Head-Over-Heels in Love)

Mar 4, 2019 16:50
Kubittake

Today, I found the term 'kubittake' (首ったけ) when I was listening to Japanese music.

'Kubittake' means that someone is hooked about something, especially someone is madly in love with another person.

This term comes from 'kubitake' (首丈) -- 'kubi' (首) means "neck" and 'take' (丈) means "length."

Originally, 'kubitake' literally meant the length from someone's foot to the neck.

Since we said that you plunged into something from your foot to neck for describing that you are hooked about it, 'kubittake' came to have its current meaning.
首ったけ

今日、邦楽を聴いていたら「首ったけ」という言葉が歌詞に出てきました。

「首ったけ」とは何かにに夢中になるさま、特に異性に惚れ込むさまを表す言葉です。

「首ったけ」は「首丈」から来ており、「首」は "neck"、「丈」は "length" を意味します。

もともとこの言葉は、文字どおり足先から首までの長さを意味していました。

人が何かに夢中になることを、「足から首までどっぷり浸かる・はまる」と言ったことから、「首ったけ」は現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 中村ジェイ's correction
I know the feeling of that Japanese word super well XD.
Toru
I think the feeling is part of being young. :)

Waki ga Amai (脇が甘い - Vulnerable)

Mar 3, 2019 14:06
Waki ga Amai

To describe that someone's defenses are weak or someone is vulnerable, you can say the Japanese idiom 'waki ga amai' (脇が甘い).

'Waki' (脇) means "armpit" and 'amai' (甘い) means "sweet" or "lax," so the literal meaning of 'waki ga amai' is "one's armpit is sweet" or "one's armpit is lax."

Of course, it does not literally mean that someone's armpit is sweet.

This idiom comes from a traditional Japanese sport, 'sumō' (相撲).

In sumō, if you do not close tightly your armpits, you will be thrown and defeated.

Because of this, 'waki ga amai' came to have its current meaning.
脇が甘い

守りが弱いことや、用心が足らず相手につけこまれやすいことを、「脇が甘い」と表現します。

「脇」は "armpit"、「甘い」は "sweet" や "lax" を意味するので、「脇が甘い」の文字通りの意味は "one's armpit is sweet" や "one's armpit is lax" となります。

しかし決して、"someone's armpit is sweet" という意味ではありません。

この慣用句は、日本の伝統的なスポーツである相撲に由来します。

相撲では、脇をしっかり締めていないとまわしを取られてすぐに負けてしまいます。

このことから、「脇が甘い」は現在の意味を持つようになりました。
No. 1 Dustin's correction
Great writing! Very interesting stuff :)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Yubi wo Kuwaeru (指をくわえる - Enviously)

Mar 2, 2019 23:53
Yubi wo Kuwaeru

When you can't do anything while feeling envious of something, it can be described as 'yubi wo kuwaeru' (指をくわえる) in Japanese.

'Yubi' (指) means "finger" and 'kuwaeru' (くわえる) means "to suck" or "to put in," the literal meaning of "yubi wo kuwaeru" is "to suck one's finger."

Here, in particular, the finger means "index finger."

This phrase comes from the fact that children suck their index finger when they can't get what they want.

[Example] Kare wa yubi wo kuwaete sono shouhin wo miteita (彼は指をくわえてその商品を見ていた - "He looked enviously at that product.")
指をくわえる

何かをうらやましく思いながらも何もできずにいることを、日本語で「指をくわえる」と言います。

「指」は "finger"、「くわえる」は "to suck/to put in" を意味するので、「指をくわえる」の文字通りの意味は "to suck one's finger" となります。

ここでの「指」は、特に「人差し指」を意味しています。

この表現は、子どもが何かを欲しくても手に入らないとき、指をくわえて我慢するようすから生まれました。

【例文】彼は指をくわえてその商品を見ていた。
No. 1 RainbowHeartUnicorn's correction
Everything was correct in this journal! I appreciate the Japanese lesson that came with it, haha
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Fude ga Tatsu (筆が立つ - Skillful Writer)

Mar 1, 2019 19:53
Fude ga Tatsu

The Japanese phrase 'fude ga tasu' (筆が立つ) can be used to people who have good writing skills.

'Fude' (筆) is a kind of writing instrument used from old times, and it can be translated as "ink brush" in English.

In addition, 'tatsu' (立つ) usually means "to stand," but it has also several meanings, and here it means "to have a good skill."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'fude ga tatsu' is that someone has a good skill about an ink brush.

However, note that it does not means that someone can write beautiful characters, but means that someone can write good sentences.
筆が立つ

文章を書くのがうまいことを、日本語で「筆が立つ」と言います。

「筆」は古くから使われている筆記具のことで、英語では "ink brush" と訳されます。

また、「立つ」は通常 "to stand" を意味しますが、複数の意味を有しており、ここでは「技能などがすぐれている」ことを意味します。

すなわち「筆が立つ」の文字どおりの意味は「筆の扱いに長けている」ということになります。

ただし、「字が上手であること」ではなく、「文章を書くのが上手であること」を意味するという点に注意して下さい。
No. 1 jaycee's correction
Interesting. Jaycee
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Kaze wo Kiru (風を切る - Feeling the Wind)

Feb 28, 2019 21:46
Kaze wo Kiru

To walk, run, or rotate swiftly can be described as 'kaze wo kiru' (風を切る) in Japanese.

'Kaze' (風) means "wind" and 'kiru' (切る) means "to cut," so the literal meaning of 'kaze wo kiru' is "to cut the wind."

Here the verb 'kiru' (cut) expresses that something moves swiftly against the wind.

In addition, to walk proudly or strut while rising and lowering the shoulders is referred to as 'kata de kaze wo kiru' (肩で風を切る - literally means "to cut the wind with one's shoulders."

[Example sentence] Kare wa kata de kaze wo kitte aruita (彼は肩で風を切って歩いた - "He strutted/swaggered.")
風を切る

勢いよく進むことや、勢いよく回転することを、「風を切る」と表現します。

「風」は "wind," 「切る」は "cut" を意味するので、「風を切る」の文字どおりの意味は "to cut the wind" となります。

勢いよく風に逆らって動くさまを、「切る」と表現しているというわけです。

また、肩をそびやかして得意そうに歩くことを、「肩で風を切る」と言います。

【例文】彼は肩で風を切って歩いた。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
:)
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)
jeemeegee
You're welcome!

Nami no Hana (波の花)

Feb 27, 2019 19:52
Nami no Hana

Today, I would like to introduce the term 'nami no hana' (波の花), which even Japanese people do not use frequently.

'Nami' (波) means "(sea) wave," and 'hana' (花) means "flower," but can you imagine what the combination 'nami no hana' (literally means "flowers of waves") means?

There are two answers.

One is simple -- it means sea waves with white foam.

The sea foam is regarded as flowers or ears of rice.

The other is "salt," which is made from seawater.

In the past, since the word 'shio' (塩 - "salt") could be misunderstood as 'shi wo' (死を - "death to you"), court ladies used 'nami no hana' instead of 'shio'.
波の花

今日は、日本人も普段あまり使わない「波の花」という言葉を紹介します。

「波」は "(sea) wave"、「花」は "flower" を意味しますが、これらを組み合わせた「波の花」が何を意味するか想像できるでしょうか?

正解は二つあります。

一つは単純で、白く泡立った海の波のことです。

白く泡立った波を、花(穂)に見立てているわけです。

もう一つは、海水から作られる「塩」です。

かつて、「塩」という文字は「死を」を連想させることから、これを忌み嫌い、「塩」の隠語として「波の花」が使われていたようです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
I see. Sounds like a very elegant phrase ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Yes, perhaps only elegant women use this term.

Kinu wo Saku youna Koe (絹を裂くような声 - A Piercing Scream)

Feb 26, 2019 19:35
Kinu wo Saku youna Koe

Have you ever heard of a woman's piercing or shrill scream?

Such a voice can be referred to as 'kinu wo saku youna koe' (絹を裂くような声) in Japanese.

'Kinu' (絹) means "silk," 'saku' (裂く) means "to split" or "to tear," 'youna' (ような) means "-like" or "as if," and 'koe' (声) means "voice," so the literal meaning of this expression is "a voice like a sound generated when splitting a silk."

This comes from the fact that a high-pitched and sharp sound is produced when splitting a silk cloth.
絹を裂くような声

女性の甲高い悲鳴を聞いたことはありますか?

そのような声のことを、日本語で「絹を裂くような声」と表現することがあります。

「絹」は "silk"、「裂く」は "to split/tear"、「ような」は "-like/as if"、「声」は "voice" を意味するので、この表現の文字通りの意味は "a voice like a sound generated when splitting a silk" となります。

これは、絹の布を裂くとき、高く鋭い音が出る事実に由来します。

Kirifuda (切り札 - Trump)

Feb 25, 2019 22:12
Kirifuda

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term 'denka no houtou' (伝家の宝刀), which means a measure of last resort that you use in an emergency.

There is another Japanese term that has a similar meaning, 'kirifuda' (切り札).

'Kiri' (切り) means "cut," 'fuda' (札) means "card," and 'kirifuda' was originally used to mean the strongest card in card games.

As you can guess, the strongest card is a measure/thing that you can use in an emergency.

There are several theories about its etymology, but one of them explains that it comes from the fact that the strongest card could cut other cards.
切り札

昨日は、「いざというときに出すとっておきの手段」を意味する「伝家の宝刀」という言葉を紹介しました。

「伝家の宝刀」と同様の意味を持つ言葉に、「切り札」があります。

「切り」は "cut"、「札」は "card" を意味し、「切り札」はもともと、カードゲームなどで最も強い力を持つカードのことを表していました。

最も強い力を持つカードは、いざというときに出すとっておきの物・手段というわけです。

「切り札」の語源は諸説ありますが、ある説では「最も強い札は他の札を切るから」と説明しています。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
I knew 切り札, but I didn’t know 伝家の宝刀. Thank you!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
You have a substantial vocabulary. :)
artboy598
Lol I learn these kinds of words from video games lol.
No. 2 ジャック's correction
「切り札」という言葉はアニメでよく聞いていますが、何かピンチの時に「〜まだ切り札がある」みたいなセリフから何とか意味がわかるような気がしました。由来はカードゲームだなんて面白いですね。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
そうですね、「切り札」や「伝家の宝刀」は、よくピンチに時に使います。
言葉の由来について調べると、面白い発見がたくさんあります。:)

Denka no Houtou (伝家の宝刀 - A Last Resort)

Feb 24, 2019 23:27
Denka no Houtou

A measure of last resort that you use in an emergency is referred to as 'denka no houtou' (伝家の宝刀) in Japanese.

'Den' (伝) means "tradition," 'ka' (家) means "family" or "house," and the combination 'denka' (伝家) means something that has been passed down in someone's family for generations.

In addition, 'hou' (宝) means "treasure" and 'tou' (刀) means "sword," so the literal meaning of 'denka no houtou' is "a treasured sword that has been passed down in someone's family for generations."

Since such a sword of the heirloom is a strong weapon used in an emergency, this term came to have its current meaning.
伝家の宝刀

いざというときに出す、とっておきの切り札のことを、「伝家の宝刀」と言います。

「伝」は "tradition"、「家」は "family/house" を意味し、「伝家」で先祖代々その家に伝わることを意味します。

また、「宝」は "treasure"、「刀」は "sword" を意味するので、「伝家の宝刀」の文字通りの意味は "a treasured sword that has been passed down in someone's family for generations" となります。

家宝として代々伝えられてきた刀はいざというときに使う強力な武器であることから、「伝家の宝刀」は現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 AylesC's correction
Nice writing! Can you give an example of how to use 伝家の宝刀 in a sentence?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

For example, you can use 伝家の宝刀 as follows:
あの野球選手は、ついに伝家の宝刀であるフォークボールを投げた。(That baseball player finally threw his trump card, a forkball.)
AylesC
Oh, I see! Thanks for the example. Easy to understand :)

Shōnenba (正念場 - A Crucial Phase)

Feb 23, 2019 04:04
Shōnenba

In the meeting of my university several days ago, the word 'shōnenba' (正念場) was used to the university operations next fiscal year.

'Shōnenba' means a crucial phase or situation.

'Shōnen' (正念) is a Buddhist term, meaning to seek the right mind or the truth.

In addition, 'ba' (場) means "field" or "situation."

That is to say, 'shōnenba' represents a very important situation that requires the right heart or the truth.

[Example]
'Senkyo ga shōnenba wo mukaeru' (選挙が正念場を迎える - "The election faces a crucial stage").
正念場

先日の大学の会議で、来年度の本学の運営に対して「正念場」という言葉が使われました。

「正念場」とは、ここぞというとても重要な場面や局面を表す言葉です。

「正念」は仏教用語で、正しい心や真理を求めることを意味します。

また、「場」は "field" や "situation" を意味します。

すなわち「正念場」とは、正しい心や真理が必要となる重要な場面というわけです。

【使用例】
選挙が正念場を迎える。
No. 1 petemondrian's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 dec's correction
Toru
Thank you very much for the correction and helpful comments! :)

Katazu wo Nomu (固唾を呑む - Bating One's Breath)

Feb 22, 2019 23:51
Katazu wo Nomu

I am sometimes concerned about what is going to happen and wait with bated breath.

Such an action is referred to as 'katazu wo nomu' (固唾を呑む).

'Kata' (固) means "firm," 'zu' (唾) means "saliva," and 'nomu' (呑む) means "to swallow" or "to drink," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "to swallow one's firm saliva."

Here, 'katazu' (固唾 - literally "firm saliva") is saliva that accumulates in your mouth when you are nervous.

If you are concerning about what is going to happen, you probably swallow your 'katazu'.

Because of this, 'katazu wo nomu' came to have its current meaning.
固唾を呑む

私は時折、事の成り行きが気掛かりで、息を凝らして見守ることがあります。

このようなことを、「固唾を呑む」と言うことができます。

「固」は "firm"、「唾」は "saliva"、「呑む」は "swallow/drink" を意味するので、この表現の文字どおりの意味は "to swallow one's firm saliva" となります。

ここで「固唾」とは、緊張した際に口の中に溜まる唾のことです。

事の成り行きが心配であると、きっとこの固唾を呑みこむことになると思います。

このことから、「固唾を呑む」は現在の意味を持つようになりました。
No. 1 petemondrian's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 dec's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know that! :)

Kamatoto (かまとと - Playing Innocent)

Feb 21, 2019 20:45
Kamatoto

When someone (especially a woman) pretends she does not know something even if she knows it well, we call her 'kamatoto' (かまとと).

'Kama' (かま) is short for 'kamaboko' (かまぼこ - "boiled fish paste"), and 'toto' (とと) is a baby word to mean "fish."

'Kamaboko' is the common Japanese food made from fish paste.

However, in the Edo period, a prostitute said in a very artificial way "かまぼこ was made from とと?" to pretend she was ignorant of the world.

It is said that the word 'kamatoto' was borne from the story.
かまとと

知っているのに知らないふりをして、うぶらしくふるまう人(特に女性)のことを「かまとと」と言うことがあります。

「かま」は「かまぼこ」の略、「とと」は「魚」を意味する幼児語です。

かまぼこは、魚のすり身から作られた庶民の食べ物です。

しかし、江戸時代にある遊女が世間知らずを装うため、「かまぼこはととからできているの?」とわざとらしく聞いたそうです。

このことから、知っているのに知らないふりをすることを意味する「かまとと」という言葉が生まれたとされています。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Very good :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Udatsu ga Agaranai (うだつが上がらない - Never Get Ahead)

Feb 20, 2019 21:26
Udatsu ga Agaranai

I will move to a different university in a few months, but my title will not change.

When someone can't get ahead or raise the status like this, you can express the situation using the phrase 'udatsu ga agaranai' (うだつが上がらない - literally means "udatsu does not raise").

There are several theories about its etymology, but one of them is as follows:

'Udatsu' (うだつ) is a small pillar/decoration with a small roof placed on the roof of a traditional Japanese house, and people who lived in the house which was raising 'udatsu' on the roof was wealthy.

Because of this, 'udatsu ga agaranai' came to mean that someone does not wealthy, then it came to have its current meaning.
うだつが上がらない

私はもうすぐ違う大学に移りますが、役職名は変わりません。

このように、なかなか出世したり地位が上がらないことを、「うだつが上がらない」と言います。

語源には諸説ありますが、その中の一つは以下のとおりです。

「うだつ」とは、屋根の上に設ける小屋根付きの小柱や装飾のことであり、これが上がっている家は裕福でした。

このことから、「うだつが上がらない」は裕福でないことを意味するようになり、現在の意味で使われるようになったというわけです。
No. 1 カラス's correction
面白かった!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Yūmei Mujitsu (有名無実 - Titular)

Feb 19, 2019 22:52
Yūmei Mujitsu

I ate a famous food last week, but it was not delicious at all.

Something famous but superficial is referred to as 'yūmei mujitsu' (有名無実).

'Yū' (有) means "there is" or "exist," and 'mei' (名) means "name," so the literal meaning of the combination means "there is a name" or "name exists" -- it actually means "famous" or "well-known."

'Mu' (無) means "no" or "nothing," and 'jitsu' (実) means "content," so the combination means "no content."
('Mujitsu' is also used to mean "innocent.")

That is to say, 'yūmei mujitsu' means "it is famous but is void of content."
有名無実

私は先週、有名な食べ物を食べましたが、まったく美味しくありませんでした。

このように、有名だけれども内実を伴っていないもののことを、「有名無実」と言います。

「有」は "there is" や "to exist"、「名」は "name" を意味するので、「有名」の文字通りの意味は "there is a name" や "name exists" であり、実際には "famous" や "well-known" などを意味します。

「無」は "no" や "nothing"、「実」は "content" を意味するので、「無実」は "no content" を意味します。
(「無実」は "innocent" を意味することも多いです。)

したがって、「有名無実」とは "It is famous, but is void of content" (有名だが、中身がない)ということを意味するわけです。
No. 1 Rosie's correction
What did you eat which was yumei mujitsu?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I ate Sparus aurata fillet at a famous restaurant in a European country, but I was not fond of it.

Japanese Airline

Feb 18, 2019 11:26
Japanese Airline

I have been to overseas three times by airplane so far.

All airlines that I used were very cheap (low-cost carrier, LCC), but in this business trip, I boarded an airplane operated by the Japanese airline, ANA (All Nippon Airways).

In addition to the expensive fee, it was not wide because it was an economy class, but the service was polite, and the flight was very comfortable.

Incidentally, when boarding an airplane using public research fundings, basically we have to choose an economy class.

Someday, I would like to use a business class or a first class (or a premium economy class).
日本の航空会社

私はこれまで3回、飛行機で海外に行ったことがあります。

これまではすべて格安の航空会社を利用していましたが、今回初めて、日本の航空会社であるANA(全日空)の飛行機に乗りました。

少し料金は高めであり、エコノミーなのであまり広くはありませんが、とても快適なフライトでした。

ちなみに、公的研究費で飛行機に乗る場合は、基本的にエコノミークラスしか選択することができません。

いつか、ビジネスクラスやファーストクラスに乗ってみたいものです。
No. 1 Aubrey's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 thethinker83's correction
It's the same for me--when I travel on business, I have to fly economy class due to public funding sources.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Business class might be too expensive compared to economy class.

Suri (スリ - Pickpocket)

Feb 17, 2019 14:10
Suri

Today is the last day of my stay in Italy, and I will visit Venice.

In sightseeing areas where there are many people such as Venice, you have to be careful about 'suri' (スリ).

'Suri' means an act of stealing money or goods from someone's bag or pocket without being seen, or a person who does that.

There are several theories about its etymology, but one theory explains that it comes from the fact that 'karada wo kosuri tsukeru' (体を擦り付ける - literally means "to rub one's body (against other's body)" while stealing.

Incidentally, according to the Internet, suris (pickpockets) in Venice pretend to tourists, so you need to pay close attention.
スリ

今日はイタリア滞在の最終日で、ヴェネツィアを訪れる予定です。

ヴェネツィアのように人の多い観光地では、「スリ」に気をつけなければなりません。

「スリ」とは、他人の鞄や懐から金品などを気付かれないように盗み取る行為や、そのような行為を行う人を意味する言葉です。

語源は諸説ありますが、ある説は「盗む際に体をこすりつけることから」と説明しています。

ちなみに、インターネットによるとヴェネツィアのスリは観光客や親子連れを装っているらしいので、細心の注意を払う必要があります。
No. 1 Lydia's correction
It's good advice! Nice English. :)
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)
No. 2 nagi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the usage of the word "internet"!

Hōmu shikku (ホームシック - Homesickness)

Feb 17, 2019 01:44
Hōmu shikku

Five days have passed since I came to Italy, and I am gradually becoming 'hōmu shikku' (ホームシック).

'Hōmu shikku' is a nostalgic feeling that you want to back to your hometown or home, and it comes from the English term "homesick."

However, note that "homesick" is an adjective, whereas 'hōmu shikku' is a noun. (In other words, 'hōmu shikku' can be translated as "homesickness.")

Incidentally, you can say 'kaikyō-byō' (懐郷病) instead of 'hōmu shikku'.

Since 'kai' (懐) means "nostalgia," 'kyō' (郷) means "home/hometown," and 'byō' (病) means "sick," the literal meaning of the combination is "a sick that you feel nostalgic about your home/hometown."
ホームシック

イタリアに来て5日が経ち、私は若干ホームシックになりつつあります。

「ホームシック」とは、家庭や故郷を懐かしむ心情のことで、英語の "homesick" から来ています。

ただし、英語の "homesick" は形容詞である一方、日本語の「ホームシック」は名詞として扱われます(すなわち英語の "homesickness" に対応します)。

ちなみに、「ホームシック」のことを「懐郷病」と言うこともできます。

「懐」は "nostalgia"、「郷」は "home/hometown"、「病」は "a sick that you feel nostalgic about your home/hometown" を意味するので、「懐郷病」の文字どおりの意味は "" となります。
No. 1 SkyStormsong's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 Natkal's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Makuhiki (幕引き - Closing a Curtain)

Feb 15, 2019 22:07
Makuhiki

The academic conference in which I am participating is approaching 'makuhiki' (幕引き).

'Makihiki' means that things or events end.

Since 'maku' (幕) means "curtain" and 'hiki' (引き) means "to draw," the literal meaning of the combination is "to draw a curtain" or "to lower a curtain."

Originally, this term meant to lower the curtain of a play to end it, or a person who had a role of that.

From that, its meaning was extended, and it has been used to not only plays but also various things or events.
幕引き

現在参加している学会も、間もなく「幕引き」です。

「幕引き」とは、物事が終りを迎えることを意味する言葉です。

「幕」は "curtain"、「引き」は "to draw" を意味するので、「幕引き」の文字どおりの意味は "to draw a curtain" や "to lower a curtain" となります。

もともとこの言葉は、芝居などで幕を引いて終わらせることや、その役割の人のことを意味していました。

後に、意味が広がり、芝居だけでなくさまざまな物事に対しても使われるようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Eric's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 tony's correction
"Lowering a curtain" has the same idiomatic meaning in English.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the fact! :)
tony
いいえ、どういたしまして。

Ikken Rakuchaku (一件落着 - Problem Solved)

Feb 15, 2019 07:31
Ikken Rakuchaku

Today, my presentation at an academic conference was finally finished.

To describe such a situation, you can use the four-character idiom 'ikken rakuchaku' (一件落着).

'I/ichi' (一) means "one," 'ken' (件) means "case," 'raku' (落) means "to fall," 'chaku' (着) means 'to land,' so the literal meaning of this idiom is "one case falls and lands."

Here, 'rakuchaku' (落着) is an idiom meaning that something is settled or resolved.

That is to say, 'ikken rakuchaku' means that one thing/case is settled or solved.
一件落着

今日、学会での発表が終わりました。

今の私の状況を表す四字熟語に、「一件落着」があります。

「一」は "one"、「件」は "case"、「落」は "to fall"、「着」は "to land" を意味するので、「一件落着」の文字どおりの意味は "one case falls and lands" となります。

ここで、「落着」はおさまりがつくことや、解決することを意味する熟語です。

すなわち「一件落着」とは、 ある物事が決着または解決するということです。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 KiwiChalmers's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Nigashita Sakana wa Ookii (逃した魚は大きい)

Feb 14, 2019 04:41
Nigashita Sakana wa Ookii

Today, I knew that I missed a very big chance.

However, something that you were about to get but missed may looks greater than it is.

There is a proverb to express the fact; it is 'nigashita sakana wa ookii' (逃がした魚は大きい).

'Nigashita' (逃がした) means "missed," 'sakana' (魚) means "fish," and 'ookii' (大きい) means "big," so the literal meaning of this proverb is "the missed fish was big."

Anyway, in order not to regret, I will try to seize a chance as soon as it comes in front of me.
逃した魚は大きい

私は今日、とても大きなチャンスを逃していたことを知りました。

しかし、手に入りそうで逃したものは、大きく見えるのかもしれません。

そのようなことを表すことわざに「逃した魚は大きい」があります。

「逃した」は "missed"、「魚」は "fish"、「大きい」は "big" を意味するので、このことわざの文字どおりの意味は "the missed fish was big" となります。

どちらにしても、後悔をしないために、次にチャンスが目の前に来たらすぐに手を伸ばそうと思います。
No. 1 icarus07's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 iveskins's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Bottakuri (ぼったくり - RIp-Off)

Feb 12, 2019 23:51
Bottakuri

I am in Italy now.

Unfortunately, today I experienced 'bottakuri' (ぼったくり) at a pizza store.

'Bottakuri' means to be requested an exorbitant fee.

I ordered one kebab of four euros.

After placing the money on a tray, it was picked up by the store owner.

In addition, when the kebab was made, he further claimed four euros.

I complained several times that I had already paid for the kebab, but he did not get my message.

Probably, the first four euros on which I placed was regarded as a payment for a pizza of another person (In fact, another person ordered and received a piece of pizza, and it seemed that he did not pay money).

Eventually, I paid eight euros in total -- it was very frustrating.
ぼったくり

私は今、イタリアにいます。

そして、あるピザ屋さんで「ぼったくり」にあってしまいました。

「ぼったくり」とは、法外な料金を要求することを意味する日本語です。

私は4ユーロのケバブを一つ注文しました。

注文後すぐにお金をレジに置いたら、お金は回収されました。

そしてケバブが完成したとき、さらに4ユーロを請求されました。

私はもう既に払っただろうと何度か訴えましたが、店主は聞く耳を持ってくれませんでした。

恐らくですが、私が最初に置いたお金は、別の人のピザ代として計上されたのかもしれません(別の人がピザを一切れ頼んでいて、彼はお金を払っていないように見えた)。

結局合計8ユーロ支払うことになってしまって、悔しいです。
No. 1 Eric's correction
I'm surprised that they didn't have any way of keeping track how much you paid. The store I work at usually gives people another sandwich for free if they didn't like the one they got even if they don't have a receipt to prove it. That store owner is pretty bad at customer service or his business is tanking hard if four euros is going to break his bank xD
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, I was also surprised by the sloppy work. I hope that other stores are not like this...

Kara Shucchō (カラ出張 - A Fake Business Trip)

Feb 11, 2019 12:42
Kara Shucchō

I work at a university and sometimes go on a business trip using public research spending.

Unfortunately, 'kara shucchō' (カラ出張) is often taken up as a problem in Japan.

'Kara' (カラ/空) means "empty" and 'shucchō' (出張) means "business trip," so the literal meaning of 'kara shucchō' is "an empty business trip."

As its literal meaning implies, 'kara shucchō' means a fraudulent act of claiming expenses such as transportation or accommodation expenses, despite not actually going on a business trip.

Of course, if you do 'kara shucchō' and someone finds it, you will be strictly punished.

Incidentally, since I will go on a business trip to Italy for a week from tomorrow, the frequency of posting on Lang-8 might be reduced.
カラ出張

私は大学に勤めており、公的研究費で出張をすることがあります。

残念なことに、日本では「カラ出張」がよく問題になっています。

「カラ」は "empty"、「出張」は "business trip" を意味するので、「カラ出張」の文字どおりの意味は "an empty business trip" となります。

この言葉は、「実際には出張をしていないにもかかわらず、交通費や宿泊費などの経費を請求する不正行為」を表します。

もちろん、カラ出張が発覚したら厳正に処罰されます。

ちなみに、私は明日から約一週間イタリアに出張に行くため、その間投稿が疎かになるかもしれません。
No. 1 Eleni's correction
What an interesting new phrase! Thanks for that! I am also currently at a university, and there are very strict rules about using funding for trips. We have to submit lots of receipts, and often we need to wait for approval before we even buy tickets. Apparently these procedures are in place because a few decades ago the university misused lots of funds from the navy and spent them on frivolous things. So this is definitely a problem here as well!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and comment!
Yes, I feel that similar problems are occurring all over the world. Sadly, the rules are getting more and more strict because of a few bad people.

Sihan Seiki (四半世紀 - Quarter-Century)

Feb 10, 2019 23:49
Sihan Seiki

Today, I found the expression 'shihan seiki' (四半世紀) when reading a novel.

'Shi' (四) means "four," 'han' (半) means "half," and 'seiki' (世紀) means "century."

I think that it is easy to guess what it means -- 'shihan seiki' means a quarter of a century, that is, twenty-five years.

In many cases, we just say 'nijū-go nen' (25年 - literally means "twenty-five years"), but by using 'shihan seiki', the wording/sentence will become more formal.

In addition, it can emphasize the length of the 25 years.
四半世紀

今日、小説を読んでいると「四半世紀」という言葉を見かけました。

「四」は "four"、「半」は "half"、「世紀」は "century" を意味します。

想像に難くないかもしれませんが、「四半世紀」は一世紀の四分の一、すなわち「25年」を意味します。

多くの場合、単に「25年」という表現を使いますが、「四半世紀」を使うことでよりフォーマルな言葉遣い・文章になります。

さらに、25年という年月の長さを強調することができます。
No. 1 JT's correction
Great! That's interesting.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Yatsuatari (八つ当たり - Misdirected Anger)

Feb 9, 2019 22:12
Yatsuatari

Today, I did an act called 'yatsuatari' (八つ当たり).

'Yatsuatari' means that when you get angry with something, you lose calmness and take your anger out on unrelated people for no reason.

'Yatsu' (八つ) means "eight" and 'atari' (当たり) means "to hit" or "to bump," the literal meaning of 'yatsuatari' is "to bump something eight times (or eight directions)."

In Japan, when describing every direction in the surroundings, we use the number eight, such as 'happou' (八方 - literally "eight directions")

That is to say, 'yatsuatari' implies that you take your anger out toward surroundings.
八つ当たり

私は今日、「八つ当たり」をしました(反省しています)。

「八つ当たり」とは、何かに腹を立てたときに、冷静さを失い、関係のない人にまで怒りや不満をぶつけることを意味します。

「八つ」は "eight"、「当たり」は "to hit/bump" を意味するので、「八つ当たり」の文字どおりの意味は "to bump something eight times (or eight directions)" となります。

日本では、周囲のあらゆる方向を意味するとき「八方」のように、八という数字を使います。

すなわち「八つ当たり」とは、周囲のさまざまな方向に向けて見境なく怒りをぶつけることを示唆しているわけです。
No. 1 BOK's correction
A very interesting expression! Thank you for sharing!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Jigou Jitoku (自業自得 - Having It Coming)

Feb 9, 2019 00:36
Jigou Jitoku

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese idiom 'boketsu wo horu' (墓穴を掘る), which means to make a factor that ruins yourself with your own hands.

Today, I would like to talk about the four-character idiom 'jigou jitoku' (自業自得), which has a similar meaning to 'boketsu wo horu'.

'Ji' (自) means "oneself," 'gou' (業) means "deed," and 'toku' (得) means "profit."

Originally, this idiom was a Buddhist term and is usually used to mean that your good or bad deed give you what you deserve.

However, these days, this idiom is usually used to mean that you pay a price for your bad behavior.
自業自得

昨日は、自らの手で身を滅ぼす原因を作ることを意味する「墓穴を掘る」という慣用句を紹介しました。

今日は、「墓穴を掘る」と同様の意味を持つ四字熟語「自業自得」を紹介します。

「自」は "oneself"、「業」は "deed"、「得」は "profit" を意味します。

もともとこの言葉は仏教用語で、「自身が行った善悪の報いは、自分自身が受ける」ことを意味していました。

しかし現在では、悪い報いを受けることを意味する言葉として使われることがほとんどです。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
You reap what you sow.
Good one! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Haha, yes. I often sow seeds of topics.

Boketsu wo Horu (墓穴を掘る - Digging One's Own Grave)

Feb 7, 2019 22:18
Boketsu wo Horu

I sometimes do an act that is referred to as 'boketsu wo horu' (墓穴を掘る) in Japanese.

'Boketsu wo horu' is an idiom that means to make a factor that ruins yourself with your own hands.

'Bo' (墓) means "grave" or "burial," 'ketsu' (穴) means "hole" or "pit," and 'horu' (掘る) means "to dig," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "to dig a burial pit/grave."

It is omitted in the Japanese writing, but this idiom implies that the burial pit/grave is one's own.

In English, it can be translated as "to dig one's own grave" or "to dig oneself into a hole."
墓穴を掘る

私はたまに、墓穴を掘ります。

「墓穴を掘る」とは、自らの手で身を滅ぼす原因を作ることを意味する慣用句です。

「墓」は "grave" や "burial"、「穴」は "hole" や "pit"、「掘る」は "to dig" を意味するので、この慣用句の文字どおりの意味は "to dig a burial pit/grave" となります。

日本語では省略されていますが、この慣用句の墓穴は、自分自身のものを示唆しています。

英語では、"to dig one's own grave" や "to dig oneself into a hole" のように言うことができます。
No. 1 Eric's correction
Let me know if you have any questions!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Ippai Ippai (いっぱいいっぱい - Having One's Hands Full)

Feb 6, 2019 18:31
Ippai Ippai

I have been in a state called 'ippai ippai' (いっぱいいっぱい).

'Ippai ippai' means that there is almost no time to do something or something has reached the limitation.

'Ippai' (いっぱい) is written as 一杯 in kanji -- 'i/ichi' (一) means "one" and 'pai/hai' (杯) means "cup" or "bowl," so the literal meaning of the combination is "a cup of something" or "a bowl of something."

In addition, the characters 一杯 can mean that a cup/bowl is full of something.

That is to say, 'ippai ippai' implies that such a state of limit.
いっぱいいっぱい

私は今、「いっぱいいぱい」の状態に陥っています。

「いっぱいいっぱい」とは、少しの余裕もないさまや、何かが最大限まで達しているさまを表す言葉です。

「いっぱい」を漢字で書くと「一杯」であり、「一」は "one"、「杯」は "cup" や "bowl" を意味するので、「一杯」の文字どおりの意味は "a cup of something" や "a bowl of something" となります。

また、「一杯」という字は、容器に何かが満ち溢れるほど入っていることを表すこともできます。

「いっぱいいっぱい」は、そのような限界の状態を示唆しているというわけです。
No. 1 David's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Ah, I made a mistake.
I think "implies that something has reached its limits" is closest to what I wanted to say.

Tsutsu Uraura (津津浦浦 - All Over the Country)

Feb 5, 2019 15:49
Tsutsu Uraura

To describe "all over the country" or "throughout the land," you can use the four-character idiom 'tsutsu uraura' (津津浦浦).

'Tsu' (津) means a dock or a harbor, and 'ura' (浦) means a cove or a coast, so the literal meaning of this idiom is "harbors and coasts."

Japan is an island country and is surrounded by the sea.

Because of this, marine traffic using ships in Japan has been developed for a long time ago, and there are many docks throughout this country.

The idiom 'tsutsu uraura' was borne from this fact.

You can also write it as 津々浦々 by using 々, which means repetition.
津津浦浦

全国のいたるところや、全国のすみずみを意味する四字熟語に、「津津浦浦」があります。

「津」は船着場や港、「浦」は入江や海岸のことを意味します。

島国である日本は、海に囲まれています。

このため、日本では古くから船を用いた海上交通が発展し、全国のいたるところに船着場があります。

この事実から、「津津浦浦」は上述の意味を持つようになったというわけです。

繰り返しを意味する「々」を用いて、「津々浦々」と書くこともできます。
No. 1 Oceansea's correction
You write very well! My suggestions today are not to fix mistakes. They are only ideas that I think sound a little nicer.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments!
I learned something new! :)

Chinese New Year

Feb 4, 2019 23:00
Chinese New Year

Today is the eve of Chinese New Year.

Chinese (Lunar) New Year is celebrated in several Asian countries, such as China, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, etc.

In particular, China celebrates grandly it -- seven days from the eve of Chinese New Year are holidays in China.

Since there are Chinese students in my laboratory, they held a sui-gyoza (水餃子 - boiled pot stickers) party today.

We ate a lot of sui-gyoza, and now we are being so full.

I feel sorry that they can't rest for seven days because they live in Japan.
旧正月

今日は旧正月の大晦日です。

旧正月は、中国や台湾、韓国、シンガポール、マレーシア、ベトナムなどで祝います。

特に中国では、大晦日から7日間の連休となっており、盛大に祝います。

私の研究室には中国人の留学生がいるため、今日は研究室で水餃子パーティが行われました。

大量の水餃子を食べて、とてもお腹が膨れました。

日本に住んでいる彼らは7日間も休めないので、少しかわいそうです。
No. 1 veri's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
veri
You’re welcome 😊
No. 2 臭豆腐's correction
In Chinese, fried dumplings are called “鍋貼” (pot-stickers) because they stick to the frying pan. People want them to stick to the pan so that the skin will be crisp. But if boiled dumplings stick to the pot they are ruined, so 水餃 (boiled dumplings) are not called pot stickers (鍋貼) in China.

Are 水餃子 called 鍋貼 in Japan?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

I understand. I should have not used "pot stickers" because they don't stick to the pan.
In Japan, pot stickers (鍋貼) are called yaki-gyoza (焼餃子), and boiled dumplings are called sui-gyoza (水餃子). What we ate were just boiled dumplings.

Ehoumaki (恵方巻 - Lucky Direction Roll)

Feb 3, 2019 20:31
Ehoumaki

February 3rd is 'setsubun' (節分).

Setsubun is the day before the beginning of spring (February 4th), and various traditional events are held on this day.

Among them, 'ehoumaki' (恵方巻) is familiar to Japanese people.

'E' (恵) means "lucky," 'hou' (方) means "direction," and 'maki' (巻) means "roll."

Ehoumaki is a sushi roll which is considered to bring good luck by eating it silently while facing the direction ehou.

I also ate ehoumaki today.

However, in recent years, the massive disposal of unsold ehoumaki has been a problem.
恵方巻

今日、2月3日は節分です。

「節分」とは立春(2月4日)の前日のことであり、この日にはさまざまな伝統行事が行われます。

その中でも代表的なものに、「恵方巻」があります。

「恵」は "lucky"、「方」は "direction"、「巻」は "roll" を意味します。

「恵方巻」は、節分に恵方を向いて無言で食べると縁起が良いとされる太巻き寿司のことです。

私も今日、恵方巻を食べました。

しかし、近年では売れ残った恵方巻の大量廃棄が問題となっています。
No. 1 Kreol's correction
Wow, it is a really fascinating tradition.
Toru
Thank you so much for checking my post! :)

Yuiitsu Muni (唯一無二 - One and Only)

Feb 2, 2019 23:36
Yuiitsu Muni

If you want to express something that is only one thing in the world, you can use the four-character idiom 'yuiitsu muni' (唯一無二).

'Yui' (唯) means "only," 'itsu/ichi' (一) means "one," 'mu' (無) means "nothing" or "no," and 'ni' (二) means "two."

Therefore, 'yuiitsu' (唯一) means "only one," 'muni' (無二) means "there are not two," and the combination is "it is only one, there are no same things."

This idiom is often used when describing a very important thing.

You can translate it into English as "one and only."
唯一無二

この世でただ一つしかないものを表す四字熟語に、「唯一無二」があります。

「唯」は "only"、「一」は "one"、「無」は "nothing/no"、「二」は "two" を意味します。

このため、「唯一」は "only one"、「無二」は "there are not two" という意味であり、「唯一無二」は "it is only one, there are no same things" となります。

この熟語は、とても大切なものを表現する際によく使います。

英語では "one and only" と表現することができます。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
I prefer saying one in a million, even though your translation is more accurate
Toru
Thank you for letting me know the nice expression! :)
No. 2 jeemeegee's correction
Good! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Mondō Muyō (問答無用 - No Discussion)

Feb 1, 2019 23:32
Mondō Muyō

To mean that discussion is pointless, you can use the four-character idiom 'mondō muyō' (問答無用).

'Mon' (問) means "question," 'dō/tō' (答) means "answer," 'mu' (無) means "no" or "nothing," and 'yō' (用) means "errand" or "need."

Therefore, 'mondō' (問答) means "questions and answers," 'muyō' (無用) means "unnecessary," and the combination means "unnecessary discussion."

This idiom is often used to end a wasteful discussion forcibly.

[Example of use]

'Ryokō saki wa kanojo ga mondō muyō de kimeta' (旅行先は彼女が問答無用で決めた - "My girlfriend decided the trip destination with no discussion").
問答無用

話し合っても無意味であることを意味する四字熟語に「問答無用」がありなす。

「問」は "question"、「答」は "answer"、「無」は "no/nothing"、「用」は "errand/need" を意味します。

すなわち、「問答」は "questions and answers"、「無用」は "unnecessary"、そして「問答雨用」は "unnecessary discussion" という意味になります。

この熟語は、続けても無駄な議論を強制的に終わらせる際などによく使われます。

【使用例】

旅行先は彼女が問答無用で決めた。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
You should write a mini book on Japanese idioms :)
Good!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Haha, someday I would like to organize my posts. ;)

Tatetsuku (盾突く - Defying)

Jan 31, 2019 22:34
Tatetsuku

To defy or talk back to a person of higher rank is referred to as 'tatetsuku' (盾突く) in Japanese.

'Tate' (盾) means "shield" and 'tsuku' (突く) means "to thrust" or "to prod," so the literal meaning of this term is "to thrust a shield."

In other words, this term implies that you resist against enemy's attacks by thrusting a shield into the ground.

Originally, this was said as 'tate wo tsuku' (盾を突く) with the particle 'wo' (を), but these days, I think that most people say 'tatetsuku' for short.
盾突く

目上の人に対して反抗したり口答えすることを、「盾突く」と言います。

「盾」は "shield"、「突く」は "to thrust" を意味するので、「盾突く」の文字どおりの意味は "to thrust a shield" です。

盾を地面に突き立て、相手の攻撃を防いで抵抗することを表しているというわけです。

本来は助詞の「を」をつけて「盾を突く」という表現でしたが、現在では「盾突く」と言うことがほとんどだと思います。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
I admire people who tatetsuku.
Toru
Yes, it requires a lot of courage.
No. 2 David's correction
It's been quite a while.

How did your presentation, in English, go?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
And it's been a while. :)

I think that my presentation in English finished with no trouble, but I have to do another English presentation two weeks later...

Fumin Fukyū (不眠不休 - Without Sleep or Rest)

Jan 30, 2019 22:58
Fumin Fukyū

When you do something without sleeping or resting, it is referred to as 'fumin fukyū' (不眠不休) in Japanese.

'Fu' (不) is a negative prefix, 'min' (眠) means "to sleep," and 'kyū' (休) means "to rest."

Therefore, 'fumin' (不眠) means "no sleep," 'fukyū' (不休) means "no rest," and the combination means "no sleep no rest" or "without sleep or rest."

Basically, this idiom is used to express that someone makes an effort without rest to achieve something.

However, if you do something without sleep or rest, you cannot concentrate on it, so it is not recommended.

[Example of use]

'Fumin fukyū de hataraku' (不眠不休で働く - I work without sleep or rest).
不眠不休

眠ったり休んだりせずに何かをすることを、日本語で「不眠不休」と言います。

「不」は否定語、「眠」は "to sleep"、「休」は "to rest" を意味します。

このため、「不眠」は "no sleep"、「不休」は "to rest" を意味し、「不眠不休」は "no sleep no rest" という意味になります。

基本的にこの熟語は、何かを達成するために休まず努力することを表す際に使います。

ただ、実際に休んだり眠ったりしないと集中力がもたずパフォーマンスが下がるので、おすすめはできません。

【使用例】

不眠不休で働いている
No. 1 Sterling's correction
This is good to know. Thank you again for sharing it! >^.^<
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Doro no You ni Nemuru (泥のように眠る - Sleeping like a Log)

Jan 29, 2019 22:11
Doro no You ni Nemuru

I will 'doro no you ni nemuru' (泥のように眠る) tonight.

'Do ro no you ni nemuru' means that you have a deep sleep as much as anyone can't awake you.

'Doro' (泥) means "mud," 'no you ni' (のように) means "like," and 'nemuru' (眠る) means "to sleep," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "to sleep like mud."

It is thought that this phrase comes from an imaginary marine creature 泥 (dei), which appears in ancient Chinese stories.

Since this creature has no bones, it would become like mud and stop moving when getting out of the sea.
泥のように眠る

私は今晩、「泥のように眠る」と思います。

「泥のように眠る」とは、多少のことでは起きないほどぐっすり眠ることを意味します。

「泥」は "mud"、「のように」は "like"、「眠る」は "to sleep" を意味するので、「泥のように眠る」の文字どおりの意味は "to sleep like mud" となります。

この言葉は、中国故事に出てくる想像上の海中生物「泥(でい)」から来ていると考えられています。

この生物は骨がなく、海から出ると泥のようになり動けなくなるそうです。
No. 1 Sterling's correction
It is a wonderful phrase to learn. Thank you! >^.^<
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Asu wa Wagami (明日は我が身 - Tomorrow It Might Be Me)

Jan 28, 2019 18:05
Asu wa Wagami

Have you ever seen someone's misfortune in front of you?

You might think that it is just an event of other people and does not concern you, but a similar misfortune could befall you in the near future.

'Asu wa wagami' (明日は我が身) is a Japanese phrase that admonishes people for such a possibility.

'Asu' (明日) means "tomorrow," 'waga' (我が) means "my," and 'mi' (身) means "body."

That is to say, 'asu wa wagami' literally says that it might happen to my body tomorrow.
明日は我が身

他人の不幸を目の当たりにしたことはありますか?

あなたはそれを他人事だと思っているかもしれませんが、同じような不幸が、近い内にあなた自身に降り掛かってくるかもしれません。

そのようなことを戒める言葉に、「明日は我が身」があります。

「明日」は "tomorrow"、「我が」は "my"、「身」は "body" を意味します。

すなわち「明日は我が身」とは、"it might happen to my body tomorrow" というわけです。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
When I see other people's misfortune, I feel a vague sense of schadenfreude
Toru
"Schadenfreude" is a new word for me. Thank you for letting me know that. :)
It is called 'meshiuma' (メシウマ) in Japanese.
No. 2 jeemeegee's correction
Good post! I may never learn Japanese but little sayings are always interesting to know. Thanks!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and your kind comments!
I learned something new! (^^)

Kinou no Kyou (昨日の今日 - A Short Period)

Jan 27, 2019 13:28
Kinou no Kyou

Today, I would like to talk about a little weird Japanese expression, 'kinou no kyou' (昨日の今日).

Since 'kinou' (昨日) means "yesterday" and 'kyou' (今日) means "today," the literal meaning of 'kinou no kyou' is "yesterday and today" or "yesterday's today."

Can you imagine what does it actually mean?

Actually, it says that it has only been a day since something happened yesterday.

That is to say, this expression means a short period or duration.

[Example sentence]

'Kinou no kyou de kare wa iken ga kawatta' (昨日の今日で彼は意見が変わった - He changed his opinion in a short period.)
昨日の今日

今日は、少し奇妙な日本語の表現「昨日の今日」を紹介します。

「昨日」は "yesterday"、「今日」は "today" を意味するので、「昨日の今日」の文字どおりの意味は "yesterday and today" や "yesterday's today" となります。

この表現が実際には何を意味するか、想像できますか?

実は、「昨日何かが起こって、そこからまだ1日しか経っていない」ということを言っています。

すなわち、「何かがあって間もなく」という意味を持つというわけです。

【例文】

昨日の今日で、彼は意見を変えた。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Nice! Thanks! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
jeemeegee
You're welcome!

Keizoku wa Chikara Nari (継続は力なり - Practice Makers Perfect)

Jan 26, 2019 14:52
Keizoku wa Chikara Nari

This is my 1500th post.

Today I would like to introduce the phrase 'keizoku wa chikara nari' (継続は力なり), which is the motto of many people.

'Keizoku' (継続) means "continuity," 'chikara' (力) means "power," and 'nari' (なり) means "to be," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "continuity is power."

As the literal meaning says, this phrase represents the importance of continuing for anything.

It can be translated in English as "persistence pays off," "practice makes perfect," or "endurance makes you stronger."
継続は力なり

今日で1500回目の投稿になります。

今日は、座右の銘にしている人も多い「継続は力なり」という言葉を紹介します。

「継続」は "continuity"、「力」は "power" を意味するので、「継続は力なり」の文字どおりの意味は "continuity is power" となります。

この言葉は文字どおり、どんなことでも継続することが重要であることを表しています。

英語では "persistence pays off" や "practice makes perfect"、"endurance makes you stronger" のように訳されます。
No. 1 Sterling's correction
It is well written and true. Thank you for sharing it! >^.^<
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Mimi ga Itai (耳が痛い - Being Ashamed to Hear)

Jan 25, 2019 18:06
Mimi ga Itai

When someone's remarks or criticisms hit your sensitive or weak point, and it is harsh for you to hear that, you can use the Japanese idiom 'mimi ga itai' (耳が痛い) to describe the situation.

'Mimi' (耳) means "ear" and 'itai' (痛い) means "to hurt" or "to feel painful," so the literal meaning of 'mimi ga itai' is "to feel pain on one's ear."

This idiom implies that you feel pain on your ear when you hear what you don't want to hear.

Of course, you can also use this expression when your ear physically hurts.
耳が痛い

誰かの発言や批判が自分の弱みをついていて、聞くことが辛いことを、「耳が痛い」と表現します。

「耳」は "ear"、「痛い」は "to hurt" や "to feel pain" を意味するので、「耳が痛い」の文字どおりの意味は "to feel pain on one's ear" となります。

聞くことが辛いのを、耳の痛みにたとえているというわけです。

もちろん、耳が物理的に痛い場合にも、「耳が痛い」と言うことができます。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Hana no Shita wo Nobasu (鼻の下を伸ばす - Spoony)

Jan 24, 2019 21:01
Hana no Shita wo Nobasu

When you womanize or have a loose face due to an attractive woman, it can be described as an idiom, 'hana no shita wo nobasu' (鼻の下を伸ばす).

'Hana' (鼻) means "nose," 'shita' (下) means "under," and 'nobasu' (伸ばす) means "to stretch/extend," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "to stretch/extend the area under one's nose."

In fact, when a man is attracted by a woman, his face would be loosened, and the area under his nose would seem to be stretched.

Because of this, 'hana no shita wo nobasu' came to have its current meaning.
鼻の下を伸ばす

女性にだらしないさまや、好みの女性を前にして顔が緩むことを、「鼻の下を伸ばす」と言います。

「鼻」は "nose," 「下」は "under"、「伸ばす」は "to stretch/extend" を意味するので、この慣用句の文字どおりの意味は "to stretch/extend the area under one's nose" です。

実際、女性の色気に心を奪われている人は、顔が緩み、鼻の下が伸びたように見えます。

このことから、「鼻の下を伸ばす」は上記のような意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 thethinker83's correction
This reminds me of all those cartoons where a male character sees an attractive woman and their eyes pop out of their heads, their jaws drop to the ground, and their tongues roll out of their mouths. :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I can image these cartoons easily, haha. However, I think that they are also surprised simultaneously. On the other hand, this idiom is used when you are embarrassed. I found a tweet related to this idiom.
https://twitter.com/dizzy_ziddy/status/993047830942990337
thethinker83
Thanks for sharing.
Yes, you're right. Their expressions in those cartoons were exaggerated compared to a face you would describe as 鼻の下を伸ばす.

Hana wo Oru (鼻を折る - Cropping Someone's Feathers)

Jan 23, 2019 17:52
Hana wo Oru

Continuing from yesterday's post, I would like to talk about an idiom related to nose, 'hana wo oru' (鼻を折る).

'Hana' (鼻) means "nose" and 'oru' (折る) means "to break," so the literal meaning of 'hana wo oru' is "to break one's nose."

Of course, you can use this phrase to mean to break someone's nose physically.

However, it is often used to mean to subdue someone's pride.

People who take pride in something is described as 'hana ga takai' (鼻が高い - literally "one's nose is high").

That is to say, 'hana wo oru' implies that you break someone's high nose.
鼻を折る

昨日に引き続き、今日は「鼻を折る」という慣用句を紹介します。

「鼻」は "nose"、「折る」は "to break" を意味するので、「鼻を折る」の文字どおりの意味は "to break one's nose" となります。

もちろん、この言葉は文字どおり、物理的に誰かの鼻を折ることを意味することもあります。

しかし、実際には「得意がっているものをへこませて、恥をかかせる」ことを意味することが多いです。

得意がっている人は鼻を高くします。

「鼻を折る」とは、その高くなった鼻をへし折るということです。
No. 1 えみ's correction
It's kind of funny to think of the literal meaning of these phrases!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, idioms are interesting. :)

Hana ga Magaru (鼻が曲がる - Bad Smelling)

Jan 22, 2019 17:38
Hana ga Magaru (鼻が曲がる)

These days, I have written about Japanese idioms that use "nose."

Today, I would like to talk about 'hana ga magaru' (鼻が曲がる).

Since 'hana' (鼻) means "nose" and 'magaru' (曲がる) means "to be bent," the literal meaning of this idiom is "one's nose is bent."

Actually, 'hana ga magaru' can express that there is a terrible odor.

This comes from the fact when someone notices a bad odor, his/her nose would get distorted.

[Example sentence]
Kono yasai wa hana ga magaru youna nioi da (この野菜は鼻が曲がるような臭いだ - This vegetable has an awful smell).
鼻が曲がる

最近私は、「鼻」に関する慣用句を投稿し続けています。

今日は、「鼻が曲がる」を紹介します。

「鼻」は "nose"、「曲がる」は "to be bent" を意味するので、「鼻が曲がる」の文字どおりの意味は "one's nose is bent" となります。

実際には、「悪臭があまりにひどいさま」を表します。

これは、ひどい悪臭をかぐとき、人の鼻が歪むことに由来します。

[例文]
この野菜は鼻が曲がるような臭いだ。
No. 1 えみ's correction
I knew this idiom, but I never thought of the reasoning behind it! Haha :P
えみ
  • This comes from the fact that when someone notices a bad odor, his/her nose would get distorted. he/she would scrunch up his/her nose.

    Do you mean 「鼻にしわを寄せる」(scrunch up one's nose)?

Sorry, I just saw your Japanese text, so ignore the question! You would describe that type of facial expression as scrunching up one's nose.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the new word! (^^)
No. 2 Oceansea's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and explanation!
I understand well. :)

Hana ni Tsuku (鼻につく - Getting Annoyed)

Jan 21, 2019 18:47
Hana ni Tsuku

When feeling annoyed with someone's words or behavior, you can express it by using the Japanese idiom 'hana ni tsuku' (鼻につく).

Since 'hana' (鼻) means "nose" and 'tsuku' (つく) means "to be attached," the literal meaning of 'hana ni tsuku' is "something is attached to one's nose."

Here, what is attached to one's nose implies "smell."

If a peculiar smell is attached to your nose, you will be annoyed because the smell will stay for a while.

Because of this, 'hana ni tsuku' came to have the above meaning.
鼻につく

誰かの言動や振る舞いがうっとうしくて嫌に感じるとき、「鼻につく」という慣用句を使うことがあります。

「鼻」は "nose"、「つく」は "to attach" を意味するので、「鼻につく」の文字どおりの意味は "something attaches to one's nose" となります。

ここで、鼻につくものは、「匂い」であることを暗に意味しています。

匂いが鼻につくと、なかなか取れず気になって、うっとおしく感じます。

このことから「鼻につく」は、上記のような意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)

Hana de Warau (鼻で笑う - Snorting with Laughter)

Jan 20, 2019 21:08
Hana de Warau

It is not a good deed, but have you ever sneer or mock at someone?

You can express it by using the Japanese idiom 'hana de warau' (鼻で笑う).

'Hana' (鼻) means "nose" and 'warau' (笑う) means "to laugh," so the literal meaning of 'hana de warau' is "to laugh using one's nose."

When people sneer/mock at someone or express a scornful feeling, they give a snort.

The idiom 'hana de warau' was derived from this fact.

It can be translated into English as "to snort with laughter" or "to laugh through one's nose."
鼻で笑う

あまり良い行為ではありませんが、誰かを見下して嘲り笑ったことはありますか?

そのような行動は、日本語で「鼻で笑う」と言います。

「鼻」は "nose"、「笑う」は "to laugh" を意味するので、「鼻で笑う」の文字どおりの意味は "to laugh using one's nose" となります。

人は誰かを馬鹿にしたり、嘲りの気持ちを表すとき、鼻から息をふんと出します。

「鼻で笑う」は、この事実から生まれた言葉というわけです。

英語で "to snort with laughter" や "to laugh through one's nose" と言うこともできます。
No. 1 iamspart's correction
I didn't know this. Very interesting, thank you!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Hiza ga Warau (膝が笑う - One's Knees Shake)

Jan 19, 2019 21:06
Hiza ga Warau

When exercising suddenly or imposing a load on your feet, your knees could wobble/shake regardless of your own will.

To describe such a situation, you can use the Japanese idiom 'hiza ga warau' (膝が笑う).

'Hiza' (膝) means "knee" and 'warau' (笑う) means "to laugh," so the literal meaning of 'hiza ga warau' is "one's knees laugh."

As you might have guessed, this idiom describes the shake of knees by using the verb "laugh."

Incidentally, there are mainly three kinds of onomatopoeia to describe the shake of knees -- 'kaku kaku' (カクカク), 'gaku gaku' (ガクガク), and 'puru puru' (プルプル).
膝が笑う

急激に運動をしたときや、足に疲れがたまったとき、自分の意志とは関係なく膝がブルブルと震えた経験はありますか?

そのような状態になることを、日本語で「膝が笑う」と表現します。

「膝」は "knee"、「笑う」は "to laugh" を意味するので、「膝が笑う」の文字どおりの意味は "one's knees laugh" となります。

すなわちこの言葉は、膝が震えている様子を、膝が笑っていると表現しているわけです。

ちなみに、膝の震えを表現する擬態語としては、「カクカク」「ガクガク」「プルプル」などがあります。
No. 1 ongakuize's correction
教えてくださってありがとうございます
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Ana ga Attara Hairitai (穴があったら入りたい - I Want to Crawl under a Rock)

Jan 18, 2019 18:28
Ana ga Attara Hairitai

Today, I would like to introduce you to an idiom that expresses one's feeling, so please guess what it means.

The idiom is 'ana ga attara hairitai' (穴があったら入りたい).

Since 'ana' (穴) means "hole," 'attara' (あったら) means "if something is there," 'hairitai' (入りたい) means "I want to get into somewhere," the literal meaning of this idiom is "if there is a hole, I want to get in there."

The actual meaning is that you are so embarrassing that you want to hide yourself by getting into a hole.
穴があったら入りたい

今日は、ある心境を表す慣用句を紹介すので、どんな意味か想像してみて下さい。

その慣用句は、「穴があったら入りたい」です。

「穴」は "hole"、「あったら」は "if something is there"、「入りたい」は "I want to get into somewhere" を意味すのので、この慣用句の文字どおりの意味は "If there is a hole, I want to get in there."

実際には、穴に入って身を隠したいほど恥ずかしい心境を表します。
No. 1 neal's correction
Good job ! ill try and remember this one haha :D
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 Oceansea's correction
Toru
Ah, I made a fatal mistake.
Thank you for pointing that out! :)

Hokusoemu (ほくそ笑む - Smiling Inwardly)

Jan 17, 2019 23:41
Hokusoemu

Have you ever smiled inwardly as a result of something going well as expected?

Such an act is called 'hokusoemu' (ほくそ笑む) in Japanese.

'Emu' (笑む) means "to smile."

'Hokuso' (ほくそ) comes from the Chinese 北叟 (hokusō - meaning "an old man live in the North"), which especially refers to an old man 塞翁 (Saiou) in ancient Chinese stories.

Since Saiou (hokusō) always smiled inwardly even if good or bad things happened, the term 'hokusoemu' came to have its current meaning.

Incidentally, 'hokusoemu' is the only Japanese term that uses 'hokuso'.
ほくそ笑む

何かがうまくいき、一人ひそかに笑ったことはありますか?

そのような行為を日本語で「ほくそ笑む」と言います。

「笑む」は、"to smile" を意味します。

そして「ほくそ」は、北方に住む老人を意味する「北叟」のことであり、ここでは特に中国故事に登場する「塞翁」のことを指します。

塞翁は、良いことがあっても悪いことがあっても、いつもうすら笑みを浮かべていたため、「ほくそ笑む」という言葉が生まれたそうです。

「ほくそ」という言葉は、日本語ではこの「ほくそ笑む」の中でだけ使われます。
No. 1 Sarah's correction
That's very interesting! I don't know if we have a similar saying in English.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 jeemeegee's correction
Good posts! Keep it up! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Shinsan wo Nameru (辛酸を嘗める - Having a Hard Time)

Jan 16, 2019 19:27
Shinsan wo Nameru

Yesterday, I introduced the idiom 'amai shiru wo suu' (甘い汁を吸う), which means to get profits without struggling.

Since 'amai' (甘い) means "sweet," 'shiru' (汁) means "juice," and 'suu' (吸う) means "to suck," the literal meaning of this idiom is "to such sweet juice."

There is another idiom that used a similar wording of this -- it is 'shinsan wo nameru' (辛酸を嘗める).

Since 'shin' (辛) means "hot/spicy," 'san' (酸) means "sour," and 'nameru' (嘗める) means "to lick," the literal meaning of this idiom is "to lick something hot or sour."

It is painful for many people to lick hot or sour things, so this idiom means to have a hard time.
辛酸を嘗める

昨日は、「苦労せずに利益を得る」ことを意味する「甘い汁を吸う」という言葉を紹介しました。

「甘い」は "sweet"、「汁」は "juice"、「吸う」は "to suck" を意味するので、この言葉の文字どおりの意味は "to such sweet juice" になります。

これと似た言い回しの言葉に、「辛酸を嘗める」があります。

「辛」は "hot/spicy"、「酸」は "sour"、「嘗める」は "to lick" を意味するので、この言葉の文字どおりの意味は "to lick something hot or sour" となります。

辛いものや酸っぱいものをなめるのは(人によるかもしれませんが)つらく苦しいため、「辛酸を嘗める」はつらい目に遭うことや、苦労をすることを意味します。
No. 1 Oceansea's correction
Okay, I will try to use this idiom!

毎日、日本語の勉強は辛酸を嘗める。
It is hard studying Japanese everyday. (But I like learning!)

If I made a mistake, please give me an example sentence. =)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! And nice try!

> 毎日、日本語の勉強は辛酸を嘗める。
Unfortunately, this usage of 辛酸を嘗める is a bit unnatural. 辛酸を嘗める implies that you are in an unhappy situation.

For example, I think that the following sentence is fine.
母親にやりたくもない日本語の勉強を強要されて、辛酸を嘗めている。
(My mother forces me to study Japanese which I do not want to learn. That time is hard/painful.)

Amai Shiru wo Suu (甘い汁を吸う - Lining One's Pockets)

Jan 15, 2019 20:06
Amai Shiru wo Suu

There are people who take an action which is expressed as 'amai shiru wo suu' (甘い汁を吸う) in Japanese.

'Amai' (甘い) means "sweet," 'shiru' (汁) means "juice" or "soup," and 'suu' (吸う) means "to suck," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "to suck sweet juice."

Here, "sweet juice" implies profits.

That is to say, 'amai shiru wo suu' means to get profits without struggling.

You can also say 'umai shiru wo suu' (うまい汁を吸う), by using 'umai' (うまい - literally "delicious") instead of 'amai'.
甘い汁を吸う

世の中には「甘い汁を吸う」人がいます。

「甘い」は "sweet"、「汁」は "juice" や "soup"、吸うは "to suck" を意味するので、「甘い汁を吸う」の文字どおりの意味は "to suck sweet juice" となります。

ここで「甘い汁」は、「利益」などを示唆しています。

すなわち「甘い汁を吸う」とは、他人を利用して、自分は苦労せずに利益を得ることを意味します。

「甘い」の代わりに "delicious" を意味する「うまい」を用い、「うまい汁を吸う」と言うこともあります。
No. 1 Yogian's correction
Good job. Interesting too. Thanks. Idioms are interesting.
Toru
Thank you for the comment! (^^)
No. 2 Oceansea's correction
I will try to use this idiom too.

Hmm...

あそこの人は、仕事で甘い汁を吸いいました。

If I made a mistake, plese give me an example sentence, and I will try again.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

> あそこの人は、仕事で甘い汁を吸いいました。
「吸いいました」 should be 「吸いました」, but I think this sentence is perfectly fine except that!

Gishin Anki (疑心暗鬼 - Doubts Beget Doubts)

Jan 14, 2019 18:18
Gishin Anki

Today, I saw a person who has a mind called 'gishin anki' (疑心暗鬼).

This four-character idiom mean to be afraid of trivial things or suspect everything.

'Gi' (疑) means "suspicion," 'shin' (心) means "heart" or "mind," 'an' (暗) means "dark," and 'ki' (鬼) means "ogre."

In other words, 'gishin anki' implies a mind of suspecting that there is an ogre because of the darkness.

Originally, this idiom was used as a Buddhist term to mean to have a suspecional mind to the truth of Buddhism.
疑心暗鬼

私は今日、「疑心暗鬼」になっている人を見ました。

「疑心暗鬼」とは、疑わしいことがきっかけで、なんでもないことを怖いと思ったり、疑わしいと感じてしまうことを意味します。

「疑」は "suspicion"、「心」は "heart/mind"、「暗」は "dark"、「鬼」は "ogre" を意味します。

すなわち「疑心暗鬼」とは、暗いというだけで鬼がいるのではないかと疑う心を表しています。

もともとは、仏教の真理に対して疑いの心を持つことを意味する仏教用語として使われていました。
No. 1 SallyG's correction
Your English is very good! You have a few things to work out in order to make it sound 100% natural, but you are on your way. :) Good luck with your studies!!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments!
I'm glad to hear you say that. (^^)
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
疑心暗鬼ってことね。So that means something like "jumping at shadows", huh. Thank you, Toruさん!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the interesting phrase! :)

Hara wo Kukuru (腹をくくる - Bracing Oneself)

Jan 13, 2019 23:53
Hara wo Kukuru

Following yesterday and the day before yesterday, I would like to talk about an idiom that is related to "stomach."

Today's idiom is 'hara wo kukuru' (腹をくくる).

'Hara' (腹) means "stomach" and 'kukuru' (くくる) means "to tie up something" or "to bind up something," so the literal meaning of 'hara wo kukuru' is "to tie up one's stomach."

However, same on the previous occasion, 'hara' (腹 - "stomach") means "feelings," "mind," or "heart."

Therefore, the actual meaning of this idiom is "to brace oneself."

To describe it, you can also say "to roll up one's sleeves" in English.
腹をくくる

昨日と一昨日に引き続き、今日も「腹」に関する慣用句を紹介します。

今日の慣用句は「腹をくくる」です。

「腹」は "stomach"、「くくる」は "to tie/bind up something" を意味するので、「腹をくくる」の文字どおりの意味は "" です。

しかし、前回と同様「腹」は「心」や「精神」を意味します。

したがって実際には、この慣用句は「気持ちを引き締める」や「覚悟を決める」といったことを意味します。

英語で "to roll up one's sleeves" (袖をまくる) と言うこともできます。
No. 1 CoolBreezeBC's correction
No. 2 Clover's correction

Hara wo Yomu/Hara wo Saguru (腹を読む/腹を探る - Reading One's Mind/Sounding out One's Mind)

Jan 12, 2019 21:52
Hara wo Yomu/Hara wo Saguru

In Japan, long ago it was thought that the stomach contains one's feelings or mind, and there are many idioms using 'hara' (腹 - meaning "stomach").

Today I would like to introduce you to two idioms among them, 'hara wo yomu' (腹を読む) and 'hara wo saguru' (腹を探る).

'Yomu' (読む) means "to read," and 'saguru' (探る) means "to search."

The literal meaning of 'hara wo yomu' is "to read one's stomach," and its actual meaning is "to read one's mind."

The literal meaning of 'hara wo saguru' is "to search one's stomach," and its actual meaning is "to sound out one's mind."
腹を読む/腹を探る

日本では、「腹」の中には感情や本心が収められていると考えられており、「腹」に関する慣用句が多く存在します。

今日はその中から、「腹を読む」と「腹を探る」を紹介します。

「腹」は "stomach"、「読む」は "to read"、「探る」は "to search" を意味します。

「腹を読む」の文字どおりの意味は "to read one's stomach" で、実際の意味は "to read one's mind" です。

「腹を探る」の文字どおりの意味は "to search one's stomach" で、実際の意味は "to sound out one's mind" です。
No. 1 Judy's correction
Judy
Your English is already very good. You should challenge yourself and write more complex essays.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. I will challenge step by step.
No. 2 CoolBreezeBC's correction
Literal quotation requires " ... " and paraphrase quotation ' ... '.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

Previously, I learned that foreign languages (such as Japanese) should be written in italics, but we cannot use italics on Lang-8, so in my posts, I've used single quotes instead of italics for Japanese terms. When my posts on Lang-8 move to my blog, the single quotes are changed to italics.

Futoppara (太っ腹 - Generous)

Jan 11, 2019 23:22
Futoppara

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese idiom 'hara ga futoi' (腹が太い), which means that one's heart/capacity is large.

There is another Japanese term, 'futoppara' (太っ腹), which is very similar to 'hara ga gutoi'.

'Futo' (太) means "large," "thick," or "wide," and 'hara/para' (腹) means "stomach" or "belly."

As you can guess, both 'futoppara' and 'hara ga futoi' are composed of the same two words, 腹 and 太.

These meanings are almost the same, but 'futoppara' is often used to mean that someone is generous
太っ腹

昨日は、度量が大きいことを意味する「腹が太い」という言葉を紹介しました。

これとよく似た言葉に、「太っ腹」があります。

「太」は "large/thick/wide"、「腹」は "stomach/belly" を意味します。

ご想像のとおり、「太っ腹」と「腹が太い」を構成する単語は同じです。

意味もほぼ同じですが、「太っ腹」は「気前が良い」という意味で使われることが多いです。
No. 1 Sam's correction
That's interesting.

Does this mean that what's considered a "big heart" in the west is considered to be in the stomach in Japan, as in that's where your generosity and kind nature lives? Interesting how they're in very similar locations.
Toru
Thank you for the comment. :)

Yes, since Japanese people believed that hearts/minds are in our stomachs/livers, there are many idioms using stomachs that describe emotions or personalities.
Sam
Cool, I've been reading your latest entries. It's amazing how many expressions there are!
No. 2 jenappelle's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 3 ocean's correction
面白かったです!ありがとうございました。
Toru
  • These meanings are almost the same, but 'futoppara' is often used to mean that someone is generous...

    ...whereas 'hara ga futoi' describes...?

    (Since you've set up a comparison and say the meaning of the two words are very similar, the idea in the second part of the sentence seems a bit unfinished)

Thank you so much for the correction!
Indeed, I should have added a sentence something like "..., whereas 'hara ga futoi' usually means to have a big heart."

Hara ga Futoi (腹が太い - One's Heart is Large)

Jan 10, 2019 23:04
Hara ga Futoi

There is an idiom, 'hara ga futoi' (腹が太い) in Japanese.

'Hara' (腹) usually means "stomach" or "belly," but here it implies "heart" or "capacity."

In addition, 'futoi' (太い) means "large," "thick," or "wide."

That is to say, 'hara ga futoi' is a compliment that means "one's heart/capacity is large."

However, it could literally mean that one's belly is big, so please be careful when you use this idiom.

Incidentally, in several areas of western Japan, 'hara ga futoi' is used to mean to have a full stomach.
腹が太い

日本語には「腹が太い」という慣用句があります。

「腹」は通常 "stomach" や "belly" を意味しますが、ここでは「度量」や「胆力」のことを表しています。

また、「太い」は "large" や "thick"、"wide" を意味します。

すなわち「腹が太い」とは、「度量が大きい」ということを意味する誉め言葉です。

しかし、場合によっては文字どおり太っていることを意味する可能性もあるので、使い方には注意して下さい。

ちなみに、西日本の一部の地域では、「腹が太い」は「満腹」の意味でも用いられます。
No. 1 daChewyDuck17881's correction
Overall, a very well written English text without any grammar mistakes! I rather suggest that you practice native English writing patterns and do you best to not just translate from Japanese to English (but there is no shame in that!). Keep up the great work! (b ᵔ▽ᵔ)b
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and helpful comments!
I'm glad to hear you say that. (^^)

Tsukeyakiba (付け焼き刃 - Borrowed Wisdom)

Jan 9, 2019 17:02
Tsukeyakiba

Have you ever been hastily acquired knowledge or skill as a stopgap measure?

Such a not-so-great measure is called 'tsukeyakiba' (付け焼き刃) in Japanese.

'Tsuke' (付け) means "attached," 'yaki' (焼き) means "burnt," and 'ba/ha' (刃) means "blade."

In the past, swordsmiths sometimes attached a burnt steel blade to a blunt sword as a stopgap measure.

Swords made by striking metal materials repeatedly were sharp and long-lasting, whereas swords with 'tsukeyakiba' were not durable.

Because of this, inefficient hastily knowledge or skill has come to be referred to as 'tsukeyakiba' (付け焼き刃).
付け焼き刃

その場しのぎのために、間に合わせで一時的な知識や技術を身に着けたことはありますか?

そのようなことを、日本語で「付け焼き刃」と言います。

「付け」は "attached"、「焼き」は "burnt"、「刃」は "blade" を意味します。

かつて刀鍛冶では、切れ味の悪い刀に対して一時しのぎのため、鋼の焼き刃を付け足すことがありました。

切れ味のよく長持ちする刀は地金を何度も打って作られますが、付け焼き刃の刀はすぐに切れなくなったり、そもそも切れ味が悪いです。

ここから、間に合わせの役に立たない知識が技術のことを、「付け焼き刃」と呼ぶようになりました。
No. 1 Jonquil's correction
Overall really well written! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Kaish (会社 - Company)

Jan 8, 2019 23:36
Kaisha

Most adults work at 'kaisha' (会社).

'Kaisha' is an organization established for the purpose of profit and is usually translated into English as "company" or "office."

'Kai' (会) means "to get together" or "to assemble," and 'sha' (社) means "organization."

Originally, both this term and its inverted version 'shakai' (社会) were used in a broad sense, such as "society," "group," and "fellow," as the letters indicate.

However, since the early Meiji era (about 150 years ago), 'kaisha' and 'shakai' have been clearly distinguished -- 'kaisha' means "company" and 'shakai' means "society."
会社

多くの大人は、「会社」で働いています。

「会社」とは、営利を目的に設立した団体のことで、英語では "company" に相当します。

「会」は "to get together"、「社」は "organization" を意味します。

もともとこの言葉は、その字が示しているように、「社会」や「団体」「仲間」など、広い意味を持っていました。

しかし、明治時代(今から約150年前)になると、「会社」は商業的な意味での団体を指す言葉として区別されるようになりました。
No. 1 malinkibear's correction

Namahanka (生半可 - Half-Hearted)

Jan 7, 2019 10:44
Namahanka

If you want to change yourself, you must not have an attitude of 'namahanka' (生半可).

'Namahanka' means that someone/something is halfway, half-hearted, or lukewarm.

In the Edo period, people who displayed a know-it-all attitude about fashion or play were called 'hankatsū' (半可通) with contempt.

'Han' (半) means "half," 'ka' (可) means "possible," and 'tsū' (通) means "acquainted/familiar."

Later, it changed to 'hanka' (半可) by removing 'tsū', then the term 'namahanka' was made by adding 'nama' (生), which means "immature" or "halfway."
生半可

自分自身を変えたいなら、「生半可」な気持ちで臨んではいけません。

「生半可」とは、中途半端なことや、不十分であることを表す言葉です。

江戸時代、おしゃれや遊びについて知ったかぶる人のことを、軽蔑の意味を込めて「半可通」と呼んでいました。

「半」は "half"、「可」は "possible"、「通」は "acquainted/familiar" を意味します。

この「通」が省略されて「半可」となり、「未熟」や「不十分」などの意味を持つ「生」がついて「生半可」になったというわけです。
No. 1 neal's correction
Well done!! :D
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Kado ga Tatsu (角が立つ - Creating Bitter Feelings)

Jan 6, 2019 21:01
Kado ga Tstsu

Yesterday, I introduced you to the idiom 'kado ga toreru' (角が取れる), which means that someone who is harsh comes to have a gentle nature.

Today, I would like to introduce another idiom 'kado ga tatsu' (角が立つ), which also uses 'kado' (角).

Since 'kado' means "corner" and 'tatsu' (立つ) means "to stand" or "to stand out," the literal meaning of 'kado ga tatsu' is "corners stand out."

A spiny situation that corners are standing out implies bad personal relationships.

Because of this, 'kado ga tatsu' means to create bitter feelings and bad relationships.
角が立つ

昨日、性格が穏やかになることを意味する「角が取れる」という慣用句を紹介しました。

今日は、「角」を使った別の慣用句、「角が立つ」を紹介します。

「角」は "corner"、「立つ」は "to stand" や "to stand out" を意味するので、「角が立つ」の文字どおりの意味は "corners stand out" となります。

角が際立って刺々しい状態は、あまり良くない人間関係を暗示します。

このことから、「角が立つ」は人との関係が穏やかでなくなることを意味します。
No. 1 Kento's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 neal's correction
Perfect! i didnt see any mistakes good job :D
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! (^^)

Kado ga Toreru (角が取れる - Mellowing)

Jan 5, 2019 22:13
Kado ga Toreru

When someone who is harsh becomes to have a gentle nature due to his/her life experience, it is expressed as 'kado ga toreru' (角が取れる) in Japanese.

'Kado' (角) usually means "corner," but here it means a sharp point of one's personality.

In addition, 'toreru' (取れる) means "to remove" or "to come off."

Therefore, 'kadoga toreru' means that a sharp part of one's personality removes, in other words, it means that one's personality becomes gentle or mellow.

Incidentally, I watched the movie "A Christmas Carol," and I thought that this term can be is used for Scrooge.
角が取れる

人生経験を経て尖った性格が穏やかになることを、日本語で「角が取れる」と言います。

「角」は "corner" を意味しますが、ここでは性格の尖っている部分のことを表しています。

また、「取れる」は "to remove" や "to come off" を意味します。

したがって「角が取れる」とは、性格の尖っている部分が取れることであり、それはすなわち性格が穏やかになるということです。

私は一昨日、映画「クリスマスキャロル」を見たのですが、スクルージにこの表現が使えると思いました。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Very clear and informative as always
Amop567
Another synonym could be "soften"
Amop567
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
On second thought, I think it would be clearer to translate it as "to be removed"
Toru
Thank you very much for the correction! (^^)

Zettai Zetsumei (絶体絶命 - Certain Death)

Jan 4, 2019 22:49
Zettai Zetsumei

Several days ago, I was being fallen into a situation called 'zettai zetsumei' (絶体絶命) in Japanese.

'Ze/zetsu' (絶) means "to end," 'tai' (体) means "body," 'mei' (命) means "life."

Each idiom, 'zettia' (絶体) and 'zetsumei' (絶命) means "one's body (is about to) ends" and "one's life (is about to) ends," respectively.

In addition, the combination 'zettai zetsumei' means a situation that you are driven to the last extremity and cannot do anything.

People sometimes write 絶対絶命 (zettai zetsumei) using 絶対 (zettai - meaning "definite/absolute") instead of 絶体 (zettai), but note that this is incorrect.
絶体絶命

私は数日前、「絶体絶命」と呼ばれる状況に陥っていました。

「絶」は "to end"、「体」は "body"、「命」は "life" を意味します。

「絶体」は体が絶えること、もしくは今にもそうなりそうな状態を、「絶命」は命が絶えること、もしくは今にもそうなりそうな状態を表す言葉です。

そして「絶体絶命」は、危険・困難な状況に追い詰められ、どうすることもできないさまを表します。

"Definite" や "absolute" を意味する「絶対」を使って「絶対絶命」と書かれることもありますが、これは誤りです。
No. 1 .デイナ.'s correction
This is the first time I've heard of 絶体絶命. It sounds like a stressful situation! Thanks for sharing :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, the situation is very stressful. :)

Isshin Furan (一心不乱 - Heart and Soul)

Jan 4, 2019 10:22
Isshin Furan

Yesterday, I introduced you to the four-character idiom 'chototsu moushin' (猪突猛進), which means to rush headlong into some activity recklessly.

There is another idiom 'isshin furan' (一心不乱), which has a similar meaning to 'chitotsu moushin'.

'I/ichi' (一) means "one," 'shin' (心) means "heart," 'fu' (不) is a negative prefix, 'ran' (乱) means "be confused," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "one heart is not confused."

As the characters imply, 'isshin furan' means that someone concentrates on one thing without being confused by other things.

'Chitotsu moushin' is often used in a negative sense, whereas 'isshin furan' is often used in a positive way.
一心不乱

昨日は、目標に対して向こう見ずに突き進むことを意味する「猪突猛進」という四字熟語を紹介しました。

「猪突猛進」と似た意味を持つ四字熟語に、「一心不乱」があります。

「一」は "one"、「心」は "heart"、「不」は否定語、「乱」は "be confused" を意味するので、「一心不乱」の文字どおりの意味は「一つの心が乱れない」になります。

文字どおりの意味が示すように、「一心不乱」は一つのことに心を集中して、他のことに心を奪われないさまを表す言葉です。

「猪突猛進」は否定的な意味で使われることが多い一方、「一心不乱」は肯定的な意味で使われることが多いです。
No. 1 Jacq's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Chototsu Moushin (猪突猛進 - Rushing Recklessly)

Jan 2, 2019 20:21
Chototsu Moushin

Since the animal symbol of this year is the boar (猪/亥 - read as 'inoshishi/i'), these days we often see the four-character idiom 'chototsu moushin' (猪突猛進).

'Cho' (猪) means "boar," 'totsu' (突) means "rush," 'mou' (猛) means "fierce," 'shin' (進) means "proceed/head."

The combination, 'chototsu moushin', means to rush headlong into a purpose wildly.

This idiom was born from the fact that boars rush straight without looking sideways.

Some people use this idiom in a positive sense, but it is usually used in a negative sense because it contains a nuance that you act without thinking consequences or surroundings.
猪突猛進

今年の干支は猪(亥)であるため、猪にちなんだ「猪突猛進」という四字熟語をよく見かけます。

「猪」は "boar"、「突」は "rush"、「猛」は "fierce"、「進」は "proceed/head" を意味します。

そして「猪突猛進」は、一つの目標に対して、向こう見ずに突き進むことを意味します。

この四字熟語は、猪が脇目も振らずに真っ直ぐに突進する様子から生まれました。

良い意味で使われることもありますが、周囲や後先のことを考えていないというニュアンスを含むため、悪い意味で使われることが多いです。
No. 1 dec's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and helpful comments!
I learned something new. :)
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
The English slang equivalent is to bumrush. Sometimes you need to bumrush when there's nothing to think about, like when you're in a hostage situation and you see a door, you bumrush toward it. No thinking required.
Toru
Thank you for letting me know that!
I had never heard of it. :)

Neshōgatsu (寝正月 - Staying at Home during the New Year's Holiday)

Jan 1, 2019 23:26
Neshōgatsu

Happy New Year.

This year I have done 'neshōgatsu' (寝正月).

'Ne' (寝) means "sleep" and 'shōgatsu' (正月) means "New Year's holiday," the literal meaning of 'neshōgatsu' is "sleeping during the New Year's holiday."

The actual meaning of 'neshōgatsu' is to stay at home during the New Year's holiday.

In Japan, there is a traditional custom that people greet Toshigami-sama (年神様 - literally "god of the incoming year") from December 31st to January 1st, then sleep and stay at home during January 1st.

Therefore, first selling and New Year's events are often held from January 2nd.
寝正月

あけましておめでとうございます。

今年は「寝正月」をしました。

「寝」は "sleep"、「正月」は "New Year's holiday" を意味するので、「寝正月」の文字どおりの意味は "sleeping during the New Year's holiday" となります。

実際の意味は、正月の休みを外出せず、家でゆっくり過ごすことです。

日本では伝統的に、12月31日から1月1日にかけて眠らずに年神様を迎え、1月1日はゆっくり寝て過ごす風習がありました。

そのため、初売りや正月行事は2日から行われることが多いです。
No. 1 Chad's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Ichaicha (いちゃいちゃ - Lovey-Dovey)

Dec 31, 2018 18:38
Ichaicha

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term 'chinchin kamokamo' (ちんちんかもかも), which means that a woman and a man snuggle each other.

There is another term, 'ichaicha' (いちゃいちゃ), which has a similar meaning to 'chinchin kamokamo', and is more commonly used.

Originally, 'ichaicha' was used to mean to argue, but later it has come to mean to make out or snuggle.

Usually, this term is used as 'ichaicha suru' (いちゃいちゃする) by adding 'suru' (する - meaning "do").

Or its verb form 'icha tsuku' (いちゃつく) is used instead.
いちゃいちゃ

昨日は、男女が仲睦まじいさまを表す「ちんちんかもかも」という言葉を紹介しました。

同様の意味を持ち、より日常的に使われる表現に、「いちゃいちゃ」があります。

「いちゃいちゃ」はもともと、言い争うことを意味していたようですが、現代では男女が戯れるさまを意味するようになりました。

"Do" を意味する「する」をつけて「いちゃいちゃする」のように使われることが多いです。

もしくは、動詞形の「いちゃつく」が使われます。
No. 1 jenappelle's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Chinchin Kamokamo (ちんちんかもかも - Making Out/Snuggling)

Dec 30, 2018 23:29
Chinchin Kamokamo

To describe that a woman and a man make out or snuggle each other, you can use the Japanese term 'chinchin kamokamo' (ちんちんかもかも).

'Chinchin' (ちんちん) is an onomatopoeia that means that water is boiling, and it also means a feeling of jealousy.

Furthermore, since you might feel jealous when seeing snuggling couple, 'chinchin' (ちんちん) can also mean such a feeling.

In addition, it is thought that 'kamokamo' (かもかも) is added to 'chinchin' just for adjusting the tones.

Incidentally, if you just say 'chinchin', it can be taken to mean an obscene thing.
ちんちんかもかも

男女が仲睦まじくしているさまを、日本語で「ちんちんかもかも」と言うことがあります。

「ちんちん」はお湯が沸くことを表す擬態語であり、嫉妬ややきもちなども表すことが出来ます。

さらに、男女が仲睦まじいさまを見ると嫉妬してしまうことから、「ちんちん」はそのような男女の仲を表すこともできます。

また、「かもかも」は言葉の調子を整えるために「ちんちん」につけられた語だと考えられています。

「ちんちん」だけだと、卑猥な意味にとられる可能性があるからかもしれません。
No. 1 Moshimoshi's correction
新しい単語を教えてくれてありがとう!^_^
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
Good job!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

> Isn't it true when you put something in the microwave you can say "チンする”?
Yes, since microwaves in Japan emitted the sound チン (which is something like "ring" in English) when heating/warming was completed, we call heating up something in a microwave チンする. However, recent microwaves don't emit such sounds, young people might not understand the phrase チンする.

Kachō Fūgetsu (花鳥風月 - Beauties of Nature)

Dec 29, 2018 23:23
Kachō Fūgetsu

To describe a beautiful landscape of nature, you can use the four-character idiom 'kachō fūgetsu' (花鳥風月).

'Ka' (花) means "flower," 'chō' means "bird," 'fū' (風) means "wind," and 'getsu' (月) means "moon."

This idiom can be divided into two parts: 'kachō' (花鳥) and 'fūgetsu' (風月).

'Kachō' means to enjoy watching nature such as flowers or birds, and 'fūgetsu' means to make poetry about nature such as wind or a moon.

By combining these two idioms, it can mean various beautiful nature.
花鳥風月

自然の美しい風景や風物を表す四字熟語に、「花鳥風月」があります。

「花」は "flower"、「鳥」は "bird"、「風」は "wind"、「月」は "moon" を意味します。

この四字熟語は、「花鳥」と「風月」の2つに分けることができます。

「花鳥」は花や鳥などの風物を鑑賞して楽しむこと、「風月」は風や月など自然の風物を題材に詩歌を作ることを意味します。

この2つが組み合わさることで、自然の美しい風景や、それをたしなむ風流を意味するというわけです。
No. 1 Sarah / 曹晴's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 val's correction
Very good! You had very few grammatical mistakes. Most of the corrections I made were just to make your writing sound more natural.

Also, I recognize these kanji because I am learning Chinese ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

> I am learning Chinese ^^
Nice! By the way, Chinese has a similar idiom, 花鳥雪月.

Kiki Ippatsu (危機一髪 - Having a Close Shave)

Dec 28, 2018 23:42
Kiki Ippatsu

If you want to describe an extremely dangerous situation, you can use 'kiki ippatsu' (危機一髪) in Japanese.

'Ki' (危) means "danger," 'ki' (機) means "moment" or "chance," 'i/ichi' (一) means "one," and 'patsu/hatsu' (髪) means "hair."

That is to say, 'kiki ippatsu' implies that a danger moment is approaching to you, and the distance is as long as one hair.

This idiom is often used to describe the past event, for example, 'kiki ippatsu de tasukatta' (危機一髪で助かった - I had a close shave).
危機一髪

一つ間違えば非常に危ない状況のことを、「危機一髪」と言います。

「危」は "danger"、「機」は "moment/chance"、「一」は "one"、「髪」は "hair" を意味します。

すなわち「危機一髪」は、「髪の毛一本ほどのところに危険が迫っている」ということを示唆しています。

「危機一髪で助かった」のように、過去のことに対して使うことが多いです。
No. 1 bill marie's correction
This is really interesting! I have a question about "危機一髪" now!
Can you use it only in the context of shaving? Or can you use it as a metaphor, too? For example, if you are in a hurry to get on the train, can you say 危機一髪で乗れた? Or is this only for when having a shave?
Fantastic writing! I especially like this part "the distance is as long as one hair."
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

> can you say 危機一髪で乗れた?
This sentence is a little unnatural. I think 危機一髪 is only used for when having a close shave/escape. Instead, 間一髪 can be used in several situations. Since 間 (kan) means a gap, 間一髪 literally means a hairbreadth gap. 間一髪で乗れた is a natural sentence.
bill marie
Thank you so much for teaching me a new Japanese saying?

Kikokushijo (帰国子女 - Returnee Children)

Dec 27, 2018 22:41
Kikokushijo

A child who returned to his/her home country after living another country (at least one year) is called 'kikokushijo' (帰国子女) in Japanese.

'Ki' (帰) means "to return to somewhere" and 'koku' (国) means "country," so 'kikoku' (帰国) means "to return (back) to one's country."

'Shi' (子) usually means "child," but here it means "son."

In addition, 'jo' (女) usually means "woman," but here it means "daughter."

In other words, 'kikokushijo' literally means "a son or a daughter who returned back to the home country."
帰国子女

外国での生活を経て、その後自国に戻ってきた子どものことを、日本語で「帰国子女」と言います。

「帰」は ""、「国」は "country" を意味するので、「帰国」は "" という意味になります。

「子」は 通常 "child" を意味しますが、ここでは特に "son" を意味します。

また、「女」は通常 "woman" を意味しますが、ここでは特に "daughter" を意味します。

すなわち「帰国子女」は文字どおり '" という意味になります。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post again! :)

Taichō/Guai ga Warui (体調/具合が悪い - Feeling Sick)

Dec 26, 2018 17:11
Taichō/Guai ga Warui

These days, I can say 'taichō ga warui' (体調が悪い) about myself.

'Tai' (体) means "body" or "physical being," 'chō' (調) means "condition," 'warui' (悪い) means "bad," so 'taichō ga warui' literally means "one's physical condition is bad."

When you want to say that your physical condition is bad, you can also use 'guai ga warui' (具合が悪い) instead of 'taicho ga warui'.

'Gu' (具/ぐ) means "condition" or "case," and 'ai' (合) means "fit," so the literal meaning of 'guai ga warui' is "one's fit condition is bad."

'Taichō ga warui' can only be used for people, whereas 'guai ga warui' can be used for both people and things.
体調/具合が悪い

ここ最近、私は「体調が悪い」です。

「体」は "body/physical"、「調」は "condition"、「悪い」は "bad" を意味するので、「体調が悪い」 の意味は文字どおり "one's physical condition is bad" となります。

また、「体調が悪い」は「具合が悪い」と言い換えることもできます。

「具」は "condition" や "case"、「合」は "fit" を意味するので、「具合が悪い」の文字どおりの意味は one's fit condition is bad"となります。

「体調が悪い」は人に対してしか使えない一方、「具合が悪い」はものに対しても使うことができます。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
お大事に!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Kotatsu (こたつ)

Dec 25, 2018 17:59
Kotatsu

I spent the winter without 'kotatsu' (こたつ) over the past two years.

However, this year I bought a kotatsu as a Christmas present for myself.

A kotatsu is a kind of Japanese heating equipment and can warm up a portion of space -- it is made by putting a heat source in a table and covering the table with a comforter or something.

Once you enter the kotatsu, it is difficult to get out of there due to the comfort, so kotatsu is sometimes described as 'akuma no kagu' (悪魔の家具 - "devil furniture") or 'hito wo dame ni suru kagu' (人をダメにする家具 - "a piece of furniture that ruins man").

I will start to use it today.
こたつ

私は去年と一昨年、こたつを使わずに冬を越しました。

しかし、今年は自分自身へのクリスマスプレゼントとして、こたつを買ってしまいました。

こたつとは、日本の暖房器具の一つであり、床に置いた枠組み(机)の中に熱源を入れ、外側を布団などで覆って一部の空間を暖かくするものです。

あまりにも快適に感じて一度入るとなかなか抜け出せなくなることから、「人をダメにする家具」や「悪魔の家具」などと呼ばれることもあります。

今日から使い始める予定です。

Kamoku (寡黙 - Silent)

Dec 24, 2018 14:52
Kamoku

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese word 'mukuchi' (無口) which means to talk little or a person who has few words.

However, this word is not used in a positive manner when describing someone.

There is another word 'kamoku' (寡黙), which has a similar meaning to 'mukuchi' and is more formal.

'Ka' (寡) means "less" or "a person who lost his/her partner," and 'moku' (黙) means "to silence."

That is to say, it is thought that 'kamoku' implies that a person who falls silent due to the loss of his/her partner.
寡黙

昨日は、「口数が少ないこと」や「口数が少ない人」を意味する「無口」という言葉を紹介しました。

しかし、「無口」を人に対して使うとあまり良い印象を与えません。

口数の少ない人を表現するよりフォーマルな表現として、「寡黙」があります。

「寡」は少ないことや、夫や妻を失った人のことを、「黙」は "" を意味します。

すなわち、「寡黙」は夫や妻を亡くして黙るさまを暗に意味していると考えられます。
No. 1 Azalya's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for checking my post! :)

Mukuchi (無口 - Having Few Words)

Dec 23, 2018 14:54
Mukuchi

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese 'oshaberi' (おしゃべり), which means to talk a lot about something.

On the other hand, if you want to mean to talk little, you can use the word 'mukuchi' (無口).

Since 'mu' (無) means "nothing" and 'kuchi' (口) means "mouth," the literal meaning of 'mukuchi' is "nothing mouth."

Just like 'oshabery' can mean a person who talks a lot, 'mukuchi' can also mean a person who talks little.

However, we often call such a person 'mukuchi na hito' (無口な人), by adding 'hito' (人 - literally meaning "person")
無口

昨日は、口数多く話すことを意味する「おしゃべり」という言葉を紹介しました。

逆に、口数の少ないことを表したい場合、「無口」という言葉を使います。

「無」は "nothing"、「口」は "mouth" を意味するので、「無口」の文字どおりの意味は "nothing mouth" となります。

「おしゃべり」が「口数の多い人」を表したように、「無口」も「口数の少ない人」を表すことができます。

しかし、"person" を意味する「人」をつけて、「無口な人」と使うことも多いです。
No. 1 petrichor-x's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Oshaberyi (おしゃべり - Gabbing/Babbler)

Dec 22, 2018 21:25
Oshaberi

I am not a person called 'oshaberi' (おしゃべり ) very much.

'Osyaberi' is a word made by adding the polite prefix 'o' (お) to 'shaberi' (しゃべり), which is the noun form of the verb 'shaberu' (喋る - literally means "to talk").

That is to say, 'oshaberi' means to talk a lot about something or talk about something lightly.

In addition, 'oshaberi' can be used to mean a person who has a loose tongue or big mouth.

Since this word is not used in a good sense when describing someone, please be careful when you use it.
おしゃべり

私はあまり「おしゃべり」ではありません。

「おしゃべり」は、口数多く話すことを意味する「喋る」の名詞形「しゃべり」に、丁寧の接頭辞「お」をつけた言葉です。

このため、「おしゃべり」は「口数多く何かを話すこと」や「軽々しく何かを話すこと」を意味します。

また、そのような人を意味することもできます。

人に対してはあまり良い意味では使われないので、注意して下さい。
No. 1 bunnie's correction
This was really well-written and informative!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Harawata ga Niekuri Kaeru (はらわたが煮えくり返る - Boiling with Anger)

Dec 21, 2018 22:16
Harawata ga Niekuri Kaeru

Today, I was about to 'harawata ga niekuri kaeru' (はらわたが煮えくり返る).

'Harawata ga niekuri kaeru' means to feel anger boiling up inside someone.

'Harawata' (はらわた) means "guts/bowels," 'nie' (煮え) means "to boil," 'kaeru' (返る) means "to turn over," and 'kuri' (くり) is a term to strengthen 'nie' and 'kaeru'.

In other words, 'harawata ga niekuri kaeru' means that someone's guts/bowels boil up and turn over.

Since "guts/bowels/stomach" imply heart or mind in Japan, this phrase has the meaning of "anger."
腸が煮えくり返る

私は今日、腸が煮えくり返りそうになりました。

「はらわたが煮えくり返る」とは、抑えがたい怒りを感じるさまを表す言葉です。

「はらわた」は "guts/bowels"、「煮え」は "to boil"、「返る」は "to turn over"、そして「くり」は「煮え返る」を強めるはたらきを持ちます。

すなわち「はらわたが煮えくり返る」の文字どおりの意味は "someone's guts/bowels boil up and turn over" となります。

日本では内臓やお腹は心や精神を表すことから、この表現は「怒り」を意味を持つというわけです。
No. 1 Gin Kitsune's correction
So interesting! Thanks for sharing!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Houfuku Zettou (抱腹絶倒 - Holding One's Stomach and Laughing)

Dec 20, 2018 15:57
Houfuku Zettou

Have you ever had a big laugh enough to roll around a floor?

To describe such a laugh, you can use the four-character idiom 'houfuku zettou' (抱腹絶倒).

'Hou' (抱) means "to hold something," 'fuku' (腹) means "stomach," 'ze/zetsu' (絶) means "very" or "surely," and 'tou' (倒) means "to turn over," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "someone turns over while holding his/her stomach."

Originally, another kanji 捧 (meaning "to hold something with both hands") was used instead of 抱.

However, since 抱 was more common and was widely used, 捧腹絶倒 changed to 抱腹絶倒.
抱腹絶倒

転げ回るほど大笑いしたことはありますか?

そのようなことを表す四字熟語に「抱腹絶倒」があります。

「抱」は "to hold something"、「腹」は "stomach"、「絶」は "very/surely"、「倒」は "to turn over" を意味するので、この熟語の文字通りの意味は "someone turns over while holding his/her stomach" となります。

もともと「抱」は、両手で何かを抱えることを意味する「捧」という字が使われていました。

しかし、「抱」という字のほうが広く使われる一般的なものであるため、「捧腹絶倒」が「抱腹絶倒」に変化したそうです。
No. 1 EishaGee's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 Fifi's correction
Hah, we say ROFL for that in emails. Rolling on floor laughing.
Toru
Thank you very much for letting me know the phrase! (^^)

Rekki toshita (れっきとした - Respectable/Authentic)

Dec 19, 2018 23:30
Rekki toshita

When describing that someone is highly respectable or something is authentic with no shadow of doubt, you can say 'rekki toshita' (れっきとした) in Japanese.

Originally, 'rekki' was written as 歴 in kanji, and was read as 'reki'.

The character 歴 has the meaning of "clear" or "obvious".

In addition, 'toshita' (とした) means that something is being so.

Because of this, 'rekki toshita' came to mean that someone/something is obviously respectable/authentic.

For example, you can say 'kare wa rekki toshita isha da' (彼はれっきとした医者だ - "He is a highly respectable doctor."
れっきとした

何かが疑う余地もなく確かであることを形容するための日本語に、「れっきとした」があります。

「れっき」はもともと漢字で「歴」と書き、「れき」と読まれていました。

「歴」という字には、「はっきりと」や「明らかな」という意味があります。

また、「とした」は何かがそのようであることを意味します。

ここから、「れっきとした」は何かが確かなものであることを表すようになったというわけです。

例えば、「彼はれっきとした医者だ」のように言うことが出来ます。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction

Tassha (達者 - Skillful)

Dec 18, 2018 15:55
Tassha

Previously, I introduced you to the parting greeting phrase 'otassha de' (お達者で), which is used for a person we won't see again for a long time.

Since 'tassha' (達者) means that your body is strong, 'otasshade' (お達者で - "being tassha") means "please be healthy."

However, the original meaning of 'tassha' is different.

'Ta/tatsu' (達) means "to be enlightened" or "to be familiar with something," and 'sha' (者) means "person."

In other words, the literal meaning of 'tassha' is a person who is good at doing something.
達者

以前私は、長い間会わなくなる相手に対する別れの挨拶「お達者で」を紹介しました。

「達者」は「体が丈夫なこと」を意味するので、「お達者で」は「健康でいてください」ということを意味します。

しかし、本来「達者」は別のことを意味する言葉でした。

「達」は「悟る」や「物事に通じている」ことを意味し、「者」は「人」を意味します。

すなわち「達者」の文字どおりの意味は「物事に熟達している人」です。
No. 1 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Umi no Mokuzu (海の藻屑 - Being Drowned at Sea)

Dec 17, 2018 18:26
Umi no Mokuzu

To die due to a marine accident is called 'umi no mokuzu ni naru' (海の藻屑になる) in Japanese.

'Umi' (海) means "sea," 'mo' (藻) means "alga," 'kuzu' (屑) means "scrap," and 'naru' (なる) means "to become."

That is to say, the literal meaning of this phrase is "to become scrap algae at sea."

Incidentally, there is another Japanese term 'mozuku' (モズク), which means "nemacystus decipiens."

Since 'mozuku' is a kind of seaweeds and its sound is similar to 'mokuzu', some people say 'umi no mozuku to naru' by mistake.
海の藻屑

海難事故で死んでしまうことを、日本語で「海の藻屑になる」と言います。

「海」は "sea"、「藻屑」は "scrap alga"、「になる」は "to become" を意味します。

すなわち、「海の藻屑になる」の文字どおりの意味は "to become scrap algae" となります。

ちなみに、日本語には "nemacystus decipiens" を意味する「モズク」という言葉があります。

「モズク」は海藻であり、かつ「藻屑」と発音がよく似ているため、「海の藻屑」を「海のモズク」と言い間違える人もいます。
No. 1 Will's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Miotosu/Minogasu (見落とす/見逃す - Missing)

Dec 16, 2018 22:33
Miotosu/Minogasu

Today, I was checking again the corrections that I received on Lang-8.

At that time, I found that I forgot to say "Thank you" for about 20 corrections.

I replied to them, but I feel sorry for not being able to notice them soon.

Like this case, to miss something is said as 'miotosu' (見落とす) or 'minogasu' (見逃す) in Japanese.

'Mi' (見) means "look," 'otosu' (落とす) means "drop," and 'nogasu' (逃す) means "miss."

Both of them have the meaning of "to miss something," but 'miotosu' can also mean to pretend not to see something.
見落とす/見逃す

今日、私は Lang-8 上で受けた添削を見直していました。

すると、約20個ほど、"Thank you" の返事をし忘れている添削がありました。

気が付いたものには返事をしましたが、遅くなってしまったことを申し訳なく思います。

このように、何かに気づかないでいることを日本語で「見落とす」もしくは「見逃す」と言います。

「見」は "look"、「落とす」は "drop"、「逃す」は "miss" を意味します。

「見落とす」と「見逃す」はどちらも同じ意味を持ちますが、「見逃す」は「見て見ぬふりをする」ことを意味することもできます。
No. 1 Woobl's correction
勉強になりました

I also noticed I missed saying thank you on a correction, but it was from a year ago. I think it would be stranger if I thanked him now!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
After replying, some users told me "Better late than never" :)

Ki ga Fureru (気が触れる - Losing One's Mind)

Dec 15, 2018 22:20
Ki ga Furetu

Today, I was about to take an act called 'ki ga furetu' (気が触れる).

'Ki ga furetu' means to lose one's mind or become crazy.

'Ki' (気) in 'ki ga futeru' means "mind" or "spirit."

'Fureru' (触れる) means "to touch" in most cases, but it can also mean "to be crazy."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'ki ga fureru' is "one's mind becomes crazy."

In present Japan, I think that 'ki ga hureru' is the only idiom that uses the verb 'fureru' as the meaning of "to be crazy."
気が触れる

私は今日、気が触れそうになりました。

「気が触れる」とは、正気でなくなることを意味します。

「気」は "mind" や "spirit" を意味します。

「触れる」はほとんどの場合 "to touch" を意味しますが、"to be crazy" を意味することもできます。

すなわち「気が触れる」の文字どおりの意味は、 "one's mind becomes crazy" となります。

現代の日本において、「触れる」が「狂う」の意味を持つのは、「気が触れる」という表現の中くらいだと思います。
No. 1 mare's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Akakara Nabe (赤から鍋 - A Red Hot Pot)

Dec 14, 2018 23:40
Akakara Nabe

Today I ate 'akakara nabe' (赤から鍋).

'Akakara nabe' is a kind of dish that is popular in Nagoya, Aichi, and is a very hot pot made by blending red 'miso' (味噌 - bean paste) and red pepper.

'Aka' (赤) means "red," 'kara' (から) means "hot" or "spicy," and 'nabe' means "hot pot," so the literal meaning of 'akakara nabe' is "a red hot pot."

In fact, it is red and hot.

Today was a very cold day, but I was able to warm my blood by eating this meal.
赤から鍋

今日は、「赤から鍋」を食べました。

「赤から鍋」とは愛知県名古屋の名物で、赤味噌と赤唐辛子をブレンドしたとても辛い鍋です。

「赤」は "red," 「から」は "hot" や "spicy," 「鍋」は "hot pot" を意味するので、「赤から鍋」の文字どおりの意味は "a red hot pot" となります。

実際、赤から鍋は赤くて辛い鍋です。

今日はとても寒い日でしたが、この鍋を食べて体を温めることができました。

Makahushigi (摩訶不思議 - Mysterious)

Dec 13, 2018 22:25
Makahushigi

There are many 'makahushigi' (摩訶不思議) in the world.

"Makahushigi" means that something is very mysterious or wonder.

Since 'hushigi' (不思議) means "wonder" or "mysterious," you can easily guess that 'maka' (摩訶) is a word to enogasuse the 'hushigi'.

In fact, 'maka' comes from the Sanskrit term "maha", which means "great," "very," "amazing."

For example, you can use this term like 'Maka hushigi na dekigoto ga okita' (摩訶不思議な出来事が起きた - A very mysterious event happened).

Incidentally, it is said that 'makahushigi' is originally used to mean "wonderfulness that is beyond human understanding."
摩訶不思議

世の中には「摩訶不思議」なことがたくさんあります。

「摩訶不思議」とは、何かが非常に不思議なことを表す言葉です。

「不思議」は "wonder" や "mystery" を意味するため、「摩訶」は「不思議」を強めるための語であると想像できると思います。

実際、「摩訶」は「非常に」「偉大な」「素晴らしい」を意味するサンスクリット語の "maha" から来ています。

例えば、「摩訶不思議な出来事が起きた」のように使います。

また、「摩訶不思議」はもともと、「人知を超えた素晴らしさ」を意味するために使われていたようです。
No. 1 Gin Kitsune's correction
So interesting!
Are you learning US English? For UK and Australian English, you would write: ... the Sanskrit term "maha", which means "great", "very", and/or "amazing". (Punctuation goes outside quotation marks unless it is part of the quote).
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, I have learned the US English. A lang-8 user taught me that in the US, punctuation (almost) always goes inside quotation.
Gin Kitsune
Yes, for US and I think Canadian English, that is correct! :)

Uto Uto and Utsura Utsura (「うとうと」「うつらうつら」 - Drowsy)

Dec 12, 2018 21:05
Uto Uto and Utsura Utsura

Yesterday, I introduced you to the term 'inemuri' (居眠り), which means to fall asleep unwillingly when doing something.

To express the state of 'inemuri', you can use the Japanese onomatopoeia, 'uto uto' (うとうと) or 'utsura utsura' (うつらうつら).

'Uto uto' describes that you drift into a light sleep.

'Utsura utsura' describes that you drift in and out of dreamland.

Both of them imply that you are half awake and half asleep, but the former focuses on half sleeping, whereas the latter focuses on half awakening.
「うとうと」と「うつらうつら」

私は昨日、何かをしている最中に寝てしまうことを意味する「居眠り」という言葉を紹介しました。

この「居眠り」の状態を表す擬態語に、「うとうと」と「うつらうつら」があります。

「うとうと」は、浅い眠りについているさまを表します。

「うつらうつら」は、浅い眠りにひきこまれ、意識がはっきりしないさまを表します。

どちらも似た意味を有しますが、「うとうと」は半分眠っていることを、「うつらうつら」は半分起きていることを強調しています。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good!!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Inemuri (居眠り - Snooze/Doze)

Dec 11, 2018 15:38
Inemuri

Today, I did 'inemuri' (居眠り) for just a few minutes.

Inemuri means to fall asleep unwillingly when doing something (especially at school or work).

'I' (居) means "stay" and 'nemuri' (眠り) means "sleep," so the literal meaning of 'inemuri' is "a sleep while staying."

'Inemuri' is one of the common practices in Japan, and you can see it easily.

It is thought that this comes from the fact that working hours have increased and sleeping hours have decreased in Japan.

In English, it is represented by the word "snooze" or "doze."
居眠り

私は今日、ほんの数分程「居眠り」をしてしまいました。

「居眠り」とは、何かをしているときに(特に学校や職場などで)眠ってしまうことを意味する言葉です。

「居」は "stay," 「眠り」は "sleep" を意味するので、「居眠り」の文字どおりの意味は "a sleep while staying" となります。

「居眠り」は日本においてよく観察される慣習の一つとなっています。

これは、労働時間の増加、および睡眠時間の減少の結果であると考えられています。

英語では "snooze" や "doze" という単語で表現されます。
No. 1 SallyG's correction
Good job, it looks great! Keep up the good work, and best of luck with your English! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and helpful comment!
I understand well. (^^)

Tori ni Tarinai (取るに足りない - Marginal)

Dec 10, 2018 23:32
Toru ni Tarinai

I sometimes do work that can be described as 'toru ni tarinai' (取るに足りない).

'Toruni tarinai' means to describe trivial things, that is not worth to mention its details.

'Toru' (取る) means "to take" or "to pick up," 'tari' (足り) means "enough" or "worth," and 'nai' (ない) is a negative suffix to the previous term 'tari'.

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'toru ni tarinai' is "It is not worth to pick up."

Incidentally, some people say 'taranai' (足らない) instead of 'tarinai'.
取るに足りない

私はたまに「取るに足りない」仕事をしています。

「取るに足りない」は、取り上げるだけの価値もない、些細なことを表す際に使う言葉です。

「取る」は "to take" や "to pick up"、「足り」は "enough" や "worth"、「ない」は直前の「足り」を否定する語です。

すなわち「取るに足りない」の文字どおりの意味は "It is not worth to pick up" というわけです。

ちなみに「足りない」は「足らない」と言われることもあります。
No. 1 Yukinekorin's correction
Interesting as usual! ^^
So...does 足らない have the same meaning as 足りない in this case?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
> So...does 足らない have the same meaning as 足りない in this case?
Yes, both 足りない and 足らない have the same meaning. 足らない is a little bit old-fashioned.

Taguimare (類まれ - Extraordinary)

Dec 9, 2018 22:07
Taguimare

Recently, I had an experience that can be described as 'taguimare' (類まれ).

'Taguimare' mean that something is very rare, or there is almost nothing that is equivalent to it.

'Tagui' (類) means "similar" or "same," and 'mare' (まれ) means "rare."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'taguimare' is "there are rarely similar things."

For example, you can say something like 'Kare wa taguimare na sainō wo motte iru' (彼は類まれな才能を持っている - He has an exceptional ability).
類まれ

私は最近「類まれ」な経験をしました。

「たぐいまれ」とは、何かが非常に少なく珍しいさまや、同等のものがほとんど存在しないさまを表す言葉です。

「類(たぐい)」は "similar"、「まれ」は "rare" を意味します。

すなわち「類まれ」の文字どおりの意味は、「類似したものがめったにない」ということになります。

例えば、「彼は類まれな才能を持っている」のように使います。

Debushō (出不精 - Houseplant)

Dec 8, 2018 18:44
Debushō

These days, I may have begun to have a property called 'debushō' (出不精).

'Debushō' means to stay for a long time in the house due to the laziness, or a person who has such character.

'De' (出) means "to go out," 'bu/fu' (不) is a negative term, and 'shō' (精) means "spirit."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'debushō' is a spirit that you do not want to go out.

There is a theory that says that the term 'debu' (デブ - "a fat person") comes from 'debushō', but the reliability is not clear.
出不精

私は最近、「出不精」の性質が現れてきたかもしれません。

「出不精」とは、外出するのを面倒くさがり、ずっと家にいることや、そのような性質を持つ人のことを指す言葉です。

「出」は "to go out"、「不」は否定語、そして「精」は "spirit" を意味します。

すなわち「出不精」とは、「外出をしたがらない精神」というわけです。

太っている人を指す差別用語「デブ」は、「出不精」から来たという説もありますが、定かではありません。
No. 1 Judy's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and the helpful explanation! :)

Machibouke wo Kuu (待ちぼうけを食う - Chilling Out)

Dec 7, 2018 23:39
Machibouke wo Kuu

Now I am doing 'machibouke wo kuu' (待ちぼうけを食う).

Since 'machi' (待ち) means "to wait" and 'bouke/houke' (ぼうけ/ほうけ) means "abstracted," the combination 'machibouke' (待ちぼうけ) means that a person who you are waiting for eventually does not come or you are sick of waiting for someone.

In addition, 'kuu' (食う) is a bit violent form of the verb 'taberu' (食べる - "to eat"), but it can also mean to be subjected to an undesirable action from someone.

That is to say, 'machibouke wo kuu' means that "to be subjected to an act of waiting for someone" or "to be stood up by someone."

be stood up
待ちぼうけ食う

私は今、待ちぼうけを食っています。

「待ち」は "wait"、「ぼうけ」は "abstracted" を意味し、「待ちぼうけ」は「待っている相手がついに来ないこと」や「待ち疲れてぼんやりすること」を意味します。

また、「食う」は "eat" を意味する動詞「食べる」を少し乱暴にした言葉ですが、「望ましくない行為を身に受ける」ことを意味することもできます。

すなわち「待ちぼうけを食う」とは、「待ちぼうけを身に受ける」ということを意味します。
No. 1 バネッサ's correction
What you originally wrote is pretty much perfect! Just changed it to sound a little more natural :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Ōzume (大詰め - The Final Stage)

Dec 6, 2018 06:44
Ōzume

My research is about to reach a stage called 'ōzume' (大詰め).

'Ōzume' means the final stage or phase of something.

'Ō' (大) means "big," and 'zume' (詰め) means "fill," "infill," or "checkmating" in Shōgi (将棋 - "Japanese chess").

Originally, this term meant the last stage/chapter in historical Kabuki Kyogen (歌舞伎狂言 - "traditional Japanese dramas performed by male actors").

Later, 'ōzume' has come to be used not only in Kabuki but also in common situations as a word to mean the final stage/phase of things.
大詰め

私の研究は今、「大詰め」と呼ばれる段階に来ています。

「大詰め」とは、物事の最終的な段階や局面を指す言葉です。

「大」は "big"、「詰め」は "fill" や "infill"、もしくは将棋などにおける "checkmating" を意味します。

もともとこの言葉は、江戸の歌舞伎において、時代物を演じる狂言(一番目狂言)の最終幕を指す言葉でした。

これが歌舞伎だけでなく、物事の最終的な段階を指す一般的な言葉として使われるようになったというわけです。
No. 1 toshokan's correction
Excellent English!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Sharakusai (しゃらくさい)

Dec 5, 2018 23:42
Sharakusai

Today, I used the Japanese phrase, 'sharakusai' (しゃらくさい), which is no longer used very much.

'Sharakusai' means that someone pushes oneself and is insolent.

There are several theories about the etymology of this; I will introduce two famous ones among them.

One theory says that 'sharakusai' was made by adding 'kusai' (くさい - "-like") to 'share' (洒落 - "chic").

The other theory says that it comes from the fact that unpopular men used a lot of incense called 'kyara' (伽羅).

In this theory, 'kusai' (くさい) literally means "stink" or "smell bad."
しゃらくさい

私は今日、最近ではあまり使われない「しゃらくさい」という言葉を口にしました。

「しゃらくさい」は、誰かが分をわきまえず生意気であることを意味する言葉です。

「しゃらくさい」の語源には諸説ありますが、以下では有名な2つの説を紹介します。

一つは、"chic" を意味する「洒落」に、「~のようだ」を意味する「くさい」をつけてできたという説です。

もう一つは、もてない男性が「伽羅」という高価なお香の匂いを漂わせて遊郭に通ったからという説です。

この説では、「くさい」は文字通り "stink" や "smell bad" を意味します。

Mochihada (餅肌 - Velvety Skin)

Dec 4, 2018 15:16
Mochihada

My skins have been rough lately.

Because of this, when I say a person who has 'mochihada' (餅肌), I feel faintly jealous.

'Mochi' (餅) means "rice cake" and 'hada' (肌) means "skin," so the literal meaning of 'mochihada' is "rice cake skins" or "skins like a rice cake."

Freshly pounded rice cakes have various properties -- fine-grained, smooth, elastic, white and beautiful.

In other words, 'mochihada' is a compliment that is used to a person who has such a beautiful skin.

Incidentally, in English, it can be expressed as "velvety skin," which is based on the texture of a velvet.
餅肌

私は最近、肌が荒れています。

そのため、私は「餅肌」の人がうらやましいです。

「餅」は "rice cake," 「肌」は "skin" を意味するので、「餅肌」の文字通りの意味は "rice cake skins" や "skins like a rice cake" になります。

つきたての餅は、きめ細かく、なめらかで、弾力があり、白く美しいです。

すなわち「餅肌」とは、そのような美しい肌を指した褒め言葉です。

英語では「ベルベット」の質感から、"velvety skin" と表現することがあります。
No. 1 airtu's correction
I have corrected a few sentences, but it was mainly just the skin error. Overall your writing is of a high level. c:
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Gikkuri Goshi (ぎっくり腰 - Acute Low Back Pain)

Dec 3, 2018 15:08
Gikkuri Goshi

Two days ago, I hurt my low back suddenly and could not stand for a while.

When you strain your low back suddenly, the symptom is commonly called 'gikkuri goshi' (ぎっくり腰) in Japanese.

'Gikkuri' (ぎっくり) is a term that describes that someone is surprised and upset, and 'goshi/koshi' (腰) means "low back."

Interestingly, it seems that this symptom is called "Hexenschuss" in Germany and "Colpo della strega" in Italy, both of which mean "witch's shot."

Incidentally, the official name is 'kyūsei youtsū shō' (急性腰痛症 - "acute low back"), but most Japanese people say 'gikkuri goshi'.
ぎっくり腰

私は先日腰を痛めて、暫くまともに立てませんでした。

突然腰部に激しい痛みが走ることを、日本語で俗に「ぎっくり腰」と言います。

「ぎっくり」は驚き動揺するさまを表す言葉で、「腰」は "low back" を意味します。

興味深いことに、ドイツやイタリアではぎっくり腰が魔女の仕業だと考えられており、「魔女の一撃」(独: Hexenschuss, 伊: Colpo della strega) と呼んでいるそうです。

ちなみに、正式名称は「急性腰痛症」ですが、「ぎっくり腰」のほうが圧倒的によく使われます。
No. 1 Nandes's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Nandes
I found that an exercise called "crunch" is very effective in preventing bad back. The following is a typical instruction:
Toru
Wow, thank you so much for letting me know that! I will try it. :)
No. 2 スイちゃん's correction
それは大変ですね(・・;)
早く治るといいですね。お大事に(><)
Toru
スイちゃん、コメントありがとう。
だいぶ良くなりました。 :)

Oyasumi (おやすみ - Good Night)

Dec 2, 2018 14:35
Oyasumi

The most common phrase used when you go to bed in Japan is 'oyasumi' (おやすみ).

If you want to be a little more polite, you can say 'oyasuminasai' (おやすみなさい) by adding 'nasai' (なさい).

'O' (お) is a polite prefix, 'yasumi' (やすみ) means "to rest," and 'nasai' is short for 'nasatte kudasai' (なさって下さい), which means "please do that."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'oyasuminasai' is "Please get rest."

You can use this phrase not only when you go to bed but also when you say goodbye to someone at night.
おやすみ

日本の就寝時の挨拶でもっとも一般的なのは「おやすみ」です。

丁寧に言いたいときは「なさい」をつけて「おやすみなさい」と言います。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「やすみ」は "rest," 「なさい」は "please do that" を意味する「なさって下さい」を省略した語です。

すなわち「おやすみなさい」は "Please get rest" という意味になります。

就寝時だけでなく、夜に人と別れる際にもよく使われます。
No. 1 ohlookitsme's correction
Nice entry! I enjoyed reading it and I learnt something new (^-^)
英語は上手ですね!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Yoku Ieba, Waruku Ieba (良く言えば~、悪く言えば~)

Dec 1, 2018 18:48
Yoku Ieba, Waruku Ieba,

I introduced you to the Japanese term 'ishiatama' (石頭 - hard head/inflexible) yesterday, and 'majime' (真面目 - serious/earnest) several days ago.

Both of these terms have a similar meaning, but 'majime' includes a positive connotation, whereas 'ishiatama' includes a negative connotation.

If you want to express a person who can be described by both of them, you can say as follows:

"Yoku ieba majime, waruku ieba ishiatama" (良く言えば真面目、悪く言えば石頭).

'Yoku' (良く) means "good/positive," 'waruku' (悪く) means "bad/negative," and 'ieba' (言えば) means "saying/speaking."

Therefore, the above expression means that he/she is 'majime' (earnest) in a good way of saying, but 'ishiatama' (inflexible) in a bad way of saying.
良く言えば~、悪く言えば~

昨日は「石頭」という言葉を、数日前は「真面目」という言葉を紹介しました。

これらは似た意味を持ちますが、「真面目」は良いニュアンスを含む一方で、「石頭」は悪いニュアンスを含みます。

誰かの性格を表す際に、これらのどちらも言葉を当てはまる場合は、次のように言うことができます。

「良く言えば真面目、悪く言えば石頭。」

「良く」は "good/positive," 「悪く」は "bad/negative," 「言えば」は "saying/speaking" を意味します。

すなわちこの表現は、"He/she is 'majime' (earnest) in a good way of saying, but 'ishiatama' (inflexible) in a bad way of saying." という意味になります。
No. 1 Greg's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
Greg
どういたしまして。

Ishiatama (石頭 - Hard Head)

Nov 30, 2018 17:50
Ishiatama

Several days ago, I introduced you to the Japanese term 'majime' (真面目 - serious/earnest).

In addition, on another day, I introduced 'kimajime' (生真面目 - too serious/earnest), which has a similar meaning to 'majime' and a bad nuance.

There is another term that is used in a similar way as 'kimajime'; it is 'ishiatama' (石頭).

'Ishi' (石) means "stone" and 'atama' (頭) means "head."

That is to say, 'isiatama' literally means that someone has a stiff head as if it is a stone and is inflexible.
石頭

先日、私は「真面目」という言葉を紹介しました。

また、同様の意味で悪いニュアンスを有する「生真面目」という言葉も紹介しました。

「生真面目」と同じような使われ方をする言葉として、「石頭」があります。

「石」は "stone," 「頭」は "head" を意味します。

すなわち「石頭」は文字どおり、石のように固く、融通の利かない頭を意味します。
No. 1 RaboDeAji's correction
Great writing.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Yakeishi ni Mizu (焼け石に水 - An Effort that's Bound to Fail)

Nov 29, 2018 19:38
Yakeishi ni Mizu

Slight efforts or supports could be not useful.

The Japanese proverb ‘Yakeishi ni mizu’ (焼け石に水) expresses that.

‘Yake’ (焼け) means “burnt,” ‘ishi’ (石) means “stone,” and ‘mizu’ (水) means “water,” so the literal meaning of ‘yakeishi ni mizu’ means “(put) water on a burnt stone.”

As you can guess, even if you put a small amount of water on a burnt stone, the water evaporates soon, and there is little change in the temperature of the stone.

Because of this, ‘yakeishi ni mizu’ has come to mean that a small amount of efforts or supports has almost no effects.
焼け石に水

努力や援助が少ないと、何の役にも立たないことがあります。

このようなことを表すことわざに「焼け石に水」があります。

「焼け」は “burnt”、石は “stone”、水は “water” を意味するので、このことわざの文字通りの意味は “water to a burnt stone” となります。

焼けて熱くなった石に、少量の水をかけたところで、水はすぐに蒸発してしまいます。

このことから、「焼け石に水」は少しの努力や援助では効果がないことを表すようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Greg's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Greg
You're welcome, thanks for the interesting articles!

Okame Hachimoku (岡目八目 - Bystander's Vantage)

Nov 28, 2018 22:24
Okame Hachimoku

Generally, it is considered that third parties can judge things more correctly than the parties involved.

The four-character idiom 'okame hachimoku' (岡目八目) can express such a fact.

'Okame' (岡目) was originally written as 傍目 (literally "side eye"), and it means to see/watch something from the outside.

In addition, 'hachi' (八) means "eight," and 'moku' (目) means the number of steps/moves in the game of 'go'.

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'okame hachimoku' is that people who watch the game of 'go' from the side can examine eight more moves compared to the two players.
岡目八目

一般的に、当事者よりも第三者のほうが、物事を正しく判断できると考えられます。

このようなことを表す四字熟語に、「岡目八目」があります。

「岡目」はもともと「傍目」と書き、「他人のすることを傍らから見ること」を意味します。

また、「八」は "eight," 「目」は囲碁における手数を意味します。

すなわち「岡目八目」の文字通りの意味は、囲碁において、傍から見ている人は対局者よりも、八目先まで見えるということです。
No. 1 Amanda's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Nerds' Birthday

Nov 27, 2018 14:58
Nerds' Birthday

A few days ago, I found an interesting theory on the Internet.

That is "Nerds tend to be born in the winter."

In Japan, school begins on April 1st.

Therefore, if someone is born in the winter such as February or March, there will be a difference of about 10 months (maximum almost 1 year) with those who are born in April or May despite being in the same grade.

Since the difference is huge for children, they could become to dislike sports and exercise, then become nerds.

Although this theory is not statistically supported, there is another interesting fact; "Japanese professional athletes tend to be born in April - June."
オタクの誕生日

先日、インターネット上で面白い説を見ました。

それは「オタクは冬生まれが多い」というものです。

日本では、4月1日、すなわち春から学校が始まります。

このため、2〜3月などの冬に生まれると、同学年の4〜5月生まれの人とは10ヶ月ほど(最大で約1年)の差が生じます。

幼少期にとってこの差は大きく、スポーツや運動が嫌いになり、オタクになるということです。

この説の裏付けはなされていませんが、興味深い事実として、日本のプロスポーツ選手は4〜6月生まれが多いそうです。
No. 1 Kevin's correction
Great job!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Kevin
You're always welcome!
No. 2 Greg's correction
Could be something to that!
Toru
Yes, I hope someone will investigate that. :)

Nisshin Geppo (日進月歩 - Fast Progressing)

Nov 26, 2018 17:09
Nisshin Geppo

Information technology, especially security technology, continually progresses day by day.

When describing such a fact, we use the four-character idiom 'nisshin geppo' (日進月歩).

'ni/nichi' (日) means "day," 'shin' (進) means "progress," 'ge/getsu' (月) means "month," and 'po/ho' (歩) means "walk" or "stride."

It is thought that this idiom was made by composing 'jitsugetsu' (日月 - "day and month") and 'shinpo' (進歩 - "progress").

That is to say, 日進月歩 means that something continue to progress day by day/month by month.
日進月歩

情報技術、特にセキュリティに関する技術は、日に日に絶えず進歩しています。

そのようなことを表す四字熟語に、「日進月歩」があります。

「日」は "day," 「進」は "progress," 「月」は "month," 「歩」は "walk/stride" を意味します。

この言葉は、"day and month" を意味する「日月」と、"progress" を意味する「進歩」を融合して作られた言葉だと考えられています。

すなわち「日進月歩」という熟語は、何かが日ごと月ごとに進歩し続けることを表しています。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
To me, it means to be so efficient, you complete a month's worth of work in a day.
Toru
Thank you for the comment. :)
I think that this term is used to mean that something changes/progresses just rapidly rather than efficiently.
No. 2 ColFrogfoot's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Kimajime (生真面目 - Too Serious/Earnest)

Nov 25, 2018 18:14
Kimajime

Yesterday, I introduced you to the term 'majime' (まじめ), which means "serious" or "earnest."

'Majime' is often used as a good sense, but some people think that to be too serious/earnest is not a good personality because such a person lacks flexibility.

If you want to describe a person who is too 'majime' (serious/earnest), you can use the term 'kimajime' (生真面目), which is made by adding 'ki' (生 - "pure/fresh") to 'majime'.

Of course, 'kimajime' can be used as a good sense (such as "very earnest"), but it includes negative nuances in most cases.
生真面目

昨日は "serious" や "earnest" を意味する日本語「まじめ」を紹介しました。

「まじめ」は良い意味で使われることが多いですが、まじめすぎると融通が利かなくなり、あまりよくないと考える人もいます。

このように、まじめすぎる人を表すには、「まじめ」に "pure/fresh" を意味する「生」をつけて、「生真面目」と言います。

もちろん、非常に真面目という良い意味で使われることもありますが、多くの場合はネガティブなニュアンスが含まれます。
No. 1 Greg's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Greg
どういたしまして。 。^‿^。

Majime (まじめ - Serious/Earnest)

Nov 24, 2018 22:09
Majime

I think I am what we call 'majime' (まじめ).

'Majime' means that someone is serious or earnest with respect to something.

'Maji' (まじ) in majime comes from the verb 'majirogu' (まじろぐ/瞬ぐ), which means to blink your eyes, and 'me' (め) means "eye."

Since it looks serious or earnest to stare at something while blinking your eyes, majime has come to have its current meaning.

Incidentally, the onomatopoeia 'majimaji' (まじまじ), which was made by repeating 'maji', can express that you stare at something.
まじめ

私はおそらく「まじめ」です。

「まじめ」とは何かに対して本気であることや、誠実であることを意味する言葉です。

「まじめ」の「まじ」は、目をまばたきさせることを意味する動詞「まじろぐ」から来ており、「め」は "eye" を意味します。

緊張して目をまばたかせながら何かを見つめるようすから、本気であることや誠実であることを表すようになったというわけです。

ちなみに、擬態語「まじまじ」は、何かをじっと見つめるさまを表します。
No. 1 ColFrogfoot's correction
Never heard 'onomatopoeia' before.

Its a real word though
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)

Pikaichi (ピカイチ - Best of the Bunch)

Nov 23, 2018 19:40
Pikaichi

When describing something/someone that is the best among many things/people, you can use the Japanese 'pikaichi' (ピカイチ).

This term comes from 'hana-awase' (花合わせ), which is one of the ways of playing traditional Japanese card 'hanafuda' (花札 - literally "flower cards").

There are mainly four types of cards in hanafuda: 1 point cards called 'kasu-fuda' (カス札 - literally "garbage card"), 5 point cards, 10 point cards, and 20 point cards called 'hikari-fuda' (光札 - literally "shining cards").

In the hana-awase, firstly seven cards are handed out to each participant.

At this time, when someone had six kasu-fudas and one hikari-fuda, it was called 'picaichi' (ピカイチ - literally "one pika/hikari"), and it has come to have its current meaning.
ピカイチ

多くのものの中で、飛び抜けて優れていることを日本語で「ピカイチ」と言うことがあります。

この言葉は、日本の伝統的なカード「花札」の遊び方の一つ「花合わせ」に由来します。

花札には、1点のカス札、5点の札、10点の札、20点の光札が存在します。

そして花合わせは、最初に7枚の札が各参加者に配られます。

このとき、「カス札が6枚、光札が1枚」の状態であることを「ピカイチ」と呼び、現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Eloise's correction
I didn't know about this! It's really interesting :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Usankusai (胡散臭い - Doubtful)

Nov 22, 2018 23:12
Usankusai

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term 'kinakusai' (きな臭い), which means that something is suspicious.

There is another term 'usankusai' (胡散臭い), which has a similar meaning to 'kinakusai'.

'Usan' (胡散) means that something is suspicious, and 'kusai' (臭い) is a prefix that has the meaning of "seem like" and a negative nuance.

As I mentioned yesterday, 'kinakusai' implies that something bad (such as a fire) is about to occur.

On the other hand, 'usankusai' is often used to mean that something seems like somewhat suspicious/doubtful.
胡散臭い

昨日は何かが疑わしいことを意味する「きな臭い」という言葉を紹介しました。

「きな臭い」とよく似た言葉に「胡散臭い」があります。

「胡散」は何かが怪しいことを意味する言葉で、「臭い」は「~らしい」の意味(特にマイナスのイメージ)を持つ接尾辞です。

「きな臭い」は昨日話したとおり、火事など何か悪い出来事が起こりそうなことを暗に意味します。

一方で「胡散臭い」は、何かが「何となく疑わしい」程度のことを意味する際によく使われます。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
うさんくさい! I have heard that one before. It's commonly used, right?

Toruさん、all your entries are very helpful and interesting. Thank you!!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, I think うさんくさい is commonly used.
I'm glad to hear you say that. (^^)

Kinakusai (きな臭い - Suspicious)

Nov 21, 2018 18:31
Kinakusai

When describing that something is suspicious, you can use the Japanese 'kinakusai' (きな臭い).

'kusai' (臭い) means "to smell/stink," but there are several theories about 'kina' (きな) -- they say that it comes from 'kinu' (きぬ - "clothes"), 'ki' (木 - "tree"), etc.

Originally, 'kinakusai' means a distinctive burnt smell that is generated when clothes or trees burn.

Since such a smell would be generated when bad incidents such as a fire or war would be about to occur, 'kinakusai' came to have the meaning of "suspicious."
きな臭い

何かが疑わしいことを表す日本語に「きな臭い」があります。

「臭い」は "to smell" を意味しますが、「きな」は "clothes" を意味する「衣」から来ている説と、"tree" を意味する「木(の)」から来ている説などがあります。

もともと「きな臭い」は、衣服や木が燃える際に発生する、特有の焦げた臭いを意味する言葉でした。

このような臭いが発生するのは、火事や事件、戦争など不穏な事態の前触れであることから、「きな臭い」は「疑わしい」や「怪しい」の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Greg's correction
We say, "I smell a rat" or "This smells fishy."
Toru
Thank you so much for letting me know the phrases!
I didn't know the former one. :)
No. 2 artboy598's correction
Is this as common as 怪しい?
Toru
No, I think that 怪しい is more common and versatile. :)

Suttoko Dokkoi (すっとこどっこい - Idiot)

Nov 20, 2018 20:15
Suttoko Dokkoi

Yesterday, I introduced you to the term 'tokoroga dokkoi' (ところがどっこい).

There is another term that uses dokkoi; it is 'suttoko dokkoi' (すっとこどっこい).

'Tokoroga dokkoi' is a conjunction that means "however," whereas 'suttoko dokkoi' is a noun that means "stupid" or "idiot."

There are several theories about its etymology, but the most accepted one is the following:

'Suttoko' (すっとこ) means "nude" or "ugly features/appearance," and 'dokkoi' (どっこい) comes from 'dokohe' (どこへ), which means "where."

That is to say, 'suttoko dokkoi' means that "Where are you going with nothing on (with such an ugly appearance)?", and later, it came to be an insulting term that means "idiot."
すっとこどっこい

昨日は「ところがどっこい」という言葉を紹介しました。

「どっこい」を使う言葉として、他に「すっとこどっこい」があります。

「ところがどっこい」は逆接の接続詞でしたが、「すっとこどっこい」は「バカ」や「間抜け」を意味する名詞です。

語源は諸説ありますが、次の説が有名です。

「すっとこ」は「裸体」や「醜い姿」を意味し、「どっこい」は「どこへ」から来ています。

すなわち「すっとこどっこい」は「裸のような醜い姿でどこへ行くんだ」を意味し、そこから「間抜け」のような意味を持つ罵り言葉になったというわけです。

Tokoroga Dokkoi (ところがどっこい - However)

Nov 19, 2018 10:39
Tokoroga Dokkoi

A few days ago, I used the term 'tokoroga dokkoi' (ところがどっこい) (though it is not often used).

'Tokoroga' (ところが) is a conjunction that is used to say something contrary to general expectations, and it can be translated in English as "however" or "although."

'Dokkoi' (どっこい) is a kind of exclamation that is used when putting your strength, and it is also said as 'dokkoisho' (どっこいしょ).

However, in this case, 'dokkoi' is just used to emphasize the previous term, 'tokoroga'.

That is to say, if you use 'tokoroga dokkoi', it implies that you will say something that listeners never expect/image.
ところがどっこい

あまり頻繁に使われる日本語ではありませんが、私は昨日「ところがどっこい」という言葉を使いました。

「ところが」は期待や予想に反することを述べる際に用いる接続詞で、英語では "however" や "although" に相当します。

「どっこい」は力を入れるときの掛け声で、「どっこいしょ」とも言います。

しかし、この場合「どっこい」は、単に「ところが」を強調する語として使われています。

すなわち「ところがどっこい」と話し手が行った場合、これから聞き手の期待・予想を大きく裏切ることを述べることを示唆します。
No. 1 Spot53's correction
I wonder if I will get a chance to use this expression. I am sure that even saying it would surprise some of the people that I talk to because is seems like such a colloquial expression.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Sorry for the reply late.
No. 2 Greg's correction
Sounds like it might be equivalent to, "But wait! Listen to this..." What do you think?
Toru
Thank you for the correction! And sorry for the late reply.

> "But wait! Listen to this..."
Indeed, I think this is similar to ところがどっこい!

Gohounen Kudasai (ご放念ください - Please Disregard Something)

Nov 17, 2018 04:14
Gohounen Kudasai

Several days ago, I used the phrase 'gohounen kudasai' (ご放念下さい) when writing an e-mail.

'Go' (ご) is a polite prefix, 'hou' (放) means "to let something go," 'nen' (念) means "mind" or "care," 'kudasai' (ください), so the literal meaning of this phrase is "Please let your mind/care go."

This phrase is used when you do not want someone to care about something or you want someone to forget something.

For example, when you find that you sent an e-mail to someone by mistake, you can use it on another e-mail to apologize for your mistake.
ご放念ください

私は先日、メールで「ご放念ください」という表現を使いました。

「ご」は丁寧の接頭辞、「放」は "to let something go"、「念」は "mind" や "care"、「ください」は "please" を意味します。

この表現は、何かを気にしないでもらいたいときや、何かを忘れてもらいたいときに使います。

例えば、誰かに間違いメールを送ったことに気づいた場合、間違えたことを謝罪するメールで使うことなど多いです。
No. 1 Emi's correction
Perfect
Toru
Thank you for your comment! (^^)
No. 2 Amop567's correction
Useful phrase! Thank you for the lesson.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Houkou Onchi / Undō Onchi (方向音痴 / 運動音痴)

Nov 16, 2018 20:56
Houkou Onchi / Undō Onchi

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term 'onchi' (音痴), which means "tone deaf."

There are several terms that were derived from this 'onchi' -- 'houkou onchi' (方向音痴), 'undō onchi' (運動音痴), etc.

'Houkou' (方向) means "direction," and 'undō' (運動) means "sport" or "exercise."

In addition, 'onchi' (音痴) can mean a poor ability/sense of not only singing but also a specific one.

That is to say, 'houkou onchi' means a person who has no sense of direction and is often get lost, and 'undō onchi' means a person who has poor sports ability.
方向音痴/運動音痴

昨日は、歌が下手なことを意味する「音痴」という言葉を紹介しました。

この「音痴」から派生した言葉として、「方向音痴」や「運動音痴」があります。

「方向」は "direction," 「運動」は "sport" や "exercise" を意味します。

「音痴」は、歌に限らず特定の能力や感覚が劣ることを表すことがあります。

すなわち「方向音痴」は「方向の感覚が鈍くてよく道に迷う人」を、「運動音痴」は「運動能力が他人よりも劣っている人」を意味するというわけです。

Onchi (音痴 - A Bad Signer)

Nov 15, 2018 14:32
Onchi

Recently, I learned that you can enjoy karaoke with Nintendo Switch.

Also, the other day, I bought a microphone and an unlimited pass, then enjoyed karaoke at my home.

Unfortunately, I noticed something.

Probably I am a person called 'onchi' (音痴).

'On/oto' (音) means "sound," and 'chi' (痴) means that someone does not have an ability to distinguish something or is a little dumb.

That is to say, 'onchi' means that someone does not have the ability to distinguish sounds, and it is often used to describe a person who is a bad singer.
音痴

最近、Switch でカラオケができることを知りました。

そして先日、マイクと利用券を購入し、自宅でカラオケを楽しみました。

そこで気が付いたことがあります。

私は「音痴」かもしれません。

「音」は "sound," 「痴」は何かを判別する能力がはたらかないことや、頭の働きが鈍いことを意味します。

すなわち「音痴」とは、音に対する感覚が鈍いことであり、主に歌が下手な人のことを表す際に用いられます。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
I might not be an 音痴 when it comes to music, but definitely am when it comes to directions haha
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Actually, I am bad with directions too, haha.
No. 2 Greg's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Taikoban wo Osu (太鼓判を押す - Guaranteeing)

Nov 14, 2018 21:10
Taikoban wo Osu

Yesterday, I introduced you to the term 'machigai-nai' (間違いない), which means that there is no doubt that something/someone is good.

Today, I would like to introduce another term having a similar meaning, 'taikoban wo osu' (太鼓判を押す).

'Taiko' (太鼓) means "Japanese-style drum," 'han/ban' (判) means "seal" (emblem), and 'osu' (押す) means "to put something" or "to stamp."

'Taikoban' can literally mean a big seal like a drum, but originally, it meant Japanese-style drum-like decorations that were stamped on an edge of golden coins.

Since these stamped coins mean that their values were guaranteed, 'taikoban wo osu' came to mean to guarantee that something/someone is good/valuable.
太鼓判を押す

昨日は、何かや誰かが良いもので間違いないことを意味することができる「間違いない」という言葉を紹介しました。

今日は、それとよく似た意味を持つ「太鼓判を押す」という慣用句を紹介します。

「太鼓」は "Japanese-style drum." 「判」は "seal" (emblem), 「押す」は "to put something" や "to stamp" を意味します。

「太鼓判」は文字通り太鼓のように大きな判子の意味も持ちますが、もともとは日本の金貨の縁につけた、太鼓の皮留めのような装飾を指しました。

太鼓判が押された金貨はその価値が保証されたことを意味するため、「太鼓判を押す」は「物や人が優れていることを保証する」ことを意味するようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
What an excellent evocative idiom!
Toru
Thank you for the comment! :)
No. 2 Andrew's correction
Hi Toru
your English is very good

Andrew

Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and comment! :)

Machigai-Nai (間違いない - Doubtless)

Nov 13, 2018 15:10
Machigainai

Today, I saw an advertisement saying that 'Machigai-nai *** desu' (間違いない○○です) in my university.

'Machigai' (間違い) means "mistake" or "error," and 'nai' (ない) means a negative suffix, so the literal meaning of 'machigai-nai' is "no mistake" or "no doubt."

Normally, the adjective 'machigai-nai' is used to mean that there is no mistake or no room for doubt in something mentioned before.

However, this adjective can also be placed just before a noun, such as 'machigai-nai shōhin' (間違いない商品 - literally "doubtless product") or 'machigai-nai aji' (間違いない味 - literally "doubtless taste").

In these cases, 'machigai-nai' contains the meaning of "assurance" -- in other words, it implies that you will never make a mistake if you choose this product/dish/etc.
間違いない

今日、「間違いない○○です」と書かれた広告を見かけました。

「間違い」は "mistake" や "error," 「ない」は否定語であるため、「間違いない」は "no mistake" や "no doubt" のような意味になります。

通常「間違いない」は、前述の内容に対して、誤りがないことや疑いの余地がないことを断定するために使います。

しかし、「間違いない商品」や「間違いない味」のように、「間違いない」を前置修飾の形容詞として使うこともできます。

このとき「間違いない」は、それを選べば失敗することはない、という保証の意味を含んでいます。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
You’re a machigainai teacher lol
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
Haha, I'm flattered. (*^^*)
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
That’s one way to advertise, I guess.
Toru
Yes, that phrase will give people a sense of ease.
No. 3 Amop567's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
> Would "sure thing" work instead?
Yes, I think it works. :)

Otasā no Hime (オタサーの姫 - "Princess in a Nerds' Club")

Nov 12, 2018 19:54
Otasā no Hime

Yesterday, I introduced you to the term 'kou itten' (紅一点), which means a woman among many men.

Today, I would like to introduce the slang term 'otasā no hime' (オタサーの姫), which has a similar meaning to it.

'Otasā' (オタサー) is short for 'otaku no sākuru' (オタクのサークル - literally "nerds' club"), and 'hime' (姫) means "princess."

This term is used when referring to one or a few female members belonging to a liberal-arts-oriented club that is composed mainly of men (especially nerds).

Since male members in such clubs often treat a few female members as "princess," they has come to be called 'otasā no hime.'
オタサーの姫

昨日は多くの男性の中にただ一人いる女性を表す「紅一点」という言葉を紹介しました。

今日は、それと似た意味を持つ俗語「オタサーの姫」を紹介します。

「オタサー」は大学等における「オタクのサークル」の略、姫は "princess" を意味します。

この言葉は、男性の割合が多い文化系のサークル、特にオタクが集まるサークルにいる、数少ない女性メンバのことを指します。

このようなサークルにいる数少ない女性メンバは希少であり、男性メンバから「姫」扱いされることから、「オタサーの姫」と呼ばれるようになりました。
No. 1 Greg's correction
サークル is a Japanese rendition of the English word "circle," right?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Yes, サークル comes from the English word "circle."
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
what if the girl isn't good looking?
Toru
In most cases in Japanese nerds' club, even if the girl isn't good looking, male members treat her as if she is a princess. Because of this, the term オタサーの姫 is sometimes used as an offensive word to imply that she isn't very good looking.
Kiwi
Thanks, I thought that might be the case. It’s a rather sad culture.

Kou Itten (紅一点 - The Only Woman in a Group)

Nov 11, 2018 22:01
Kou Itten

A group I know is composed of about twenty men and one woman.

When a woman belonging to a male group like this case, she is referred to as 'kou itten' (紅一点).

'Kou' (紅) means "red" or "crimson," 'i/ichi' (一) means "one," and 'ten' (点) means "point."

Originally, this term was used in China to mean "one crimson flower blooming in a field of grass."

In Japan, it came to mean "a different thing among many things," furthermore, these days it is usually used to mean "a woman among many men."
紅一点

私が知るあるグループは、男性20人と女性1人で構成されています。

このように、多くの男性の中にただ一人いる女性のことを、「紅一点」と言います。

「紅」は "red" や "crimson," 「一」は "one," 「点」は "point" を意味します。

もともとこの言葉は、中国で「一面の緑の中に咲く一輪の紅色の花」を意味するために使われていました。

これが日本では「多くのものの中で異彩を放つもの」の意味として用いられるようになり、「多くの男性の中にいる唯一の女性」の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
Can you say this if there is one man and twenty women?
Toru
No, I think that we don't have terms to explain the man.
When describing such a situation, we probably use a term ハーレム (harem).
Kiwi
Oh, I see, thanks.
No. 2 Greg's correction
I love reading your descriptions of Japanese idioms! Very educational, and your English is excellent.
Greg
  • When a woman belongs to a male group like this case, she is referred to as 'kou itten' (紅一点).
Even better might be: "When a woman is among a group of men like this, she is..."
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Miira-tori ga Miira ni Naru (ミイラ取りがミイラになる - Many Go out for Wool and Come Home Shorn)

Nov 10, 2018 21:33
Miira-tori ga Miira ni Naru

I sometimes fall into a situation described by the proverb 'miira-tori ga miira ni naru' (ミイラ取りがミイラになる).

'Miira' (ミイラ) means "mummy," 'tori' (取り) means "hunter" or "taker," and 'naru' (なる) means "to become," so the literal meaning of this proverb is "A mummy hunter becomes a mumy."

Here, 'miira-tori' (ミイラ取り - "mummy hunter") implies a person who tries to bring someone back or persuade someone, and 'miira ni naru' (ミイラになる - "becoming a mummy") implies that the person fails to fulfill his/her purpose.

If you want to express this proverb in English, you can say "Many go out for wool and come home shorn."
ミイラ取りがミイラになる

私はたまに「ミイラ取りがミイラになる」という諺に表される状況になります。

「ミイラ」は "mummy," 「取り」は ”hunter” や "taker," 「なる」は "to become" を意味するので、この諺の文字通りの意味は "A mummy hunter becomes a mummy" となります。

ここで、「ミイラ取り」は誰かを連れ戻しに行った人や説得しに行った人を示唆し、「ミイラになる」は目的を果たせず先方にとどまったり相手に説き伏せられてしまうことを示唆しています。

英語で同様の意味を持つ表現としては "Many go out for wool and come home shorn" があります。
No. 1 dec's correction
So "Indiana Jones" becomes "in the 穴 Jones" ...
Toru
It is ingenious, haha.
No. 2 artboy598's correction
Thanks for the lesson. I feel the same way often when debating with friends lol!
Toru
Haha, by the way, I think that it can also be described as 懐柔される.

聞く and 聴く (Listen/Hear)

Nov 9, 2018 19:55
聞く and 聴く

I often "listen" to popular music.

Besides, these days I often hear the sound of rain.

In English, you can use the verb "listen" when you pay attention to the sounds coming into your ears, whereas you can use the verb "hear" when you are aware of sounds coming through your ears.

On the other hand, Japanese people say 'kiku' (きく) in both cases -- we do not distinguish between those pronunciations.

However, 'kiku' can be written as kanji in two different ways; 聞く and 聴く;

聞く can be used to mean both "listen" and "hear," whereas 聴く can be used to mean only "listen."
「聞く」と「聴く」

私はよく音楽を「聴き」ます。

そして、最近は雨の音がよく「聞こえて」きます。

英語では、集中して何かを聞くときには "listen," 何かが自然に聞こえてくるときには "hear" を使います。

一方で日本語では、どちらの場合も「きく」と言い、口語では区別をつけていません。

ただし、「きく」の漢字は大きく「聞く」と「聴く」の二通りがあります。

「聞く」はどのような場合にも使え、「聴く」は集中して何かを聞くという意味でのみ使うことができます。
No. 1 dec's correction
Very good.
Toru
Thank you very much for the correction and helpful explanations! :)

Shippo wo Dasu (尻尾を出す - Revealing One's Secret Unintentionally)

Nov 8, 2018 17:16
Shippo wo Dasu

Yesterday, I introduced you to the idion 'boro ga deru' (ぼろが出る), which means to reveal one's secret faults/weaknesses unintentionally.

There is another idiom, 'shippo wo dasu' (尻尾を出す), which has the similar meaning of this.

'Shippo' (尻尾) means "tail" and 'dasu' (出す) means "to come out" or "to reveal," so the literal meaning of 'shippo wo dasu' is "to reveal one's tail."

Here, the tail represents the tail of a raccoon dog or fox -- Japanese people have believed that raccoon dogs and foxes deceive people by changing their figure.

Even if they change their figure into something else, you can detect the truth by seeing their tail, so 'shippo wo dasu' has come to mean that someone reveals his/her secret unintentionally.
尻尾を出す

昨日は、欠点が不意に出てしまうことを意味する「ぼろが出る」という慣用句を紹介しました。

これと似た慣用句に、「尻尾を出す」があります。

「尻尾」は "tail," 「出す」は "to come out" や "to reveal" を意味するので、「尻尾を出す」の文字通りの意味は "to reveal one's tail" となります。

ここでの「尻尾」は、化けて人を騙すと信じられている狸や狐の尻尾を表しています。

狸や狐が何かに化けていても、尻尾を出してしまうとその正体がばれてしまうことから、「尻尾を出す」は「隠していたことが不意に露見する」という意味を持つようになりました。
No. 1 Sam's correction
Interesting, I love to learn Japanese idioms. There are tons in English that make almost no sense haha.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! I also love to learn interesting English idioms. :)

Boro ga Deru (ぼろが出る - Letting One's Fault Reveal Unexpectedly)

Nov 7, 2018 22:30
Boro ga Deru

Have you ever let your secret faults reveal unexpectedly?

Such a situation can be described as 'boro ga deru' (ぼろが出る) in Japanese.

'Boro' (ぼろ) means shabby clothes, and it comes from an onomatopoeia 'boro boro' (ぼろぼろ), which describes that something is damaged.

Since people do not want to show their shabby clothes, 'boro' can also mean "fault" or "mistake."

In addition, 'deru' (出る) means "to come out."

That is to say, 'boro ga deru' means that "a fault comes out."
ぼろが出る

人に見られないよう隠してきた欠点が、不意に出てしまったことはありますか?

そのようなことを、日本語で「ぼろが出る」と言います。

「ぼろ」は使い古した布や衣服のことで、何かがひどく傷んでいることを表す擬態語「ぼろぼろ」から来ています。

使い古した布は見られたくないものであることから、「ぼろ」は「欠点」や「失敗」を意味することもできます。

また、「出る」は "come out" を意味します。

すなわち「ぼろが出る」とは、"a fault comes out" ということです。
No. 1 Eeiko's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)
No. 2 tony's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
tony
いいえ、どういたしまして。

Speeding

Nov 6, 2018 15:13
Speeding

Yesterday, a man who was driving a GT-R in Osaka was arrested for speeding.

Surprisingly, the speed of his car was about 280 km/h.

Since the speed limit at the road was 60 km/h, he exceeded the speed limit by about 220 km/h.

This is the highest speed among those who arrested for speeding in Japan, and the amount of speed that exceeded the speed limit may be the world record.

Incidentally, the world record of the speeding offense is owned by Kazuhiko Nagata (known as "Smoky Nagata") -- he drove a GT-R at a British expressway at a speed of 317 km/h.
スピード違反

昨日、大阪で GT-R を運転していた男性がスピード違反で逮捕されました。

驚くことに、速度が時速約 280 km/h 出ていたそうです。

制限速度は 60 km/h なので、約 220 km/h の速度超過ということになります。

日本におけるスピード違反の検挙としては過去最高速度であり、速度超過量に関して言えば世界記録かもしれません。

ちなみに、スピード違反の世界記録は永田和彦(通称「スモーキー永田」)が持っており、イギリスの高速道路で 317 km/h を出したそうです。
No. 1 toc's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
If he absolutely knew he wasn't endangering anyone, I might say that he's a hero.
Toru
Yes, this is not something that anyone can do.

Pochi (ポチ)

Nov 5, 2018 17:34
Pochi

Dogs are the animal with the oldest history as pets, and many dogs are bred all over the world including Japan.

The most common name for dogs in Japan is 'pochi' (ポチ).

There are a variety of etymology about the name -- they say that it comes from the French "petit" (meaning "small"), the English "spotty," "Pooch," the Czech "Pojd'" (meaning "come"), or the Japanese 'koreppocchi' (これっぽっち - meaning "something small").

The most common synonym of dogs in Japan is 'wan-chan' (ワンちゃん), which was made by combining the dog's bark 'wan' (ワン) and the suffix 'chan' (ちゃん), but pochi is also common as a synonym of dogs.

ポチ

犬は、ペットとしての歴史が最も古い動物であり、日本でも多くの犬が飼育されています。

その犬に付ける名前として、日本で最も一般的なものは「ポチ」です。

語源はさまざまあり、フランス語で「小さい」を意味する "petit" (プチ) や、英語で「ぶち犬」を意味する "spotty" (スポッティ) や "Pooch" (プーチ), チェコ語で「来い」を意味する "Pojd'" (ポチュ), 日本語で「小さなもの」を意味する「これっぽっち」から来ている説などがあります。

犬の代名詞として最も一般的な日本語は、犬の鳴き声である「ワン」に「ちゃん」をつけた「ワンちゃん」ですが、「ポチ」もまた犬の代名詞として一般的です。
No. 1 z0えy's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 Oceansea's correction
Toru
Thank you very much for correcting my post! :)

Yoru Gohan (夜ごはん - Dinner)

Nov 4, 2018 11:43
Yoru Gohan

"Breakfast" is referred to as 'asa gohan' (朝ごはん - literally "morning meal") in Japanese.

"Lunch" is referred to as 'hiru gohan' (昼ごはん - literally "noon meal") in Japanese.

"Dinner" is referred to as 'ban gohan' (晩ごはん - literally "evening meal") or 'yū gohan' (夕ごはん - literally "evening meal").

However, recently people who call "dinner" 'yoru gohan' (夜ごはん - literally "night meal") have increased.

It is thought that this term comes from the fact that the antonym of 'asa' (朝 - morning) is 'yoru' (夜 - night).

Originally, 'yoru gohan' is not correct Japanese, but it is becoming common.
夜ごはん

"Breakfast" のことを日本語で「朝ごはん」と言います。

"Lunch" のことを日本語で「昼ごはん」と言います。

"Dinner" のことを日本語で「晩ご飯」や「夕ご飯」と言います。

しかし、近年では "dinner" を「夜ごはん」と言う人も増えています。

これは「朝」の対義語が「夜」であることに由来するものと考えられます。

「夜ごはん」は本来正しい日本語ではありませんが、市民権を得つつあります。
No. 1 Eeiko's correction
Ah, Japanese is evolving! >.<
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, languages are changing all the time. :)

Sazukari Kon (授かり婚 - Shotgun Wedding)

Nov 3, 2018 23:32
Sazukari Kon

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term 'dekichatta kekkon' (できちゃった結婚), which means "shotgun wedding."

However, since the expression '...chatta' (~ちゃった) contains a nuance of "unexpected" or "unintended," 'dekichatta kekkon' does not have a good image.

Because of this, these days people have come to use 'sazukari kon' (授かり婚) instead.

'Sazukari' (授かり) means "be given/gifted," and 'kon' (婚) is an abbreviation for 'kekkon' (結婚 - "marriage").

That is to say, 'sazukari kon' implies that the marriage is led by a given baby.
授かり婚

昨日は「できちゃった結婚」という言葉を紹介しました。

しかし、「~しちゃった」という表現は「予期しない」というニュアンスを含むことから、「できちゃった結婚」はあまり良いイメージを持っていません。

このため、近年ではこの言葉を「授かり婚」に言い換える動きがあります。

「授かり」は "be given/gifted," 「婚」は "mariage" を意味する「結婚」を略したものです。

すなわち、赤ん坊が授けられて、それをきっかけとした結婚というわけです。
No. 1 Eeiko's correction
I like that expression. Thank you for the lesson!
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post! :)

Dekichatta Kekkon (できちゃった結婚 - Shotgun Wedding)

Nov 2, 2018 23:30
Dekichatta Kekkon

Today, I would like to introduce you to the Japanese slang term 'dekichatta kekkon' (できちゃった結婚).

'Dekichatta' (できちゃった) is a slang term of 'dekita' (できた), meaning "something was made/created," and 'kekkon' (結婚) means "marriage."

This term does not describe clearly what was made, but here it means "baby."

That is to say, 'dekichatta kekkon' means a marriage due to an unintended pregnancy.

This term is often abbreviated as 'dekichatta kon' (できちゃった婚) or 'dekikon' (でき婚) for short.
できちゃった結婚

今日は日本の俗語「できちゃった結婚」を紹介します。

「できちゃった」とは "something is made/create" を意味する「できる」の過去形「できた」の俗語的表現であり、「結婚」は "marriage" を意味します。

何ができたのかは明記されていませんが、ここでは「赤ん坊」を示唆しています。

すなわち「できちゃった結婚」とは、予期せぬ妊娠をきっかけに結婚することを意味する言葉です。

よく「できちゃった婚」や「でき婚」のように略されます。
No. 1 Eeiko's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 Nom's correction
「Shotgun wedding」の文字通りの意味は全然違います。面白いですね。
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
No. 3 z0えy's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Me ga Nai (目がない - Having a Weakness)

Nov 1, 2018 17:40
Me ga Nai

When you want to describe that someone is fond of something heavily and crazily, you can use the Japanese idiom 'me ga nai' (目がない).

'Me' (目) means "eye" and 'nai' (ない) means "do not have" or "nothing," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "one does not have eyes."

If you do not have your eyes, the ability to see and judge things will down.

That is to say, 'me ga nai' implies that someone is too fond of something to see/judge anything.

Note that when this is used as 'miru me ga nai' (見る目がない) by adding 'miru' (見る - literally "seeing"), it literally means that someone has no eyes to judge/is blind to things.
目がない

何かに夢中になって、思慮分別を無くすほど好きであることを、「目がない」と言うことがあります。

「目」は "eye," 「ない」は "do not have" や "nothing" を意味するので、「目がない」の文字通りの意味は "one does not have eyes" となります。

目がないと何も見えないので、物事を判断する力が落ちてしまいます。

すなわち「目がない」とは、何も見えなくなるくらい何かに心を奪われてくれるということです。

ただし、「見る目がない」のように使う場合は、文字通り「物事を判断する力がない」という意味になります。
No. 1 Oceansea's correction
How interesting!
May I try to use it? How is this:
あそこの生徒はアニメに目がないです。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

> あそこの生徒はアニメに目がないです。
Wow, this sentence is perfect! Awesome. :)
Oceansea
Yay! I'm learning! XD
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
That's so interesting! In other words, it means to like something without thinking about or noticing any flaws? So it could be used for 物事 as well as 人, such as a new girlfriend, right?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
> So it could be used for 物事 as well as 人, such as a new girlfriend, right?
Yes, this idiom could be used for things and people.
However, if you want to say that someone is crazy fond of someone, I think it will be more natural to use (人に)夢中になる or (人に)骨抜きにされる。
No. 3 artboy598's correction
Thanks! Can you show me an example of how to use it?
Toru
Thank you for the comment!
This is often used like (人)は(物事)に目がない。
For example:
僕は甘いものに目がない。(I am fond of sweet food.)
彼は熱帯魚に目がない。(He is fond of tropical fish.)

Namida wo Nomu (涙を呑む - Swallowing Tears)

Oct 31, 2018 22:40
Namida wo Nomu

A few days ago, I took an action called 'namida wo nomu' (涙を呑む) in Japanese.

'Namida wo nomu' is an idiom that means to hold back one's tears when the one is about to cry due to regret, chagrin, or sorrow.

'Namida' (涙) means "tear," and 'nomu' (呑む) means "to drink" or "to swallow," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "to drink/swallow tears."

That is to say, this idiom implies that you hold back your tears by swallowing them.

I heard that the literal translation, "to swallow tears" and "to swallow/back down tears" can be used in the same meaning to this.
涙を呑む

私は先日、涙を呑みました。

「涙を呑む」とは、悔しさや無念さ、悲しさで泣きたいほどの気持ちのときに、涙を流さずにじっと我慢することを意味する慣用句です。

「涙」は "tear," 「呑む」は "to drink" や "to swallow" を意味するので、「涙を呑む」の文字通りの意味は "to swallow tears" となります。

出そうになった涙を体の内側に呑み込むことで、涙を堪えているというわけです。

英語でも同様に、"to swallow tears" や "to swallow back/down tears" のように言うようです。
No. 1 Eeiko's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
> A few days ago I, "namida wo nomu" ed.
I learned something new!
No. 2 Andrew's correction
Well done! I wish my Japanese was as good as your English.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Honenuki (骨抜き - Pulling Teeth)

Oct 30, 2018 17:19
Honenuki

I have seen a person who has gone into a state called 'honenuki' (骨抜き).

'Hone' (骨) means "bone," 'nuki' (抜き) means "to pull out," and the combination has three major meanings.

One is to pull out/remove fish or chicken bones (or a tool for doing it) as this term itself means.

In addition, since bones are very important for almost all living beings, it means to remove an important/key part from a plan or something.

Furthermore, if you use this term to a person, it means that he/she loses their belief or backbone due to sexual factors and is madly in love with someone.
骨抜き

私は「骨抜き」になった人を見たことがあります。

「骨」は "bone," 「抜き」は "to pick up" を意味し、「骨抜き」という言葉には大きく三つの意味があります。

一つは文字通り、調理などで魚や鶏の骨を取り除くことや、そのための道具です。

また、骨はあらゆる生物にとって重要であることから、計画などの肝心な部分を抜き取るという意味にもなります。

さらに、この言葉を人に対して使った場合、異性の魅力により信念や気骨が失われ、相手の言いなりになることを意味します。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
I see! Sounds like a useful phrase.
In English, "pulling teeth" usually describes a painstaking process.
For example,
"Getting him to answer the questions was like pulling teeth"
Toru
Thank you so much for letting me know the information!
I had a misunderstanding about that.
No. 2 Kento's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Butsubutsu Gawa (ぶつぶつ川)

Oct 29, 2018 16:18
Butsubutsu Gawa

Japan has a law called 'Kasen-hou' (河川法 - literally "River Raw"), which designates important rivers in our lives.

In other words, the designated rivers are official rivers in Japan.

According to this law, there are 35,383 official rivers in Japan.

Also, the shortest river among them is Butsubutsu Gawa (ぶつぶつ川 - literally "Butsubutsu River") in Wakayama, and its total length is 13.5 m.

I heard that 'butsubutsu' (ぶつぶつ) comes from the onomatopoeia 'futsufutsu' (沸々), which means that something gushes.

Incidentally, the longest river in Japan is Shinano Gawa (信濃川 - literally "Shinano River"), and its length is 357 km.
ぶつぶつ川

日本には河川法と呼ばれる法律があり、河川のうち公共の利害に重要なものを指定しています。

指定された河川は、日本における公式の河川であるというわけです。

この法律によると、日本には35383本の河川が流れています。

そしてこの河川の中で最も短い川は、和歌山県にある「ぶつぶつ川」であり、その全長は13.5 mです。

「ぶつぶつ」は、何かが湧き出ることを表す擬音「沸々」から来ているそうです。

ちなみに、日本で最も長い河川は「信濃川(千曲川)」で、全長は367 kmです。
No. 1 Oceansea's correction
Good writing!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
WOW, I didn't know that. Incidentally, the longest river in America is the Mississippi River and its length is 3,730 km.
Toru
Thank you for letting me know that. :)
The Mississippi River is longer than the length of Japan, haha.
Kiwi
wahahahaha!
No. 3 Kiwi's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

Mimi ni Tako ga Dekiru (耳にたこができる - Having a Sore Ear)

Oct 28, 2018 23:58
Mimi ni Tako ga Dekiru

Have you ever been disgusted by a person who talks the same story repeatedly?

You can describe such a situation by using the Japanese idiom, 'mimi ni tako ga dekiru' (耳にたこができる).

'Mimi' (耳) means "ear," 'tako' (たこ) means "callus," and 'dekiru' (できる) means "to be generated," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "a callus is generated on one's ear."

A callus is a hardened part on one's skin by pressure or friction, and it is usually generated on fingers, feet, etc.

That is to say, 'mimi ni tako ga dekiru' implies that one's ear is under strain as much as a callus is generated on one's ear.
耳にたこができる

同じ話を何度も聞かされて、うんざりしたことはありますか?

そのようなことを、「耳にたこができる」とい慣用句で表すことがあります。

「耳」は "ear," 「たこ」は "callus," 「できる」は "generate" を意味します。

「たこ」とは、圧力や摩擦によって固くなった皮膚のことで、通常は手や足の裏などにできます。

すなわち「耳にたこができる」とは、耳にたこができる程、耳に負担がかかっているということを暗に意味しています。
No. 1 Eeiko's correction
Thank you for the lesson!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Narau yori Nareyo (習うより慣れよ - Practice Makes Perfect)

Oct 27, 2018 20:31
Narau yori Narero

In my university, education based on practice has been performed.

It is also important to learn from people and books, but if you want to acquire practical skills efficiently, you should gain practical experience.

There is a proverb that says this fact, 'narau yori nareyo' (習うより慣れよ).

'Narau' (習う) means "to learn" or "to study," 'nareru' (慣れる) means "to get used to something," so the literal meaning of this proverb is "It is better to get used to it than learn it."

The similar fact can be described in English as "Practice makes perfect."
習うより慣れよ

私の大学では、実践に基づいた教育が行われています。

人や本から学ぶことも大事ですが、それよりも実践的な経験を重ねたほうが、よりよく技能を身につけることができます。

このことを表すことわざに、「習うより慣れろ」があります。

「習う」は "to learn" や "to study" を、「慣れる」は "to get used to" を意味するので、「習うより慣れよ」は "It is better to get used to it than learn it." という意味になります。

英語では "Practice makes perfect" のように表現されます。
No. 1 Nom's correction
実践的な教育は、より多くの時間も費用を掛かるから、実現する大学はほどんどないと思います。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
確かに、実践的な教育は多くの時間と労力を使います。日本の工学系の大学 (engineering course)では、週に数時間程度だけ「演習 (Practice)」という名前で実践的な技術を学ぶケースが多いと思います。
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Uni (ウニ - Sea Urchin)

Oct 26, 2018 23:44
Uni

Yesterday, I wrote about the fish 'harisenbon' (ハリセンボン - porcupinefish/blowfish).

Today, I would like to talk about 'uni' (ウニ), which has many spines as well as porcupinefish.

'Uni' is known as "sea urchin" in English, and it can be written as 海胆 or 海栗 in kanji.

海 means "sea," 胆 means "organ," and 栗 means "chestnut."

This is because the shucked sea urchin looks like "organ" and the outer shape of sea urchin looks like "chestnut."

Incidentally, according to the survey of an aquarium, the number of spines of a purple sea urchin was 2850.
ウニ

昨日は「ハリセンボン」という生き物について書きました。

今日は、ハリセンボンと同じように多くの棘を持つ「ウニ」を紹介します。

「ウニ」は漢字で「海胆」や「海栗」と書きます。

「海」は "sea," 「胆」 "organ," 栗は "chestnut" を意味します。

ウニの実が「胆」に見えることや、ウニの外形が「栗」のように見えることに由来します。

ちなみに、ある水族館でムラサキウニの棘の数を数えたところ、2850本あったそうです。
No. 1 Oceansea's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and explanation!
I understand well. :)

Harisenbon (ハリセンボン - Porcupinefish)

Oct 25, 2018 14:30
Harisenbon

"Porcupinefish" is referred to as 'harisenbon' (ハリセンボン) in Japanese.

I think that it is easy for most Japanese people to imagine the figure of this fish,

Because 'hari' (ハリ) means "spine" or "needle," 'senbon' (センボン) means "one thousand" or "many," and 'harisenbon' have a lot of spines/needles on their bodies.

Some Japanese people might think that they have around one thousand spines, but the actual number of spines is around 350.

Incidentally, the English name "porcupinefish" is derived from "porcupine," which also have a lot of needles on their bodies.

In addition, "porcupine" comes from the old French "porc-épic," the literal meaning of which is "spiny pig."
ハリセンボン

日本語で「ハリセンボン」と呼ばれる魚がいます。

多くの日本人にとって、この言葉からどんな魚であるかを想像するのは簡単だと思います。

なぜなら、「ハリ」は "spine" や "needle," 「センボン」は "one thousand" や "many" を意味し、「ハリセンボン」は体に多くの棘を有しているからです。

体に約1000本の棘があると勘違いする日本人もいるかもしれませんが、実際の棘の数は約350本前後だそうです。

ちなみに、英名の "porcupinefish" は、多くの棘を持つヤマアラシ ("porcupine") に由来します。

さらに "porcupine" は、「棘だらけの豚」を意味する古フランス語 "porc-épic" から来ているそうです。
No. 1 Kat's correction
We call them blowfish where I'm from, because they blow themselves up (inflate, not explode).
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and for letting me know that!
I learned something new. :)

Yaboyou (野暮用 - Trivial Errand)

Oct 24, 2018 17:12
Yaboyou

Today I had some 'yaboyou' (野暮用).

'Yaboyou' means a minor business to do or a trivial errand that you do not need to say.

In most cases, people use this word in the latter meaning.

'Yabo' (野暮) means that someone is rude or something is tasteless, and 'you' (用) means "errand."

That is to say, 'yaboyou' is a word that means a minor errand on business or a personal errand that is tasteless.

Incidentally, this word is often used when you do not want to talk about what you did/do in detail.
野暮用

私は今日、「野暮用」がありました。

「野暮用」とは、仕事のための用事や、言うまでもない取るに足らない用事のことを指す言葉です。

多くの場合、後者の意味で用いられます。

「野暮」は世情に疎いことや無粋なことを意味する語で、「用」は「用事」を意味します。

すなわち「野暮用」とは、遊びや趣味ではない仕事上の用事や、無粋でつまらない用事というわけです。

この言葉は、何をしていたか/これから何をするかを、あまり答えたくないときに使われることも多いです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Awesome, learning something new everyday with these entries.
Corrected on my smartphone so sorry if it's hard to read
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
> I'm not sure what you mean by "personal errand that is tasteless"
For example, it is to buy a toothpaste, to clean a pet's toilet, etc.
Amop567
I see. In that case it's better to say "trivial" instead.

"Tasteless" has a negative connotation and is usually used for things that are inappropriate.
For example:
"Everyone got angry at Bob after he told a vulgar and tasteless joke at the wedding ceremony."

Real 'Tanuki Neiri'

Oct 23, 2018 15:33
Real 'Tanuki Neiri'

Previously, I introduced you to the term 'tanuki neiri' (狸寝入り - literally "raccoon dog sleep"), which means "to pretend to fall asleep."

This word comes from the fact that raccoon dogs faint for a while when they are surprised, then they run away -- this behavior looks as if they pretended to fall asleep.

You might think that raccoon dogs don't do actual 'tanuki neiri' because they really faint.

However, according to the recent study, it has been revealed that raccoon dogs' brains are awake while they are fainting.

That is to say, raccoon dogs do the real 'tanuki neiri' instinctively.
本当の狸寝入り

以前私は、「寝たふりをすること」を意味する「狸寝入り」という言葉を紹介しました。

この言葉は、狸が驚いて一時的に気を失い、暫くすると起き上がって逃げていく様子が「寝たふり」に見える事実に由来します。

狸は実際に気を失っているのだから本当の「狸寝入り(寝たふり)」をしているわけではない、と思うかもしれません。

しかし最近の研究で、気を失っている間の狸の脳は目覚めているということが明らかにされました。

すなわち狸は、本能的に本当の「狸寝入り」をしているのです。
No. 1 mar's correction
In America we have an animal called an "opossum" which lies motionless pretending to be dead when threatened. This behavior is called "playing possum". BTW opossums are the only marsupial native to the New World.
Toru
Thank you very much for letting me know the interesting information!
I learned something new! (^^)

Kindai University (近畿大学)

Oct 22, 2018 13:52
Kindai University

There is a famous private university called 'Kinki Daigaku' (近畿大学 - literally "Kinki University") in Osaka, Japan.

'Kinki' (近畿) means the Kansai region (the area of western Japan), but its pronunciation sounds like "kinky," so the name "Kinki University" became a diplomatic problem.

Therefore, it had started considering to change the name to another one around 10 years ago, and it has changed to "Kindai University" since 2016.

'Kin' (近) and 'dai' (大) are short for 'Kinki' (近畿) and 'daigaku' (大学), respectively -- in fact, this university is known familiarly as 'Kindai' (近大).

Since both 'dai' and "university" means "university," the literal meaning of Kindai University is "Kinki University University," but it can't be helped.
近畿大学

日本には、大阪府に「近畿大学」という名前の私立大学があります。

「近畿」は関西地方を表す言葉ですが、"Kinki" という音が「性的に異常な/変態な」を意味する "kinky" と似た発音であるため、国際化において対外的な問題となりました。

そして10年前に名称の変更が検討され、2016年に「近畿大学」の英語名称が "Kindai University" となりました。

"Kindai" の "kin" と "dai" はそれぞれ「近畿」と「大学」の略で、実際に近畿大学は「近大」の略称で親しまれています。

"Dai" も "University" も「大学」を意味するので意味が重なってしまいますが、仕方のないことかもしれません。
No. 1 lemurs's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
I heard that one of the primary purposes is to expand the acceptance of foreign students, so I think your opinion is right.
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
What's wrong with being kinky? lol
Toru
Haha, I heard that when professors/students say the university name at an international conference, participants/audiences are surprised and laugh.

Okkū (億劫 - Bothersome)

Oct 21, 2018 22:45
Okkū

If you want to describe a feeling that you are not willing to do something because of bothersome, you can use the Japanese term 'okkū' (億劫).

Originally, 'okkū' was a Buddhist term, which represented a length of time that was too long to measure.

'Oku' (億) means "a hundred million," and 'kū/kou' (劫) means a time taken to completely disperse a rocky mountain with a side length of about 2000 kilometers by stroking it with a cloth once in 100 years.

Since such an act to take a lot of time is troublesome and bothersome, 'okkū' has come to have the meaning of "bothersome."
億劫

何かをするのが面倒で気が進まないことを、日本語で「億劫」と言うことがあります。

「億劫」はもともと仏教用語で、計算できないほどの大変な長さの時間を表すものでした。

「億」は一億 ("a hundred million")、「劫」は1辺約2000kmの岩山を100年に一度布で撫で、岩山が擦り減って無くなるのにかかる程の時間を意味します。

このようにとてつもなく時間のかかるものは面倒であることから、「億劫」は「面倒」の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 HaveringChinese's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 outdoors's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

> I'm wondering what "disperse a rocky mountain by stroking it with a cloth" means...
I wanted to mean something like:
a rocky mountain completely disappears by the friction of a cloth.

Tama ni Kizu (玉に瑕 - Even the Sun Has Spots)

Oct 20, 2018 15:32
Tama ni Kizu

Is there a perfect person or thing around you?

I think that most people and things have shortcomings, even if they look perfect.

If you want to describe a person or thing that looks perfect but has a slight shortcoming like this, you can use the proverb 'tama ni kizu' (玉に瑕).

'Tama' (玉) means "jewelry" and 'kizu' (瑕) means "scratch" or "fault."

This proverb was born in China, and originally it literally meant "a slight scratch/scar on a beautiful jewelry," but these days it often used to mean "a person who looks perfect but has a small fault."
玉に瑕

あなたの周りには、完璧な人や、完全なものがありますか?

ほとんどの人やものは、たとえ完璧や完全に見えたとしても、何らかの欠点があると思います。

このように、完全に見えるものに僅かな欠点があることを表すことわざに「玉に瑕」があります。

「玉」は「宝石」を、「瑕」は「ものにできたきず」や「欠点」を表します。

このことわざは中国で生まれ、もともとは文字通り「美しい宝石についた小さなきず」を表していましたが、現在では「完全のように見えるが小さな欠点のある人」の意味で使われることが多いです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Thanks for the lesson. Good writing too.
Amop567
Btw could you tell me the difference between the kanji 傷 and 瑕?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

> Btw could you tell me the difference between the kanji 傷 and 瑕?
Actually, 傷 is more common as kanji for 'kizu' (きず) than 瑕 in most cases. 瑕 can mean scratches on a thing, whereas 傷 can mean both scratches on a thing and would on a person.

Earthquakes in Japan

Oct 19, 2018 21:32
Earthquakes in Japan

The surface of the earth is covered with 14 or 15 plate tectonics (also called "lithosphere"), and earthquakes occur when the strain on these plates is released.

Since Japan is placed on four tectonic plates, a lot of earthquakes occur compared with many other countries in the world.

The number of earthquakes including small earthquakes is about 5000 per year, and the number of earthquakes that you can feel the shaking is about 2000 per year.

This number seems to be second only to the one of Indonesia.

Incidentally, it is said that the country with the least natural disaster is Qatar.
日本の地震

地球の表面は、プレートと呼ばれる14〜15枚の岩盤で覆われており、このプレートのひずみが解放されるとき、地震が発生します。

日本のまわりは4枚のプレートが接しているため、世界的に見てもとても多くの地震が起こっています。

その数は、小さな地震も含めると年間約5000回であり、体感できるものでは約2000回だそうです。

この数は、インドネシアに次いで2番目に多いとのことです。

ちなみに、最も自然災害の発生件数が少ない国はカタールだそうです。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 artboy598's correction
I’ve thankfully never felt an earthquake before.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
> I’ve thankfully never felt an earthquake before.
Wow, that's good. I think that I feel an earthquake about once a month.

Doji (どじ - Stupid/Idiot)

Oct 18, 2018 12:35
Doji

I am probably a person called 'doji' (どじ).

Doji means a stupid mistake or a person who often makes such a mistake.

Its etymology has not been obvious yet, but there are various theories as follows:

A theory says that it comes from 'donchi' (鈍遅), which means that something is slow and dull.

A theory says that it comes from 'tochiru' (とちる), which means to make a mistake.

A theory says that it is short for 'tochimenbou' (とちめんぼう), which means to panic.

A theory says that it is short for 'dochiguchi' (どちぐち), which means that something is vague.

Incidentally, this term is similar to 'manuke' (間抜け - stupid) and 'bonkura' (ぼんくら - Idiot) that I introduced before.
どじ

恐らく私は「どじ」です。

「どじ」とは、間の抜けた失敗や、そのような失敗をする人を指す言葉です。

正確なことはわかっていませんが、「どじ」の語源は以下のように諸説あります。

遅くて鈍いことを意味する「鈍遅(どんち/どぢ)」が変化したという説。

失敗することを意味する「とちる」が変化したという説。

あわてるという意味の「とちめんぼう」を略したという説。

はっきりしないさまを意味する「どちぐち」を略したという説。

この言葉は、以前紹介した「間抜け」や「ぼんくら」という言葉と似ています。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
You, a どじ? No, you are a person who should be called 賢明。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Haha, I'm flattered.

Inase (いなせ)

Oct 17, 2018 21:24
Inase

We sometimes use the word 'inase' (いなせ) to describe a gallant and fresh young man.

This word comes from a hairstyle called 'inase icho' (鯔背銀杏), which was popular among young people in fish markets in the late Edo period.

'Ina' (鯔) means "flathead grey mullet," 'se' (背) means "back," so 'inase' means "flathead grey mullet's back."

In addition, 'icho' (銀杏) is short for 'icho-mage' (銀杏髷), which was the most common male hairstyle in the Edo period.

That is to say, 'inase icho' is a hairstyle looks like flathead grey mullet's back, and young men with such a hairstyle were masculine, so 'inase' came to have its current meaning.
いなせ

勇み肌でさっぱりしている若者のことを、「いなせ」と言うことがあります。

この言葉は、江戸時代後期に魚河岸の若者の間で流行した「鯔背銀杏」という髪型に由来します。

「鯔」は魚のボラのこと、「背」は "back" を意味するので、「鯔背」は "flathead grey mullet's back" を意味します。

また、「銀杏」は江戸時代に最も一般的だった男性の髪型「銀杏髷」を略したものです。

すなわち、「鯔背銀杏」とはボラの背に似た髪型のことで、その髪型をしていた若者は男気があったことから、現在の意味になったというわけです。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and helpful comment! :)
sjstrauss
You're welcome :)

Four Seasons in Japan

Oct 16, 2018 17:06
Four Seasons in Japan

Some Japanese people say "Japan has four seasons," but foreign people who heard that would be confused.

Of course, there are four seasons in many countries all over the world.

Then why some Japanese people believe that the four seasons are unique to Japan?

I think that this is because Japanese people have divided a year into every three months equally and distinctly, assigned four seasons there, and cherished traditional events of each season.

In fact, most traditional events in Japan are based on/deeply related to one of four seasons.

Therefore, I think that we should say "Japan cherishes traditional seasonal events," rather than "Japan has four seasons."
日本の四季

「日本には四季がある」と言う日本人を見かけますが、これを聞いた外国人は疑問に思うかもしれません。

もちろん四季は、世界中の多くの国々で存在します。

それではなぜ、四季は日本独自のものだと信じている日本人がいるのでしょうか。

これは、日本人が一年を3ヶ月ずつ均等に分けて四季を当てはめ、各季節の伝統行事を大切にしてきたたためであると考えられます。

実際、日本で行われている伝統行事の多くは、四季と関連しています。

このため、「日本には四季がある」ではなく、「日本は四季毎の伝統行事を大切にしている」などと言うのが良いかもしれません。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Of course, much of the world shares the concept of dividing a year into four seasons. But I think you are right to say Japan's traditional seasonal events are what makes it unique.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
No. 2 Oceansea's correction
I agree! That would be much less confusing!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Dobe and Biri

Oct 15, 2018 12:37
Dobe and Biri

Yesterday, while playing Super Mario Party, I used the Japanese term 'dobe' (ドベ), but its meaning didn't be conveyed.

According to the Internet, dobe is a dialect used in the area of western Japan, and instead 'biri' (ビリ) is mainly used in the area of eastern Japan.

Both dobe and biri are slang terms that have the same meaning, "bottom" or "last place."

The etymologies about these terms have not been clarified, but some people believe that biri comes from 'shiri' (尻), which means "hip."

In support of this theory, there is the fact that biri can imply "prostitute."
「ドベ」と「ビリ」

私は昨日マリオパーティをやっていて、「ドベ」という言葉を使いましたが、意味が伝わりませんでした。

調べてみると、「ドベ」は日本の西側で使われている方言らしく、東日本では代わりに「ビリ」が多く使われているようでした。

「ドベ」と「ビリ」はどちらも同じ意味を持つ俗語で、「最下位」であることを表します。

語源については不明ですが、「ビリ」は "hip" を意味する「尻」が変化したという説が有力です。

この裏付けとして、「ビリ」が「娼婦」を暗に意味するという事実もあります。
No. 1 Xishem's correction
(: Let me know if you have any questions.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)

> I'd probably never use "bottom" to mean "last place", but if you just mean that the terms can mean "bottom" in a different context, then it's no problem.

I used "bottom" as the similar sense of "last place" (e.g., "rank at the bottom" or "be placed in the bottom"). I think that it is also similar to "worst ranking," but it my thought wrong?
Xishem
I'd say "place" and "rank" are different. You can't use "rank" to describe a position in a race, for example, only "place".

Ranks are usually a way to separate people based on their merit in some way (which admittedly is what "places" in a race are doing too, but "rank" just doesn't work there), and sometimes this includes placing people into groups of rank rather than giving them individual ranks.

The most common example would be ranks in the military: lieutenant, captain, corporal, general, and so on; these are "ranks" in the sense that they place people relative to one another based on their merit, but there's more than person per rank.

You could never use "worst ranking" or "rank at the bottom" to describe someone's place in a race. "be placed in the bottom" would be fine if a bit unnatural, but it would probably just mean you're in one of the last few places (if there are 16 racers, 13th-16th maybe) rather than absolute last.

---

"I'm (in) last place."
"I'm (in) last."
"I'm dead last."

These are really the only ways that I can think of that I would say it. There may be others, but I can't think of any.

---

I just thought of something regarding rank. Rank is usually a more long-term idea. For example, imagine you were taking place in a tournament with many individual races in it, and each race gives you a certain number of points for 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.. After each race, each player would have a rank based on these points:

(1) Me -- 40 points
(2) You -- 30 points
(3) John -- 25 points
(4) Ashley -- 22 points

I think because the points are involved, it makes more sense to say "I'm ranked first", but "I'm in first place" works just as well.

Generally speaking, "ranking" is a more long-term phenomena (sometimes based on a point system), whereas "placing" can be used for both long-term things and short-term things (like position in a race).
Toru
Thank you so much for the kind explanations!
I understand well. :)

Sawari (さわり - Touch/Point)

Oct 14, 2018 22:02
Sawari

Today, I would like to introduce you to the term 'sawari' (さわり), which many Japanese misunderstand.

Originally, sawari is a noun that means "touch" or "feel."

However, this can be used for a story/song, such as 'hanashi/kyoku no sawari' (話/曲のさわり - "a sawari of a story/song").

According to the opinion poll, a majority of Japanese people interpret 'hanashi/kyoku no sawari' as "a beginning part of a story/song."

Actually, I also thought like that.

However, 'hanashi no sawari' means "the point of a story," and 'kyoku no sawari' means "the best part of a song."
さわり

今日は、とても多くの日本人が間違える言葉「さわり」を紹介します。

「さわり」は本来 "touch" や "feel" を意味する名詞です。

しかし、「話/曲のさわり」のようにして本や話、曲に対して使うこともできます。

そして世論調査によると、過半数の日本人が「話/曲のさわり」を「話/曲の冒頭部分」と解釈しているようです。

実際、私もそうでした。

しかし、「話のさわり」は「話の要点」、「曲のさわり」は「曲の一番の聞かせどころ」を意味するのです。
No. 1 Kat's correction
I learned something. ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post again! :)

The Number of Islands in Japan

Oct 13, 2018 23:46
The Number of Islands in Japan

Japan is classified as 'shimaguni' (島国).

Since 'shima' (島) means "island" and 'guni/kuni' (国) means "country," shimaguni means countries whose primary territory consists of islands.

The definition of shima (島 - "island") in Japan is a land that is surrounded by water, has an outer circumference of 100 meters or more, and was made naturally.

According to this definition, the number of islands in Japan is 6852.

However, the number of islands that have residents (or a resident) is about only 400, and all other islands are uninhabited.
日本の島の数

日本は「島国」に分類されます。

「島」は "island," 「国」は "country" を意味するため、「島国」は "island country," すなわち領土が島で構成される国のことを意味します。

日本における「島」とは、水で囲まれた外周100m以上の陸地で、自然にできたもののことです。

この定義に従うと、日本の島の数は6852島となります。

ただし、そのうち人が住んでいる有人島は400島程度で、その他の島は無人島だそうです。
No. 1 Kat's correction
Wow, that is a lot of islands!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
Yes, but I heard that Norway has about 240,000 islands.
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
That's nothing compared to the Philippines and Indonesia! 7,641 and 13,466!
Toru
Thank you for the comments. :)
Yes, I think that the number of islands in Japan is under 10th in the world.

Monpe (もんぺ - A Pair of Work Pants for Women)

Oct 12, 2018 21:07
Monpe

A pair of work pants having a shape of hakama (袴 - somewhat like baggy pants that were tight around the ankle or knee) for women are called 'monpe' (もんぺ).

Since its waist part is loose, it is possible to put a garment for the upper half of the body in it.

The etymology about it has not been cleared, but it is thought that it comes from 'momohiki/momohaki' (股引/股はき - longjohns), or the fact that 'Monbe' (門兵衛) invented it.

However, note that if you write it as モンペ in Katakana, it can be short for "monster parents," which means "over-bearing parents."
もんぺ

袴の形状をした女性用の作業服、特にそのボトムスのことを、「もんぺ」と言います。

腰回りがゆったりしており、着物の裾を中に入れることができるようになっています。

正確な語源はわかっていませんが、「股引」「股はき」が変化したという説や、門兵衛という人が考案したからという説などがあります。

ただし、これを「モンペ」とカタカナで書くと、「モンスターペアレント」の略を意味することになるので注意して下さい。
No. 1 notruescotsman's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Abazure (あばずれ - Hussy)

Oct 11, 2018 20:18
Abazure

Previously, I introduced you to the Japanese terms 'otenba' (おてんば) and 'jajauma,' both of which mean a spirited girl who has a mannish character.
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/93203187067698255124691996531191743534
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/102929135995241882173136911457932184524

When a woman goes beyond what these terms mean, she is brazen and immoral, and she could be called 'abazure' (あばずれ) in Japanese.

There are several theories about its etymology, but the most accepted one is that 'aba' (あば) comes from 'abare-mono' (暴れ者 - "ruffian") and 'zure' comes from 'seken-zure' (世間擦れ - "ignorant").

In the past, this term was also used for men, but these days it is mostly used for women.

As mentioned before, I like otenba and jajauma girls, but I am scared of abazure.
あばずれ

私は以前、男勝りの活発な女子を意味する「おてんば」と「じゃじゃ馬」という日本語を紹介しました。
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/93203187067698255124691996531191743534
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/102929135995241882173136911457932184524

これらの域を超え、人擦れして品行が悪く厚かましい女性のことを、「あばずれ」と言うことがあります。

語源に関する説は幾つかありますが、「暴れ者」などの「あば」に、「世間擦れ」の意味の「擦れ」がついたという説が有力です。

かつては男性に対しても使われた言葉ですが、現在では女性に使われることがほとんどです。

私は「おてんば」と「じゃじゃ馬」くらいであれば好きですが、「あばずれ」は怖いです。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
Perfect! And very informative :)
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)

Busu (ブス - Troll)

Oct 10, 2018 16:00
Busu

I do not like the Japanese term 'busu' (ブス).

Busu is an insulting slang term that refers to people (especially women) with ugly appearance.

There are several theories about its etymology, but the most accepted one is the following:

Busu can be written as 附子 in kanji, and here it means aconite root.

Since the aconite root contains a highly toxic venom, if you eat it without attenuating the venom, your nerves will be paralyzed and be able not to make facial expressions.

Because of this, expressionless people came to be called busu, and later, this has changed to describe ugly people.
ブス

私は「ブス」という言葉が好きではありません。

「ブス」とは、容姿が劣る人や醜い人(特に女性)を指す、侮辱的な日本の俗語です。

語源に関する説は幾つかありますが、有力な説は以下のようなものです。

「ブス」は漢字で「附子」と書くことができ、このときトリカブトの塊根を意味します。

トリカブトの塊根には猛毒が含まれており、毒の処理をせずに口に含むと神経が麻痺し、無表情になります。

ここから無表情な人のことを「ブス」と呼ぶようになり、転じて醜い人を表すようになったそうです。
No. 1 chibi-lang's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 Fifi's correction
Toru
Wow, I didn't know the fact, thank you for letting me know that!

Tōtō toto Tottōto?

Oct 9, 2018 13:31
Tōtō toto Tottōto?

Yesterday, I introduced you to a phrase that uses a lot of 'ka' (か).

After that, when I was browsing the Internet, I found another interesting phrase using the dialect in Hakata -- which was introduced by Japanese comedians.

It is "Tōtō Toto tottōto?" (とうとう toto とっとーと?).

'Tōtō' is a common Japanese term meaning "finally" or "eventually," 'Toto' means a kind of lottery, 'to' (と/獲) means "to get/obtain," and 'tōto' (とーと) is a dialect that means "Did you do ~?"

That is to say, "Tōtō Toto tottōto?" means "Did you finally get/win the Toto?"
とうとうとととっとーと?

昨日は「か」ばかりを使った文章を紹介しました。

その後、インターネットを見ていたら、あるお笑い芸人が博多弁を使った「と」ばかりの文章を紹介していました。

それは「とうとうとととっとーと?」です。

「とうとう」は「遂に」を意味する一般的な日本語で、「とと」は「totoくじ」のこと、「と」は "" を意味する「獲る」を、「とーと」は「~したの?」を意味する博多弁です。

すなわち「とうとうとととっとーと?」は、「ついに toto くじを手に入れた(当てた)の?」という意味になります。
No. 1 Xishem's correction
Interesting writing! Let me know if you have any questions.

-----

This reminds me of a construction in English:

"Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo."

It's a grammatically correct sentence that uses 3 different meanings for the word "buffalo".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_buffalo_Buffalo_buffalo_buffalo_buffalo_Buffalo_buffalo — if you want to read more about it.
Xishem
  • After that, when / while I was browsing the Internet, I found another interesting phrase using the [dialect in Hakata / Hakata dialect], which was introduced / created by Japanese comedians.

    Using "which" after an em dash ("--" or "—") doesn't work. It's one of the few cases where the em dash fails. If you want to use an em dash still, maybe:

    "... Hakata dialect — this dialect was created... "

I wanted to clarify. Using a relative clause immediately after an em dash doesn't work. In this case, that relative clause begins with "which", but it's the relative clause that makes it invalid.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the interesting sentence!
I understand well. (^^)

Kakā Kā KāKa?

Oct 8, 2018 18:20
Kakā Kā KāKa?

When reading a book, I found an interesting phrase that uses the dialect in Toyama.

It is "Kakā kā kāka?" (かかーかーかーか?).

In Toyama, people sometimes call their mothers 'kaka' (かか), and say 'ka' (か) to describe "this."

In addition, in Japanese, 'ka' (蚊) means "mosquito," and we say '~ka?' (~か?) when asking something.

That is to say, "kakā kā kā-kā?" means that "Mother, is this a mosquito?"

However, I think that if someone says such a phrase suddenly, even people in Toyama will be a bit confused.
かかーかーかーか?

本読をんでいて、富山の方言を使った面白い言葉を見つけました。

それは「かかーかーかーか?」です。

富山では、「母親」のことを「かか」、「これ」のことを「か」と言うことがあります。

そして、日本語では "mosquito" のことを「蚊(か)」と言い、何かを尋ねるときに「~か?」と言うことがあります。

すなわち「かかーかーかーか?」は、「母さん、これは蚊?」という意味になります。

ただ、急にこんなことを言われたら、富山の人でもさすがに少し戸惑うと思います。
No. 1 Sqweeb-SquidWeeb's correction
Very interesting!
Reminds me of that one Chinese poem were they say "shi" a lot.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know that!
I will search for the interesting poem on the Internet. :)

Furachi (不埒 - Lawless)

Oct 7, 2018 19:40
Furachi

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese phrase 'rachi ga akanai' (埒があかない - going nowhere).

There is another Japanese term that uses 'rachi' (埒 - literally "enclosures/fences") -- it is 'furachi' (不埒).

Since 'fu' (不) is a negative prefix, furachi is a word that negates enclosures or fences.

Here, enclosures or fences cam imply "boundary" or "regulation," hence furachi means lawless, rude, or unreasonable things.

In my opinion, furachi often includes sexual meaning these days.

Also, furachi can mean 'rachi ga akanai,' but I rarely see its usage.
不埒

昨日は「埒があかない」という言葉を紹介しました。

「馬場の周囲の囲いや柵」を意味する「埒」を使った他の成句として、「不埒」があります。

「不」は否定を意味する接頭辞であるため、「不埒」は「囲いや柵」を否定することになります。

「囲いや柵」は「境界」や「規制」などを示唆することもできることから、「不埒」は「道理に外れた不届きなこと」を意味します。

最近では、「不埒」は性的な意味で使われることが多いと思います。

また、「不埒」は「埒があかないこと」を意味することもできますが、私はその用法をほとんど見たことがありません。
No. 1 中村ジェイ's correction
Why does it have a sexual meaning behind it? In fact, what's the sexual meaning of furachi?
Toru
I'm sorry, there might not have been enough explanation.

The basic meaning of furachi is "lawless" or "unreasonable," but it is often used for sexual offending behavior, so it includes the nuance of "sexual."

These are the related entries:
Keshikaran (けしからん - Unreasonable)
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/298381523735349384204136690338017417283

Ikagawashii (いかがわしい)
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/164002112168768243793801527488059930371

Rachi ga Akanai (埒があかない - Going Nowhere)

Oct 6, 2018 14:48
Rachi ga Akanai

These days, my works are increasing, and there is no end in sight.

Things do not progress or are not settled like this case can be described as 'rachi ga akanai' (埒があかない) in Japanese.

'Rachi' (埒) means enclosures or fences that are used around a riding ground, and 'akanai' (あかない) means that something does not open.

In a horse racing, the competition does not start until the fences open.

Because of this, it is thought that rachi ga akanai has come to have its current meaning.
埒があかない

最近、仕事がどんどん増え、作業を進めてもなかなか終わりが見えてきません。

このように、事態が進展しないことや、物事の決着が着かないことを、「埒があかない」と言います。

「埒」とは馬場の周囲の囲いや柵のことで、「あかない」は "something does not open" を意味します。

馬を走らせて速さを競う「競べ馬」の際、柵が開くまでは競技が始まりません。

このことから、「埒があかない」は現在の意味で使われるようになったと考えられています。
No. 1 seeker77's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
seeker77
You're welcome.

iPhone Xs

Oct 5, 2018 20:35
iPhone Xs

About three months ago, I bought a smartphone equipped with a physical keyboard, BlackBerry Key2.

Unfortunately, various problems occurred while using the smartphone; some applications often crashed, terrible noises occurred during a call, and the sound sometimes stopped ringing.

Therefore, I decided to buy iPhone Xs this Monday.

(The big price of 150,000 yen put a big dent in my wallet.)

It has only been a few days since purchasing, but I have been able to use it comfortably without any problems so far.

The only regret I have is that the usability of the BlackBerry Key2's keyboard was really comfortable.
iPhone Xs

私は約3ヶ月前に、キーボード付きのスマートフォン BlackBerry Key2 を買いました。

しかし、残念なことによく使うアプリケーションがよく落ちたり、通話時にひどいノイズが発生したり、音が出なくなったりと、さまざまな不具合が発生してしまいました。

そこで今週の月曜日に、iPhone Xs を買うことに決めました。

(15万円という価格は私の財布にとって大打撃でした。)

まだ購入して数日しか経っていませんが、特に不具合なく快適に使えています。

BlackBerry Key2 は、キーボードの使い心地がとても良かっただけに残念です。
No. 1 Marina's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Tama no Koshi ni Noru (玉の輿に乗る - Cinderella Story)

Oct 4, 2018 16:54
Tama no Koshi ni Noru

When a woman marries a rich or high-ranked man, and she herself comes to have such a status, we describe it as the phrase 'tama no koshi ni noru' (玉の輿に乗る).

'Tama' (玉) means something beautiful or jewelry, and 'koshi' (輿) means a vehicle carried by several people that high-ranked people ride.

That is to say, 'tama no koshi' means a noble and beautiful vehicle for high-ranked people.

If a low-ranked woman married a high-ranked man, she would ride a tama no koshi.

Because of this, we have come to say 'tama no koshi ni noru' (玉の輿に乗る - literally "to ride a tama no koshi") to describe such a woman.
玉の輿に乗る

女性が資産家や高い身分の男性と結婚し、自身もそのような立場になることを「玉の輿に乗る」と言います。

「玉」は美しいものや宝石を、「輿」は身分の高い人が乗る人力の乗り物です。

すなわち「玉の輿」とは、身分の高い人が乗る立派で美しい乗り物のことを指します。

身分の低い女性が高い身分の男性と結婚すると、この玉の輿に乗ることになります。

そこから、女性が立身出世することを「玉の輿に乗る」と表現するようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Raigetsu's correction
That was again, very educational!^_^

ありがとう先生!^_^
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm flattered. (^^*)
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
This phenomenon is called Hypergamy in the West.
Toru
Thank you for letting me know the interesting term! :)
This is the first time I've heard of it.

Soppo wo Muku (そっぽを向く - Looking Away)

Oct 3, 2018 22:21
Soppo wo Muku

To describe that someone looks away, refuses to see something, or becomes uncooperative, you can use the Japanese phrase 'soppo wo muku' (そっぽを向く).

'Muku' (向く) is a common Japanese term that means "to look toward," but 'soppo' (そっぽ) is basically used only in this phrase.

Soppo is written as 外方 in kanji, and as these kanji characters imply, it means "another direction" or "outside direction."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'soppo wo muku' is "to look toward another/outside direction."
そっぽを向く

相手を見ずによその方を向くことや、協調しない態度をとることを「そっぽを向く」と言うことがあります。

「向く」は "to look toward" を意味する一般的な日本語ですが、「そっぽ」は基本的に「そっぽを向く」の表現の中でしか使われません。

「そっぽ」は漢字で「外方」と書き、漢字が意味するとおり、外の方向 ("another direction" or "outside direction") を意味します。

すなわち「そっぽを向く」は、"to look toward another/outside direction" という意味となります。
No. 1 Yukinekorin's correction
Really helpful as always! Thank you for writing these all the time. ^^

Can I use it like that?
隊長を逆らうように、彼が硬い目でそっぽを向いた。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

> 隊長を逆らうように、彼が硬い目でそっぽを向いた。
Yes, you can use it something like that, but it will be better to modify several parts.

[Modification of Case Particle]
隊長 'に' 逆らうように、彼 'は' 硬い目でそっぽを向いた。

[Modification of Expression]
隊長に逆らうように、彼は '険しい' 目でそっぽを向いた。

The expression 硬い目 is rarely used. I think that 険しい目 (grim eye/hard stare) is more appropriate.
Yukinekorin
Ah, thanks for correcting my sentence as well!! ^^
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
Very useful entry, as always! Thank you!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Kuwasemono (食わせもの)

Oct 2, 2018 21:47
Kuwasemono

Two days ago, I introduced the term 'kuwasu' (食わす) in my post.

In addition, I explained that the literal meaning of kuwasu is "to feed someone" or "to have someone eat," but it can also mean "to deceive."

There is a term that uses the kuwasu meaning "to deceive" -- it is 'kuwasemono' (食わせもの).

Kuwasemono means an insidious person who cannot be judged by its appearance, or something fake that has only a good look.

If you want to use it as the former meaning, write 食わせ者 by using 者 (mono - "person").

If you want to use it as the latter meaning, write 食わせ物 by using 物 (mono - "thing").
食わせもの

一昨日の記事の中で、「食わす」という表現を紹介しました。

そして、「食わす」の文字通りの意味は "to feed someone" や "to have someone eat" ですが、"to deceive" を意味することもあると説明しました。

"To deceive" を意味する「食わす」を使った表現に「食わせもの」があります。

「食わせもの」は、見た目では判断できない油断のならない者や、見かけは良いが実はいい加減なものを意味します。

前者を意味で使いたいときは "thing" を意味する「物」を使い、「食わせ物」と書きます。

後者の意味で使うたいときは "person" を意味する「者」を使い、「食わせ者」と書きます。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
thanks for the info
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

The Meaning of 'Ippai'

Oct 1, 2018 12:39
The Meaning of 'Ippai'

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese phrase 'ippai kuwasu' (一杯食わす), which means to deceive someone thoroughly.

In that post, I explained that 'ippai' (一杯) means "a cup of something" or "a bowl of something."

In fact, since 'i/ichi' (一) means "one" and 'hai/pai' (杯) means "cup" or "bowl," the literal meaning of ippai is as described above.

However, when you use ippai as an adverb or an adjective, its meaning becomes "full" or "many."

In this case, the characters 一杯 implies that a cup/bowl is full of something.
「一杯」の意味

昨日は、誰かをうまく騙すことを意味する「一杯食わす」という表現を紹介しました。

その中で、「一杯」は "a cup of something" や "a bowl of something" を意味すると説明しました。

実際、「一」は "one," 「杯」は "cup" や "bowl" を意味するので、文字通りの意味は前述のとおりとなります。

しかし、「一杯」を副詞もしくは形容詞として使うとき、「たくさんの」という意味になります。

このとき、「一杯」という字は、容器に何かが満ち溢れるほど入っていることを示唆しています。
No. 1 ganbat2's correction
Good job. I'm not entirely sure why you switched between single quotes and double quotes.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I've used single quotes for Japanese words that appeared for the first time, and double quotes for English terms. Also, I've used single quotes as a substitute for italic notation. In general sentences, italicizing is only used when the term appears for the first time, so I removed single quotes after the second appearance.
ganbat2
>In general sentences, italicizing is only used when the term appears for the first time, so I removed single quotes after the second appearance.

^ Do you have a source for the above statement?

As far as I know, the rules regarding the usage of italics and single/double quotation marks are more complicated than this. For instance, I am pretty sure that one does not simply replace italics with single quotes. They both have their own specific usages, I would say. However, this is outside my realm of expertise as I am not a teacher but here is a link for a bit more information:
https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/single-quotation-marks-versus-double-quotation-marks?page=1

There are other rules of engagement and I encourage you to read up on them.
Toru
Thank you for the comment! :)
I will check the website.

> ^ Do you have a source for the above statement?
I often read Wikipedia, and I think that the rules are used there.
e.g., https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futon
Also, I've referred to the several Lang-8 users' opinions related to the usage.

> I am pretty sure that one does not simply replace italics with single quotes.
Of course, I understand the fact that italics cannot be replaced with single quotes. Unfortunately, this website (Lang-8) doesn't have the function of italicizing, so I've replaced it with single quotes temporarily. When I rewrite my posts on my blog, I will use italics.
Toru
I'm not sure whether or not this is an appropriate source, but the following site says:
"if the writer feels that a word is largely unfamiliar to the intended audience, italicizing it may be the reasonable thing to do, dictionary entry notwithstanding. If the word is going to be used frequently in the text, then it need be italicized only the first time it is introduced."
https://www.dailywritingtips.com/italicizing-foreign-words/
ganbat2
>I often read Wikipedia, and I think that the rules are used there.

I highly recommend against utilizing this method. Wikipedia is not an authoritative source and in many cases is not accepted to be used as such when writing papers in American schools.

The link I referred you to referenced the Modern Language Association (MLA). This is one of the most authoritative sources of information regarding the correct usage of English in the USA. I recommend this source.
https://www.mla.org/Publications/Bookstore/Nonseries/MLA-Handbook-Eighth-Edition

>Unfortunately, this website (Lang-8) doesn't have the function of italicizing, so I've replaced it with single quotes temporarily. When I rewrite my posts on my blog, I will use italics.

^ I forgot about the limitations of this website. As long as you are aware of the rules, great! Keep up the good work!
Toru
Thank you so much for letting me know that.
I will buy the book and read it. (^^)

Ippai Kuwasu (一杯食わす - Pulling a Trick)

Sep 30, 2018 19:49
Ippai Kuwasu

We sometimes use the phrase 'ippai kuwasu' to mean to deceive someone well.

'Ipppai' (一杯) means "a cup of something" or "a bowl of something," and 'kuwasu' (食わす) means "to feed someone" or "to have someone eat."

That is to say, the literal meaning of ippai kuwasu is "to feed someone to a bowl of something" or "to have someone eat a bowl of something."

According to the Internet, kuwasu can mean 'damasu' (騙す - "deceive"), but I could not find the detailed etymology.

Some people think that it comes from an old Japanese tale that a raccoon dog had a person eat a bowl of fake rice.
一杯食わす

うまく誰かを騙すことを、日本語で「一杯食わす」と言うことがあります。

「一杯」は "a cup of something" や "a bowl of something," 「食わす」は "to feed someone" や "to have someone eat" を意味します。

すなわち「一杯食わす」とは、"to feed someone to a bowl of something" もしくは "to have someone eat a bowl of something" という意味になります。

インターネットによると「食わす」という言葉に「騙す」という意味が含まれるようですが、詳細な由来はわかりませんでした。

ある説によると、狸が人間をだまして偽物のご飯を食べさせたという昔話から来ているとのことです。
No. 1 A and C's correction
Thank you, I learned something new as well!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
A and C
There was very little to correct, thank you for the mini cultural expression lesson!

Ne wo Ageru (音を上げる - Whining)

Sep 29, 2018 14:06
Ne wo Ageru

I am about to do an action called 'ne wo ageru' (音を上げる) in Japanese.

Ne wo ageru is a phrase that means that someone whines, screams out, or gives up because it is difficult for him/her to endure suffering.

Since 'ne' (音) means "sound," "voice," or "cry," and 'ageru' (上げる) means "to generate," the literal meaning of ne wo ageru is "to generate a cry."

【Example sentence】
Shigoto ga tsurakute ne wo ageru (仕事が辛くて音を上げる - "I whine about my work because it is too hard.")
音を上げる

私は今、音を上げそうです。

「音を上げる」とは、苦しさに耐えられずに弱音を吐くことや、悲鳴を上げること、降参することなどを意味する言葉です。

「音」は "sound" や "voice," "cry," 「上げる」は "to generate" を意味するので、「音を上げる」の文字通りの意味は "to generate a cry" となります。

【例文】
仕事が辛くて音を上げる。
No. 1 Raigetsu's correction
Wow, I really like what you wrote about!^_^

It is so educational!^_^
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. (^^)

Garakuta (ガラクタ - Junk)

Sep 28, 2018 21:48
Garakuta

There are several 'gatrakuta' (ガラクタ) in my room.

Garakuta means something worthless, junk, or useless.

'Gara' (ガラ) comes from the onomatopoeia 'garagara' (ガラガラ), which means that things touch or bump into each other, and there are two theories about 'kuta' (クタ) -- one is that it is short for 'akuta' (芥), which means "garbage" or "dust," or it comes from 'kuchi' (朽ち), which means that something decays.

In the Edo period, garakuta was used to mean boring people or rascals in addition to its current meaning.
ガラクタ

私の部屋には幾つかの「ガラクタ」があります。

「ガラクタ」とは、価値のないものや、用途のないものを指す言葉です。

「ガラ」は物が触れ合う音を表す擬態語「ガラガラ」から、「クタ」はゴミやチリを意味する「芥(あくた)」の略か、「朽ち」が変化したものだと考えられています。

江戸時代には、現代の意味に加えて、つまらない人間ややくざ者のことも指していたようです。
No. 1 Brittany's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 Raigetsu's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
Raigetsu
Welcome Mr Toru!

I like your post because it is very educational.^_^

Shinjū (心中 - Love Suicide)

Sep 27, 2018 13:13
Shinjū

I introduced you to the Japanese word 'shinchū' (心中 - "feeling") in my yesterday's post.

Actually, the kanji 心中 can also be read as 'shinjū,' and its meaning is very different from the meaning of shinchū.

Shinjū originally meant that a man and a woman who love each other commit suicide at the same time by mutual agreement.

These days shinjū can also mean that several people commit suicide at the same time.

It is said that shinjū comes from 'shinjūdate' (心中立), which means to be loyal to someone.

This implies that the ultimate loyal act between a man and a woman is a love suicide.
心中

昨日の表現の中で、"feeling" を意味する「心中(しんちゅう)」という言葉が出てきました。

実は、「心中」という漢字は「しんじゅう」と読むこともでき、このときの意味は大きく異なります。

心中(しんじゅう)は、もともと相思相愛の男女が、合意の上で同時に自殺することを意味することを意味します。

転じて、現在では複数人が同時に自殺することも意味します。

この言葉は、他人に義理立てをすることを意味する「心中立(しんじゅうだて)」から来ています。

男女間で義理立てをする究極の形が、相対死というわけです。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Shinshū Osasshi Shimasu (心中お察しします - You Have My Sympathies)

Sep 26, 2018 15:04
Shinshū Osasshi Shimasu

When unhappy or sad events happen to someone, we sometimes say 'shinchū osasshi shimasu' (心中お察しします) out of sympathy.

'Shin' (心) means "heart," 'chū' (中) means "inside," 'o' (お) is a polite prefix, and 'sassuru' (察する) means "to guess something," "to infer something," or "to get a message."

That is to say, this phrase means that "I can infer and understand inside your heart (your feelings)."

You can also say 'okimochi osasshi itashimasu' (お気持ちお察しいたします) by using 'okimochi' (お気持ち - literally "feeling") instead of shinchū.
心中お察しします

誰かに悲しいことや辛いことがあったとき、その人のことを思いやって「心中お察しします」と言うことがあります。

「心」は "heart," 「中」は "inside," 「察する」は "to guess something" や "to infer something," "to get a message" を意味します。

すなわちこの表現は、「あなたの気持ちを推測して理解できます」ということを意味します。

「心中」の代わりに "feeling" を意味する「お気持ち」を使い、「お気持ちお察しいたします」のように言うこともできます。
No. 1 dms727's correction
Very well written. I made only one optional suggestion.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Sound Imitation Words for Describing Walking Part 2

Sep 25, 2018 17:23
Sound Imitation Words for Describing Walking Part 2

Yesterday, I introduced you to the three sound imitation words that describe walking.

Today I would like to introduce 'fura fura' (ふらふら) and 'bura bura' (ぶらぶら).

Fura fura describes that something is shaking unsteadily or someone walks around without awareness or purpose.

This phrase can also be used to describe that your physical condition is bad.

Bura bura describes that something is shaking or someone walks around slowly.

This phrase can also be used to describe that someone lives every day without doing what he/she should have to do.
歩くさまを表す擬態語 Part 2

昨日は、3つの歩くさまを表す擬態語を紹介しました。

今日は、「ふらふら」と「ぶらぶら」を紹介します。

「ふらふら」は、不安定に揺れ動くさまや、自覚や目的なく動き回るさまを表します。

この言葉は、体調が悪いさまを表すこともできます。

「ぶらぶら」は、何かが揺れ動くさまや、のんびり歩き回るさまを表します。

この言葉は、なすこともなく毎日を暮らすさまを表すこともできます。
No. 1 annkeese's correction
"Sound imitation words" is a little awkward. Are you saying these words sounds like what they mean?

Very good job overall though!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

> Are you saying these words sounds like what they mean?
Yes, actually I wrote "onomatopoeias" in the previous entry, but a user taught me that "sound imitation" is easier to understand.
annkeese
You're welcome! Ahh yes. Onomatopoeia is more precise to me, but i could see why someone would say that sound imitation is easier to understand. Maybe you could have both in your titles?

For example: Sound Imitation Words for Describing Walking Part 2 (aka onomatopoeia)


"aka' is a commonly used acronym that means "also known as"
Toru
Thank you so much for your suggestion! It's very helpful. :)

Onomatopoeias for Expressing Walking Part 1

Sep 24, 2018 20:45
Onomatopoeias for Expressing Walking Part 1

There are many onomatopoeias in Japanese that are used to express walking.

Today I would like to introduce 'teku teku' (てくてく), 'suta suta' (すたすた), and 'toko toko' (とことこ) from among them.

All of these onomatopoeias mean that someone walks at the same pace without looking to the right or left.

Teku teku is often used to express that someone walks a long distance.

Suta suta is often used to express that someone walks at a brisk pace.

Toko toko is often used to express that a child or woman walks with small strides.
歩くさまを表す擬態語 Part 1

日本語には、歩くさまを表し擬態語が数多く存在します。

今日はその中から、「てくてく」「すたすた」「とことこ」を紹介します。

これらはいずれも、わき目もふらずに同じペースでひたすら歩くさまを表します。

「てくてく」は、長い距離を歩き続けるさまを表す際によく使われます。

「すたすた」は、足早に歩くさまを表す際によく使われます。

「とことこ」は、子どもなどが小またで足早に歩くさまを表す際によく使われます。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
It’s cute
Toru
Yes, I also think it's childlike and cute. :)
No. 2 tony's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
tony
いいえ、どういたしまして。

Tawawa (たわわ - Growing Richly)

Sep 23, 2018 12:01
Tawawa

I think that there is less opportunity to use it, but I like the term 'tawawa' (たわわ).

Tawawa is an onomatopoeia that means that fruits or cereals grow richly.

This term comes from the verb 'tawamu' (たわむ), which means that trees or sticks bow or bend.

Since branches of trees bow when a lot of crops grow, tawawa has come to have the meaning of "rich."

In most cases, tawawa is used by combining with the verb 'minoru' (実る - literally "grow"), such as '___ ga tawawa ni minoru' (~がたわわに実る - ___ grows richly).
たわわ

あまり使う機会が多くありませんが、私は「たわわ」という表現が好きです。

「たわわ」とは、果物や穀物が豊かに実るさまを表す擬態語です。

この言葉は、木や棒などがしなったり曲がったりすることを意味する動詞「たわむ」から派生しました。

多くの実がつけば木の枝がしなることから、たわわは「豊かに実る」ことを意味するというわけです。

多くの場合、「実る」という動詞を組み合わせて「~がたわわに実る」のように言います。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
Hmm, I didn't know たわわ was meant to apply to cereals and fruits. I thought it was supposed to apply to something else.

Garuda
I also thought of this anime when I saw this post (*´ω`*)
Toru
Haha, I didn't know 月曜日のたわわ, but indeed recent young people sometimes use tawawa to express big tits.
No. 2 Garuda's correction
Great job! 本当によく書けました。

私の初めての「とわわ」と聞いた時はKiwiさんにポストされた「月曜日のたわわ」です。「たわわ」のことを教えていただきありがとうございます!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments!
最近では、本来の「果物や穀物が豊かに実る」という意味よりも、「月曜日のたわわ」にあるように別の意味で使われることのほうが多いかもしれません(笑)

Tsukanukoto (つかぬこと - By the Way)

Sep 22, 2018 13:50
Tsukanukoto

When asking someone for something, especially when it has nothing to do with the topic so far, we say 'tsukanukoto wo ukagai masuga' (つかぬことを伺いますが) or 'tsukanukoto wo otazune shimasuga' (つかぬことをお尋ねしますが).

'Ukagau' (伺う) is a humble form of 'kiku' (聞く - "ask/hear"), 'tazuneru' (尋ねる) is a polite form of kiku, and both of which are used in daily conversation.

On the other hand, 'tsukanukoto' (つかぬこと) is usually used only in the above phrases.

'Tsuku' (つく) means "to attach," 'nu' (ぬ) is a negative suffix, and 'koto' (こと) means "thing."

That is to say, tsukanukoto means that the thing doesn't attach, and it implies that the topic/question doesn't related to the previous one.
つかぬこと

誰かに何かを聞くとき、特にそれがこれまでの流れとは関係のないとき、「つかぬことを伺いますが」や「つかぬことをお尋ねしますが」のように言います。

「伺う」は「聞く」の謙譲語、「尋ねる」は「聞く」の丁寧な表現で、どちらも日常的によく使われます。

一方、「つかぬこと」は、ほとんど上記の表現の中でしか使われません。

「つく」は "to attach," 「ぬ」は否定を意味する接尾辞、「こと」は "thing" を意味します。

すなわち「つかぬこと」とは、「直前の話につかないことですが」ということを表しているというわけです。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Toru
Thank you so much always for reading my post! :)
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
cool, it's the equivalent of a non sequitur in English.
Toru
Thank you so much for letting me know the interesting expression! (^^)
Kiwi
Actually, the correct expression is apropos of nothing

Muteppou (無鉄砲 - Reckless)

Sep 21, 2018 20:43
Muteppou

I am not, but some people are called 'muteppou' (無鉄砲) in Japanese.

Muteppou means that someone acts recklessly without considering the consequences.

'Mu' (無) means "nothing" and 'teppou' (鉄砲) means "gun."

Therefore, some people probably think that the etymology of muteppou is that someone attacks an enemy's camp without having guns.

However, it is said that muteppou comes from 'mutehou' (無手法).

The literal meaning of mutepou is "not having anything in one's hands" or "there is no means," and it has come to have the current meaning.
無鉄砲

私は違いますが、世の中には「無鉄砲」な人がいます。

「無鉄砲」とは、先のことをよく考えず、強引に行動するさまを表す言葉です。

「無」は "nothing,"「鉄砲」は "gun" を意味します。

そのため、「無鉄砲」の語源は「鉄砲を持たず無謀に突っ込むこと」だと思うかもしれません。

しかし、「無鉄砲」は「無手法」の音が変化したものだと考えられています。

「無手法」の文字通りの意味は「手に何も持たないこと」や「手段がないこと」であり、そこから現代の意味に派生したようです。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Toru
Thank you so much always for reading my post. :)
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
I love this expression!
Toru
Thank you for the comment! :)
No. 3 sjstrauss's correction
Interesting, I didn't know this word! Thank you for sharing :)
Toru
Thank you so much for your advice! (^^)
sjstrauss
You’re welcome ^ ^

Te wo Kiru (手を切る - Washing One's Hands of)

Sep 20, 2018 14:55
Te wo Kiru

There is a Japanese expression, 'te wo kiru' (手を切る).

Since 'te' (手) means "hand" and 'kiru' (切る) means "to cut" or "to cut off," the literal meaning of te wo kiru is "to cut one's hand."

Here, te is used as a word meaning a relationship with someone.

Therefore, te wo kiru means to cut off a relationship with someone.

In particular, this expression is often used to cut off a bad, inappropriate, or sexual relationship.

In English, you can probably say "to wash one's hands of ___" to mean te wo kiru.
手を切る

日本語には「手を切る」という表現があります。

「手」は "hand," 「切る」は "to cut" を意味するので、「手を切る」の文字通りの意味は "to cut one's hand" となります。

ここで、「手」は人との関わり合いを表す言葉として使用されています。

すなわち「手を切る」とは、誰かとの関係を絶つことを意味します。

特に、悪い関係や、男女関係を断ち切る場合に使われることが多いです。

英語では、「洗う」を意味する "wash" を用いて、"to wash one's hands of ___" のように表現されます。
No. 1 Nicholas's correction

Your English is great, and that is an interesting Japanese expression! To "wash one's hands of someone" in English definitely means to cut off your relationship with that person, but it doesn't necessarily refer to a romantic relationship. But you could use it in that case!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and comments! (^^)

Shira wo Kiru (しらを切る - Playing Innocent)

Sep 19, 2018 19:49
Shira wo Kiru

Have you ever pretended you don't know something, even though you know it?

Such an action is referred to as 'shira wo kiru' (しらを切る) in Japanese.

There are two theories about the etymology of 'shira' (しら); one is that it is short for 'shiranu' (知らぬ - literally "don't know"), and the other is that it comes from 'shira' (白 - literally "white"), which means "pure" or "serious."

In addition, 'kiru' (切る) usually means "to cut," but here it means "to take a noticeable action or attitude."
しらを切る

何かを知っているのに、知らないふりをしたことはありますか?

そのような行動をとることを、日本語で「しらを切る」と言います。

「しら」は「知らぬ」の略という説と、「純粋」「真面目」を意味する「しら(白)」からきているという説があります。

「切る」は通常 "to cut" を意味しますが、ここでは「際立った行動や態度をとる」ことを意味します。
No. 1 Rick M's correction
Your entry is perfect! A very interesting look into the etymology of a common phrase!
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post!
I'm flattered. (^^)
Rick M
You're very welcome! Perhaps the only thing to be careful of when using quotation marks is: "XXX". rather than "XXX." (note where the '.' is in relation to the "")
No. 2 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

Shiru Hito zo Shiru (知る人ぞ知る)

Sep 18, 2018 19:36
Shiru Hito zo Shiru

Today I will introduce you to the Japanese expression 'shiru hito zo shiru' (知る人ぞ知る).

Since 'shiru' (知る) means "know" and 'hito' (人) means "people" or "person," the literal meaning of this expression is "people who know it know it."

You might think that the literal meaning is natural and obvious.

However, the actual meaning of it is that everyone doesn't know it, but some informed people know it is valuable/important.

Shiru hito zo shiru is usually used as an adjective, for example, 'shiru hito zo shiru resutoran' (知る人ぞ知るレストラン - a restaurant that is known only to a few informed people).
知る人ぞ知る

今日は「知る人ぞ知る」という表現を紹介します。

「知る」は "know," 「人」は "person" や "people" を意味するので、「知る人ぞ知る」の文字通りの意味は "people who know it know it" となります。

文字通りの意味を考えると、「知る人が知っている」なんて当たり前に感じることと思います。

しかし実際には、「誰もが知っているわけではないが、一部の人にとってはその存在や価値がよく知られている」という意味を持ちます。

「知る人ぞ知る」は基本的に、「知る人ぞ知るレストラン」のように形容詞として用いられます。
No. 1 キートン's correction
That is a very interesting phrase that I'll have to remember!

This was well written! Keep up the good work Toru!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
I'm glad to hear you say that. (^^)

Nido Aru Koto wa Sando Aru (二度あることは三度ある - Things Come in Threes)

Sep 17, 2018 16:20
Nido Aru Koto wa Sando Aru

Yesterday, I introduced you to the proverb, 'sandome no shōjiki' (三度目の正直), which means that the third time is the charm.

Actually, there is another proverb, 'nido aru koto wa sando aru' (二度あることは三度ある), which has the opposite meaning of that.

'Nido' (二度) means "twice," 'aru' (ある) means "to happen," 'sando' (三度) means "three times," so the literal meaning of this proverb is that what has happened twice will happen three times.

In fact, according to Bayes' theorem, the probability that what has happened twice happens again is higher than the probability that something happens only on the third time.
二度あることは三度ある

昨日は、一度や二度失敗しても、三度目で物事がうまくいくことを意味する「三度目の正直」ということわざを紹介しました。

実はこのことわざと反対の意味を持つことわざに、「二度あることは三度ある」があります。

「二度」は "twice," 「ある」は "to happen," 「三度」は "three times" を意味するので、このことわざの意味は "What has happened twice will occur three times" となります。

実際、ベイズの定理によると、三度目で成功する確率より、二回起こったことがもう一度起こる確率のほうが高いようです。
No. 1 chibi-lang's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations! (^^)
Toru
In the last sentence, I wanted to say something like "succeed only on the third time."

Sandome no Shōjiki (三度目の正直 - The Third Time's the Charm)

Sep 16, 2018 22:52
Sandome no Shōjiki

Recently I have been looking for a new job.

Unfortunately, I failed in job interviews several times, but it seems that somehow I would pass the interview last week.

If you want to express that the first and second time would not go well, but the third time would go well like my case, you can use a Japanese proverb, 'sandome no shōjiki' (三度目の正直).

'San' (三) means "three," 'dome' (度目) means "__ times" or "__th," and 'shōjiki' means "sincerity."

However, I failed in interviews three times, and it went well in the fourth interview, so I should say 'yondome no shōjiki' (四度目の正直 - the fourth time's the charm).
三度目の正直

私はここ最近、就職活動をしていました。

残念なことに、面接で何度か続けて落とされましたが、先週受けた面接は通ったようです。

このように、一度目や二度目はあてにならなくても、三度目はうまくいくことを表すことわざに「三度目の正直」があります。

「三」は "three," 「度目」は "__ times" や "__th," 「正直」は "sincerity" を意味します。

ただし、私は面接を3回落とされ、4回目でうまくいったので、「四度目の正直」と言うべきかもしれません。
No. 1 キートン's correction
I'm glad your interview went well! I hope you enjoy your new job!

Keep up the good work! Your English is very good!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Manma to Damasareru (まんまと騙される - Being Totally Deceived)

Sep 15, 2018 08:19
Manma to Damasareru

Yesterday, I was totally deceived. This situation is expressed as 'manma to damasareta' (まんまと騙された) in Japanese.

'Damasareru' (騙される - meaning "to be deceived") is a passive voice of the verb 'damasu' (騙す - meaning "to deceive").

In addition, 'manma to' (まんまと) is an adverb that means "beautifully" or "successfully."

Previously, I introduced you to the baby word 'manma' (まんま), meaning "meal," but its etymology is different from the one of the adverb 'manma.'

It is thought that the adverb 'manma' comes from 'uma uma' (うまうま), which means "good" or "successful."
まんまと騙される

私は一昨日、まんまと騙されました。

「騙される」は「騙す」の受身形で、"to be deceived" を意味します。

「まんまと」は、「見事に」や「首尾よく」を意味する副詞です。

以前私は、食べ物を意味する幼児語の「まんま」を紹介しましたが、副詞の「まんま」とは語源が異なります。

副詞の「まんま」は、「上手な」を意味する「うま(うま)」の音が変化したものだと考えられています。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
I’m wondering what you were totally deceived about..
Toru
To tell you the truth, it was a kind of trivial matters. I referred to the traffic information on the Internet, but it was wrong and I got lost, haha.

A Logical Quiz (A is B)

Sep 14, 2018 22:18
A Logical Quiz (A is B)

Today I would like to give you a logic quiz.

[Quiz]
Fill words in A and B in the following two sentences, and make them become theoretically correct sentences.

A is B.
A is not B.


* The example answers are shown below. Please think about it before you see these answers.


[Answer 1]
A: The number of words in this sentence
B: nine

[Answer 2]
A; This sentence
B: positive

[Answer 3]
A: One of my children
B: girl

Answer 1 and 2 refer to the sentences themselves (self-reference). Answer 3 refers to a part of a group.
論理クイズ(AはBである)

今日は論理クイズを出題します。

【問題】
以下の文のAとBにそれぞれ同じ語句を入れ、どちらも正しい文にしなさい。

AはBである。
AはBではない。

※ 以下に答えを記載します。是非答えを見る前に、考えてみて下さい。

【回答例1】
A:この文章
B:12文字

【回答例2】
A:この文章
B:肯定文

【回答例3】
A:私の子どもの一人
B:女の子

回答例1と2では、自身の文章自体を参照しています(自己言及)。回答例3は、グループの中の一部を参照しています。
No. 1 tony's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. (^^)
tony
いいえ、どういたしまして。

Yarukoto Nasukoto (やることなすこと - Everything One Does)

Sep 13, 2018 09:49
Yarukoto Nasukoto

Yesterday, I used a Japanese expression, 'yarukoto nasukoto' (やることなすこと).

'Yaru' (やる) means "do," 'koto' (こと) means "thing," and 'nasu' (なす) means "do."

The literal meaning of this expression is "What someone does, what someone does."

The actual meaning of that is "All things that someone does/All of someone's attitude," and it is often used in a negative context.

For example, people say 'yarukoto nasukoto umaku ikanai' (やることなすことうまくいかない - Everything goes wrong).

On the other hand, it is sometimes used in a positive context, such as 'yarukoto nasukoto kawaii' (やることなすことかわいい - Everything she/he does is cute).
やることなすこと

私は昨日、「やることなすこと」という日本語を使いました。

「やる」は "do," 「こと」は "thing," 「なす」は "do" を意味します。

この言葉の文字通りの意味は "What someone does, what someone does" となります。

実際には、「誰かの行いや態度の全て」という意味になり、否定的な文脈で使われることが多いです。

例えば、「やることなすことうまくいかない」などです。

一方、「やることなすことかわいい」のように肯定的な意味で使われることもあります、
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Thank you!
Toru
Thank you so much for reading and correcting my post! :)

Obi ni Mijikashi Tasuki ni Nagashi (帯に短し襷に長し - Too Much for One and not Enough for One)

Sep 12, 2018 23:13
Obi ni Mijikashi Tasuki ni Nagashi

There is the Japanese proverb 'obi ni mijikasji tasuki ni nagashi,' which represents things that are lukewarm and useless.

'Obi' (帯) means "belt" used in a kimono (着物 - traditional Japanese clothes), 'mijikasi' (短し) means "short," 'tasuki' (襷) means "cord" used to tuck up the sleeves of a kimono, and 'nagashi' (長し) means "long."

This proverb refers to a fabric material.

That is to say, it means that the fabric material has a lukewarm length -- it is too short to use as obi, whereas it is too long to use as tasuki.
帯に短し襷に長し

中途半端で何の役にも立たないものを表すことわざに、「帯に短し襷に長し」があります。

「帯」は "belt," 「短し」は "short," 「襷」は "cord," 「長し」は "long" を意味します。

このことわざは、ある布生地のことを指しています。

すなわち、和服の帯としては短すぎて使えず、和服の袖をたくし上げるための襷としては長すぎて使えないという、中途半端な長さを持った布生地というわけです。
No. 1 tony's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)
tony
いいえ、どういたしまして。

Morning and Night Spiders

Sep 11, 2018 23:23
There is a superstition related to spider in Japan.

It is "If you find spiders in the morning, you should let them go even if they are hateful enemies. If you find spiders at night, you should kill them even if they are families."

In Japan, it is said that spiders in the morning are a kind of lucky items.

In fact, since spiders make a web on only sunny days, seeing a spider in the morning means that the day will be sunny.

On the other hand, this superstition says that you should kill spiders at night, but actually, you shouldn't do that.

This is because spiders are beneficial insects that eat pests such as cockroaches and flies.
朝蜘蛛と夜蜘蛛

日本には蜘蛛に関する迷信があります。

それは、「朝の蜘蛛は仇でも逃がせ、夜の蜘蛛は親でも殺せ」です。

日本では朝の蜘蛛は、縁起が良いとされてきました。

実際、蜘蛛は晴天の日にしか巣を張らないので、朝に蜘蛛を見かけると晴れることが多いです。

夜の蜘蛛は悪い印象からか、この迷信では「殺せ」と言っていますが、実際は殺すべきではありません。

蜘蛛はゴキブリやハエなどの害虫を食べてくれる益虫であるからです。
No. 1 Jecka's correction
This is a really interesting superstition. I also think spiders are worth keeping around!
Toru
Thank you very much for the corrections. :)

Kusattemo Tai (腐っても鯛 - A Good Horse Becomes Never a Jade)

Sep 10, 2018 19:19
Truly excellent things or people would not lose their original value, even if they got somewhat worse.

To express such a fact, you can use the Japanese proverb 'kusattemo tai' (腐っても鯛).

'Kusaru' (腐る) means "to rot," 'temo' (ても) means "but," and 'tai' (鯛) means "red sea bream."

Therefore, the literal meaning of kusattemo tai is "It rotted, but it's a red sea bream."

Since read sea bream has a good look and a good taste, it is treated as a lucky item in Japan.

Kusattemo tai is a kind of compliments, but using the verb kusaru (腐る - to rot) to someone is rude, so please be careful when you use it.
腐っても鯛

本当に優れたものや人は、多少悪くなったとしても、本来の価値を失わないものです。

そのようなことを表すことわざに、「腐っても鯛」があります。

「腐る」は "to rot," 「ても」は逆接の接続詞、「鯛」は "red sea bream" を意味します。

すなわち「腐っても鯛」の文字通りの意味は、"It rotted, but it's red sea bream" です。

鯛は見た目が立派で味も良く、日本では縁起物とされています。

「腐っても鯛」は誉め言葉ではありますが、「腐る」という表現を直接人に向けて言うのは失礼にあたるので、注意してください。
No. 1 katerent's correction
Wow! That’s really cool. Your writing is excellent and very natural. 勉強になりました!
katerent
Edit (update, optional):
Truly excellent things or people would not lose their original value, even if they were to become somewhat worse.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections.
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Toranu Tanuki no Kawazanyo (捕らぬ狸の皮算用 - Don't Count Your Chickens before They are Hatched)

Sep 9, 2018 16:58
Toranu Tanuki no Kawazanyo

I often do an act called "toranu tanuki no kawazanyo" (捕らぬ狸の皮算用).

'Toranu' (捕らぬ) means "not capture," 'tanuki' (狸) means "raccoon dog," 'kawa' (皮) means "skin," and 'zanyo/sanyo' (算用) means "to calculate an amount of money or something."

That is to say, the literal meaning of this phrase is that you calculate an amount of selling raccoon leather before you capture the raccoon dog.

In actuality, this phrase has the wider meaning that before you get something, you plan in line with it.
取らぬ狸の皮算用

私はよく「捕らぬ狸の皮算用」をします。

「捕らぬ」は "not capture," 「狸」は "raccoon dog," 「皮」は "skin," 「算用」は "to calculate an amount of money or something" を意味します。

すなわちこの言葉の文字通りの意味は、まだ狸を捕らえていないうちから、狸の皮を売る計算をすることです。

実際には、もう少し広い意味で、「何かを手に入れないうちから、それをあてにして計画を立てること」を表します。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

Unomi (うのみ - Trusting the Obvious)

Sep 8, 2018 20:12
Unomi

I sometimes perform an action called 'unomi' (うのみ).

'U' (う/鵜) means "cormorant," and 'nomi' (のみ/呑み) means "to swallow" or "to drink."

The combination, unomi, means to swallow something or to believe someone's story/things without ascertaining the truth or without thinking.

It is thought that this term comes from the fact that cormorants swallow whole fish without chewing it.

Unomi is often used like 'unomi ni suru' (うのみにする) with the verb 'suru' (する), which means "to do something."
うのみにする

私は時々、インターネット上にある情報をうのみにします。

「う(鵜)」は "cormorant," 「のみ」は "to swallow" もしくは "to drink" を意味します。

そして「鵜呑み」は、食べ物を噛まずに丸呑みすることや、物事の内容をよく調べたり理解せずに受け入れることを意味します。

この言葉は、鵜が口に入れた魚を噛まず丸呑みにすることからきていると考えられています。

"Do" を意味する「する」という動詞と組み合わせて、「鵜呑みにする」
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
I think we all do that sometimes... It is interesting that there is a term for it in Japanese 😊
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 outdoors's correction
Interesting image of the cormorant swallowing. In English there’s an expression “he swallowed it hook, line and sinker”. (He believed it, but it was probably a lie). We also say “she fell for it”. This kind of person may be gullible.
Toru
Thank you for letting me know the phrases! They're interesting. :)

How to Wear Trousers

Sep 7, 2018 12:43
How to Wear Trousers

I heard that most Westerners pass both their legs through trousers at the same time while sitting on a bed or something.

On the other hand, most Japanese people wear trousers from their left leg while standing on one foot.

It is said that this custom comes from the fashion of samurai.

Samurai wore hakama (袴 - culottes-like Japanese garment), but it was difficult to wear hakama due to the long hems.

Because of this, samurai came to wear hakama while standing on one foot so that they can face enemies rapidly even when they are changing the garment.
ズボンの履き方

欧米人は、ベッドなどに腰を掛け、両足を同時にズボンに通す人が多いと聞きました。

一方で日本人の多くは、片足立ちになって左足からズボンを履きます。

これは、武士の作法からきているそうです。

武士が身につけていた袴は裾が長く、履きづらいものでした。

そのため武士は、着替えの最中に敵に襲われてもすぐ対応できるよう、片足立ちで袴を履くようになったそうです。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
I think that rumor is false, at least for the US lol. We also put our pants on one leg at a time. In fact, it’s a proverb that means “everyone is the same, don’t worry.”

He/She puts their pants on one leg at a time just like everyone else. (Don’t worry they’re not gods who are perfect).
Toru
Thank you for the comment!

I frankly believed the Internet articles and books, but it was dangerous.
No. 2 エデル's correction
Nice overall -- I made suggestions on how to make this sound like more natural American-English.

よろしくお願いします。
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations! (^^)
No. 3 tony's correction
This story sounds very unlikely to me. I would guess that it was invented long after there were no longer any samurai, perhaps as a way to make little boys feel important while they learned to dress themselves.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting me!
I learned something new. :)
As you said, my information sources might have been wrong. I'd like to be more careful.

Tatami (畳 - Tatami Mat)

Sep 6, 2018 19:25
Tatami

I like a smell of 'tatami' (畳).

Tatami is a traditional Japanese flooring material in Japanese-style rooms; it is made by weaving soft rush into a settled straw.

In the past, tatami was used as a generic term for rugs or mats including thin ones.

Since rugs and mats were folded when we don't use them, the noun tatami was created by nominalizing the verb 'tatamu' (たたむ - meaning "to fold").

Unfortunately, it is said that the tatami industry is suffering from a shortage of successors.

Incidentally, when you read the kanji 畳 as 'jō' in the Chinese reading, it represents the unit for the area of a space.


私は「畳」の匂いが好きです。

畳とは、日本の和室で利用される伝統的な床材のことで、藁を縫い固めて作った芯材に、い草を編み込むことで作られます。

かつてこの言葉は、ござなども含めた敷物の総称として使われていました。

敷物は使用しないときに畳んでおくことから、動詞「たたむ」が名詞化され「たたみ」となったそうです。

残念ながら、畳業界は後継者不足の問題に苦しんでいるようです。

ちなみに、漢字「畳」を音読みで「じょう」と読むと、部屋の大きさを表す単位おなります。
No. 1 rebecaly's correction

Isogaba Maware (急がば回れ - More Haste, Less Speed)

Sep 5, 2018 14:08
Isogaba Maware

Yesterday, a Lang-8 user taught me the English phrase "Haste makes waste."

This reminded me of the similar Japanese proverb, 'isogaba maware' (急がば回れ).

'Isogu' (急ぐ) means "to hurry" or "haste," 'maware' (回れ) means "to go around."

Even if you are in a hurry, it may be dangerous or make you get lost to use an unfamiliar shortcut.

In many cases, choosing a safe and reliable way would eventually lead to better results though it might seem like a detour.

The proverb isogaba maware expresses such a fact.
急がば回れ

私は昨日、Lang-8 のユーザーから "Haste makes waste" というフレーズを教えてもらいました。

これと似た日本のことわざに、「急がば回れ」があります。

「急ぐ」は "to hurry" や "haste," 「回れ」は "to go around" を意味します。

急いでいるからと言って、慣れない近道を通ろうとすると、危険であったり道に迷ってしまうかもしれません。

多少遠回りであったとしても、安全で確実な道を行くほうが、結局は良い結果に繋がります。

急がば回れということわざは、そのようなことを表しています。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
Your English is very good.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post again! (^^)

Yudan Taiteki (油断大敵 - Don't Be Careless)

Sep 4, 2018 23:24
Yudan Taiteki

Previously, I introduced you to the word 'yudan' (油断), which means to let one's guard down or to be careless.

This word is often used in the famous four-character idiom, 'yudan taiteki' (油断大敵).

'Tai/dai' (大) means "big" or "great," and 'teki' (敵) means "enemy."

That is to say, yudan taiteki means that yudan (carelessness) is a big enemy because if you are in a state called yudan (if you are careless), you can cause a catastrophe.

This idiom can be translated into English as "Security/carelessness is the greatest enemy" or "Don't be careless."
油断大敵

以前私は、気を緩めたり注意を怠ることを意味する「油断」という言葉を紹介しました。

油断を使った有名な四字熟語に、「油断大敵」というものがあります。

「大」は "big," 「敵」は "enemy" を意味します。

すなわち「油断大敵」とは、気を緩めたり注意を怠ると大失敗を招くから、そのような「油断」は十分に気をつけるべき大きな敵であることを意味します。

英語では "Security/carelessness is the greatest enemy" や "Don't be careless" のように訳されます。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
I don’t know if we have an equivalent idiom in English, but there’s “haste makes waste” (if you hurry you’ll make mistakes).
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post and letting me know the interesting idiom!
I learned something new. :)

Fusessei (不摂生 - Intemperance)

Sep 3, 2018 17:08
Fusessei

These days I have lived a lifestyle called 'fusessei' (不摂生).

'Fu' (不) is a negative word, and 'sessei' (摂生) means to be careful of your health so as not to fall sick.

Therefore, fusessei means that you are not careful of your health or you do something harmful to your health.

If you fall sick as a result of fusessei, it can be expressed as 'fusessei ga tataru' (不摂生がたたる) by using the verb 'tataru' (たたる).

Originally, tataru means that the gods, Buddha, or ghosts bring harm, but it can also mean that something occurs a bad result.
不摂生

最近私は「不摂生」な生活を送っています。

「不」は否定を意味する語、「摂生」は病気にならないよう健康に気をつけることを意味します。

つまり「不摂生」とは、健康に気をつけないことや、健康に悪いことをすることを意味する言葉です。

不摂生の結果、実際に病気などになってしまった場合、「たたる」という動詞を使って「不摂生がたたる」のように言うことが多いです。

「たたる」は本来、神仏や怨霊などが災いをすることを意味しますが、転じて何かが原因で悪い結果が生じることも意味します。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post. :)
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
drink some airborne. it's got enough vitamin C to boost your immune system to Overdrive
Toru
Thank you for your advice! I didn't know the product. I'll try it. :)

Akuji Senri wo Hashiru (悪事千里を走る - Bad News has Wings)

Sep 2, 2018 17:17
Akuji Senri wo Hashiru

If you do bad things, the rumor will spread rapidly.

To express such a fact, you can use the proverb "akuji senri wo hashiru" (悪事千里を走る)

'Aku' (悪) means "bad" or "evil," 'ji' (事) means "thing," 'sen' (千) means "thousand," 'ri' (里) means a unit of length that represents about 4 kilometers, and 'hashiru' (走る) means "to run."

That is to say, this proverb implies that if someone does bad things, the fact or rumor will run over/spread around 4000 kilometers.
悪事千里を走る

悪いことをしたとき、その噂というものは、すぐに広まってしまうものです。

このようなことを表すことわざに、「悪事千里を走る」があります。

「悪」とは "bad" や "evil," 「事」は "thing," 「千」は "thousand," 「里」は 約4kmを表す距離の単位、「走る」は "run" を意味します。

すなわち、このことわざは、悪い行いといものは、約4000kmにわたって走る(広がる)ということを意味しているのです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

My 31st Birthday

Sep 1, 2018 14:50
My 31st Birthday

Today is my 31th birthday.

In the past several years, I have spent my birthday alone.

However, since I have someone who celebrates me this year, I'm looking forward to the small birthday party tonight.

Incidentally, the Egnlish word "birthday" is referred to as 'tanjōbi' (誕生日 - literally "birthday" or "birth date") in Japanese, whereas "birth date" is referred to as 'seinen gappi' (生年月日).

'Sei' (生) means "birth," 'nen' (年) means "year," 'ga/getsu/tsuki' (月) means "month," and 'pi/hi' (日) means "day."
31歳の誕生日

今日は、私の31歳の誕生日です。

ここ数年、誕生日は一人で過ごしていました。

しかし、今年は祝ってくれる人がいるので、今晩がとても楽しみです。

ちなみに、"birthday" は日本語で「誕生日」ですが、"birth date" は「生年月日」と言います。

「生」は "birth," 「年」は "year," 「月」は "month," 「日」は "day" を意味します。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Happy Birthday! I hope you have a great time with your special friends!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. (^^)
I could spend last night with a warm feeling.
No. 2 Oceansea's correction
お誕生日おめでとう!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
ありがとうございます! (^^)
No. 3 Fifi's correction
Oh my. So young. Happy birthday to you!
Toru
Thank you for the comment! I'm flattered. (^^)
No. 4 friendfromfaraway's correction
Happy birthday!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and comment! (^^)

Nakittsura ni Hachi (泣きっ面に蜂 - Adding Insult to Injury)

Aug 31, 2018 20:58
Nakittsura ni Hachi

Yesterday, I introduced you to the expression 'fundari kettari' (踏んだり蹴ったり), which means that one bad thing after another happens.

There is another Japanese proverb that has the similar meaning to it -- it is 'nakittsura ni hachi' (泣きっ面に蜂).

'Naki' (泣き) means "crying," 'tsura' (面) means "face," and 'hachi' (蜂) means "bee."

That is to say, nakkittsura ni hachi means that even though someone is crying already because of an unfortunate thing, a bee stings him/her.
泣きっ面に蜂

昨日は、重ねて何度もひどい目にあうことを意味する「踏んだり蹴ったり」という表現を紹介しました。

日本語には、この表現と同様の意味を持つことわざ「泣きっ面に蜂」があります。

「泣き」は "crying," 「面」は "face," 「蜂」は "bee" を意味します。

すなわち「泣きっ面に蜂」とは、不幸なできごとが起こって既に泣いているのに、さらに蜂に刺されるという不幸が起こる、ということです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post. :)

Fundari Kettari (踏んだり蹴ったり - A Streak of Bad Luck)

Aug 30, 2018 17:45
Fundari Kettari

Today was a day described as 'fundari kettari' (踏んだり蹴ったり) to me.

Fundari kettari is an expression meaning that bad things happen to someone in a row.

'Fumu' (踏む) means "to tread on something" and 'keru' (蹴る) means "to kick something."

I think that most Japanese people believe that this expression implies a misfortune of being trodden and kicked.

However, both fundari and kettari are the active voice.

The actual etymology is that treading on and kicking an undesirable thing (such as feces) is the calamity.
踏んだり蹴ったり

今日は「踏んだり蹴ったり」な一日でした。

踏んだり蹴ったりとは、重ねて何度もひどい目にあうことを意味する表現です。

「踏む」は "to tread on something," 「蹴る」は "to kick something" を意味する動詞です。

多くの日本人は、「誰かに踏まれた上に蹴られること」が災難であるため、この言葉が生まれたと勘違いしていると思います。

しかし、踏んだり蹴ったりは能動態です。

実際の語源は、踏んだり蹴ったりしたくないもの(例えば糞便)を、踏んだり蹴ったりしてしまった、ということにあるようです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

Omaru (おまる - Jerry/Potty)

Aug 29, 2018 19:58
Omaru

In Japan, we call portable indoor toilets 'omaru' (おまる).

'O' (お) is a polite prefix, and 'maru' (まる) is an archaic term that means to discharge one's urine or evacuate one's bowels.

Omaru is written as 御虎子 in kanji, and its literal meaning is "a tiger's child."

In the past, omaru was made of wood, and it had a box shape, but 'koban' (小判 - an oval gold coin) shapes have become common since the Edo period.

Since koban was sometimes called 'tora no ko' (虎の子 - literally "a tiger's child"), the kanji of omaru became 御虎子.
おまる

室内用の携帯型便器のことを、日本語で「おまる」と言います。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「まる」は用を足すことを意味する古語です。

漢字では「御虎子」と書き、文字通りの意味は「虎の子」となります。

かつておまるは木製の箱形のものが使われていましたが、江戸時代以降は小判形のものが普及しました。

当時、小判のことを「虎の子」と言っていたことから、「おまる」の漢字に「御虎子」があてられたそうです。
No. 1 Jallyy's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post. :)

Shikaesi, Fukushū, Houfuku (仕返し、復讐、報復)

Aug 28, 2018 20:26
Shikaesi, Fukushū, Houfuku

I introduced you to the Japanese term 'shippe gaeshi' (しっぺ返し - paying back) yesterday.

In addition to it, there are other terms that mean something like "revenge" -- 'shikaeshi' (仕返し), 'fukushū' (復讐) and 'houfuku' (報復).

The most common one is shikaeshi, and it is often used for petty things such as quarrels.

On the other hand, when the scale of the given harm is large, fukushū or houfuku would be used.

Houfuku contains a nuance of an acute resentment.

Fukushū can be used for not only personal matters but also groups or countries.

Additionally, shippe gaeshi is usually used for petty things as well as shikaeshi, but it has a nuance of "immediately" or "in the same way."
仕返し、復讐、報復

私は昨日、「しっぺ返し」という日本語を紹介しました。

害を与えた相手に対して何かをやり返す表現としては、他にも「仕返し」「報復」「復讐」があります。

最も日常的に使われるのは「仕返し」であり、喧嘩などの比較的些細な事柄に対して使われることが多いです。

一方で、与えられた害が大きい場合には、「復讐」「報復」という言葉が使われます。

「復讐」には強い恨みのニュアンスが含まれます。

「報復」は個人の関係だけでなく、互いが集団や国などの場合にも使われます。

また、「しっぺ返し」は「仕返し」と同じく些細な事柄に使われますが、「すぐに」や「同等の方法」のニュアンスが含まれます。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

Shippe Gaeshi (しっぺ返し - Paying Back)

Aug 27, 2018 21:27
Shippe Gaeshi

When someone does something bad to you, if you pay him/her in the same coin, the act is called 'shippe gaeshi' (しっぺ返し).

Originally, shippe gaeshi was called 'shippei gaeshi' (竹篦返し).

'Shippei' (竹篦) is a bamboo stick that is used to mentor Zen monks, and 'gaeshi/kaeshi' (返し) means "to get back."

In Zen sitting meditation, when the posture of a monk is disturbed due to distracting thoughts, the guide hits shippei on the monk's shoulder.

That is to say, shippei gaeshi means to hit back shippei. Later, shippei changed to shippe.
しっぺ返し

何かをされたとき、即座に仕返すことを「しっぺ返し」と言います。

しっぺ返しはもともと、「竹篦(しっぺい)返し」と呼ばれていました。

「竹篦」とは、師家が参禅者を指導する際に用いる竹でできた棒状の法具のことで、「返し」は "to get back" を意味します。

座禅では、雑念で姿勢が乱れた際に、戒めのためにこの竹篦を肩に打たれます。

竹篦を打たれたものが打ち返すということから、仕返しのことを「竹篦返し」と言うようになり、「しっぺ返し」になったというわけです。
No. 1 Yukinekorin's correction
Thanks for the interesting posts as always! ^^

Hmm...I've never heard of this phrase before, but I've heard of 仕返し. What's the difference between 仕返し and しっぺ返し?
Toru
Thank you for the nice question!
Both are used for petty things such as quarrels, and 仕返し is more common. As the difference, しっぺ返し has a nuance of "immediately" or "in the same way."
Yukinekorin
Sorry for the late reply. ><
I see! Thanks for sharing with me. So しっぺ返し is more like if you want to get back at them immediately, while 仕返し can be something more long term?
Toru
No need to apologize. (^^)
Yes, that's right. Compared to しっぺ返し, 仕返し can be used in various cases.
No. 2 sjstrauss's correction
How interesting! This is my first time hearing about しっぺ返し.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)
sjstrauss
You're welcome :)

Akane Gumo (茜雲 - Rosy Cloud)

Aug 26, 2018 18:22
Akane Gumo

Yesterday, I introduced you to my favorite kind of clouds, 'nyūdō gumo' (入道雲).

I also like some other types of clouds.

For example, I like 'akane gumo' (茜雲 – literally “madder clouds”), which are made by the morning sun or the setting sun.

'Akane' (茜) is a perennial and climbing plant, and its root can become a dark red dye, so this term also means such a color.

Additionally, 'gumo/kumo' (雲) means "cloud."

That is to say, akane gumo are clouds with dark red that you can see at sunrise or sunset.
茜雲

昨日は、私の好きな雲の種類である入道雲を紹介しました。

私は他にも、幾つかの好きな雲があります。

例えば、朝日や夕日によって茜色をした「茜雲」です。

「茜」はつる性の多年生植物ですが、橙色の根を染料にするとやや暗い赤色になることから、そのような色を表します。

また、「雲」は "cloud" を意味します。

すなわち茜雲とは、日の出や日の入りに見ることのできる「暗い赤色をした雲」というわけです。
No. 1 papillon's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

Nyūdō Gumo (入道雲 - Cumulonimbus Cloud)

Aug 25, 2018 21:20
Nyūdō Gumo

I like 'nyūdō gumo' (入道雲), which you can see in the summer sky.

Nyūdō gumo are huge and clear clouds like mountains that are made by rising air currents -- which are called cumulonimbus clouds in English.

'Nyūdō' (入道) is a traditional Japanese specter who has a shaven head, and 'gumo/kumo' (雲) means "cloud."

This term was made by comparing this specter with the high cumulonimbus clouds.

Incidentally, nyūdō gumo is a slang term, and its official name in Japan is 'sekiran un' (積乱雲 - literally "piled and disordered clouds").
入道雲

私は夏の空に見ることができる「入道雲」が好きです。

入道雲とは、上昇気流によって山のように立ち上がる、巨大で美しい雲のことです。

入道とは坊主頭の日本の妖怪のことで、雲は "cloud" を意味します。

雲が空高く盛り上がるようすをこの妖怪にたとえて、入道雲という言葉が生まれました。

ちなみにこの言葉は俗語であり、正式には「積乱雲」と言います。
No. 1 despotically's correction
勉強になりました!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Kami wo Suku (髪をすく - Thinning Out One's Hair)

Aug 24, 2018 11:12
I had my hair cut at a barbershop yesterday.

Whenever I go to a barbershop, in addition to the order of cut length, I always say "suite kudasai" (すいて下さい) by using the Japanese verb 'suku' (すく).

Suku originally meant to comb, fix or shove one's hair.

However, when you use this verb at barbershops or hair salons, it is usually mean to thin out one's hair or reduce the volume of one's hair.

The reason is probably that the character 'su' (す) itself has a nuance of "hollow."
髪をすく

私は昨日、美容院で散髪をしてきました。

美容院に行くと、私はいつも切る長さの注文に加えて「すく」という動詞を使って「すいて下さい」と言います。

「すく」はもともとクシなどで髪をとかしたり整えたりすることを意味していました。

しかし、美容院などでこの言葉を使った場合、髪の量を少なくするという意味になることが多いです。

これは、「す」という言葉自体に、「隙間があるもの」のニュアンスが含まれるためであると考えられます。
No. 1 Ippos's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)
No. 2 artboy598's correction
Thank you!
Toru
Thank you always for reading my post! (^^)

Fuseki (布石 - Preparation)

Aug 23, 2018 18:47
Fuseki

I introduced you to Japanese terms two days ago and three days ago.

Additionally, yesterday I introduced a coined word that is made by combining the previous two Japanese terms.

As I did, to prepare for something in advance for the future is called 'fuseki' (布石) in Japanese.

'Fu' (布) means "to arrange/deploy" and 'seki' (石) means "stone," especially here it is "Go stone."

Originally, fuseki was a term of Go, and it has meant to arrange/deploy stones in the early stage preparing for the later stage.

Connected to the above meaning, it has come to be used in various situations.
布石

私は2日前と3日前に、ある日本語を紹介しました。

そして昨日、紹介した2つの日本語を組み合わせた造語を紹介しました。

このように、将来に備えてあらかじめ準備や手配をしておくことを、「布石」と言います。

「布」は "to deploy,"「石」は "stone," 特に "go stone" を意味します。

もともと「布石」は囲碁用語であり、対局の序盤に全体の局面を見据えて石を打つことを意味していました。

この意味が広がり、現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Jallyy's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

> In the same way, I will be introducing another coined word. To prepare in advance for the future is called 'fuseki' (布石) in Japanese.
It is difficult for me to explain, but I wanted to say something like:
I introduced two terms in advance as a preparation for the yesterday's term. This preparation like I did can be called 'fuseki.'
Jallyy
あぁ、なるほど!私の違った理解にはごめんなさい。
はい、英語で説明するのは難しいですね。
これは私の新しい添削。

I introduced two terms in advance, to lay the groundwork for yesterday's term. This preparation is an example of/can be called "fuseki".
Toru
Thank you for the additional correction! (^^)

Urayamakeshikaran (うらやまけしからん)

Aug 22, 2018 12:14
Urayamakeshikaran

I introduced you to 'keshikaran' (けしからん) two days ago and 'urayamashī' (うらやましい) yesterday.

Today I would like to introduce the slang term 'urayamakeshikaran' (うらやまけしからん), which was made by combining these two terms.

As explained in previous posts, keshikaran expresses a feeling of anger to unreasonable/undesirable things, whereas urayamashī expresses a sense of longing for someone's lucky situation.

Therefore, the combination means that a situation is unreasonable, so you should against for that, but you have a longing for the situation in your heart.

Urayamakeshikaran is mainly used when seeing sexual situations or cute animals.
うらやまけしからん

一昨日は「けしからん」を、昨日は「うらやましい」を紹介しました。

今日はこれら2つの言葉を組み合わせた「うらやまけしからん」という俗語を紹介します。

既に説明したとおり、「けしからん」は道理に外れた物事に対する怒りの気持ちを、「うらやましい」は他人の恵まれた状態に憧れる気持ちを表す言葉です。

そして「うらやまけしからん」は、道理に外れていて本来諌めるべきであっても、本音では憧れの気持ちがあるときに使われます。

この言葉は、性的なシチュエーションや、かわいい動物に対して使われることが多いです。
No. 1 Valin's correction
There are pretty much no grammatical errors that I can see!

Reminds me of the English phrase "guilty pleasure" haha. It's something that you openly say you dislike but you enjoy it while no one is present.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)
And thank you for letting me know the interesting phrase! Indeed I think its nuance is similar to the one of urayamakeshikaran.
No. 2 Kyle's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and suggestion. :)
I didn't know the term "feel repulsed," but it is probably closer to what I wanted to say.

Urayamashī (うらやましい - Envious)

Aug 21, 2018 21:39
Urayamashī

When you think that someone is favored/rich and you want to become such a person, you can say 'urayamashī' (うらやましい) to express the feeling.

Urayamashī is an adjective form of the verb 'urayamu' (うらやむ).

'Ura' (うら) means inside/behind something, especially here it means "one's heart."

In addition, 'yamu' (やむ) means to be taken sick.

Originally, this term literally meant that one's mind becomes a disease by seeing someone's privileged status.

However, these days it is mainly used to express a sense of longing that you want to become such a gifted or lucky person.
うらやましい

他人が恵まれているように見えて、自分もそうなりたいという気持ちであるとき、日本語で「うらやましい」と言うことがあります。

「うらやましい」は、動詞「うらやむ」を形容詞にしたものです。

「うら」は人の目が届かない方の面を、特にここでは「心」を意味します。

また、「やむ」は病気になることを意味します。

もともとこの言葉は、文字通り他人の恵まれた状態を見て「心が病む」ことを意味していました。

しかし現在では、心が病んだり相手を妬むという意味よりも、自分もそうなりたいという気持ちを表す際によく使われます。

Keshikaran (けしからん - Unreasonable)

Aug 20, 2018 14:21
Keshikaran

When something is unreasonable and undesirable, you can express anger feelings by using the following phrase:

"Keshikaran" (けしからん).

'Keshikaru/keshikara' can be written as 異しかる or 怪しかる in kanji, and it means that something is abnormal.

Additionally, '-n' (ん) is a change in the sound of the negative auxiliary verb '-zu/nu' (ず/ぬ).

You might think that the denial of abnormal is normal.

However, the denial of abnormal here expresses that it is not just abnormal, it is terribly abnormal.

Meanwhile, these days on the Internet, this phrase is often used to mean "it is too sexy/cute."
けしからん

物事が道理に外れていて好ましくないとき、怒りの気持ちを以下の言葉で表現することがあります。

「けしからん。」

「けしかる(けしから)」は「異しかる」もしくは「怪しかる」と書き、何かが普通と違って異常であることを意味します。

そして「ん」は、打ち消しを意味する助動詞「ず/ぬ」の音が変化したものです。

「異常である」の打ち消しは、「普通である」と考えるかもしれません。

しかしここでの否定は、「単なる異常ではない。とんでもなく異常だ。」ということを表します。

一方、近年のインターネットにおいてこの言葉は「セクシーすぎる」や「可愛すぎる」という意味で使われることもあります。
No. 1 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

Ochame (お茶目 - Mischievous)

Aug 19, 2018 20:08
Ochame

There are some people around me who are called 'ochame' (お茶目).

Ochame means that someone is mischievous or innocent and lovable.

'O' (お) is a polite prefix, but there are several theories about the etymology of 'chame' (茶目).

One theory says that chame was made by combining 'cha' (茶) and 'me' (め).

'Cha' usually means "tea," but it can also mean "antic" or "cursory."

Also, 'me' usually means "eye," but it can also mean "to comport oneself as something."

Another theory said that chame comes from 'chameri' (ちゃめり), which means "antic" or "playful."
お茶目

私の周りにはよく「お茶目」と呼ばれる人がいます。

「お茶目」とは、無邪気で愛らしいさまや、子供っぽいさまを表す言葉です。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞ですが、「茶目」の語源に関しては幾つかの説があります。

1つ目の説は、「茶」と「目」が組み合わさったというものです。

「茶」は通常 "tea" を意味しますが、この字には「おどけた」や「いいかげんな」という意味もあります。

そして、「目」は「それらしく振る舞う」を意味する「めかす」から来ているというものです。

もう一つの説は、「おどける」や「ふざける」などの意味を持つ「ちゃめり」から来たというものです。

Mountain Climbing Alone

Aug 18, 2018 15:31
Mountain Climbing Alone

Today I woke up early and tried to climb Mountain Hinode alone.

Since it takes about only three hours to climb up and down the mountain, it might be closer to hiking than climbing.

However, it was really tough for me to reach the top of the mountain, because these days I have not taken exercise.

When I reached the mountain's peak, I felt awful, so I needed to rest on a bench for about 30 minutes.

After recovering from the bad feeling, I realized that there were beautiful mountains with a nice view.

This is the best part of climbing.
一人登山

今日は早起きし、一人で日の出山を登りに行きました。

往復約3時間のコースで、登山というよりはハイキングに近いです。

しかし、最近運動していなかった私にとって、山頂まで行くのはとても大変でした。

山頂についたら、吐きそうになってしまい、30分くらい座って休む必要がありした。

そして気分が落ち着いてからまわりを見渡すと、見晴らしの良い素敵な景色が広がっていました。

登山の醍醐味です。
No. 1 Kaymona's correction
That sounds like a great time with gorgeous views! ^_^
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations. :)
No. 2 David's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the helpful correction. :)

A Family Trip during Bon Day 2

Aug 17, 2018 22:59
A Family Trip during Bon Day 2

On the second day of the Nagano trip, we first went to the Chihiro Art Museum Azumino.

Chihiro IWASAKI is a famous artist painter and picture book writer in Japan, and she has affected a lot of Japanese people including my family.

In this art museum, in addition to her works, there were many picture books by various artists around the world.

After visiting there, we went to an innkeeping town called Naraijuku, which is located at an altitude of about 900 meters.

Since traditional Japanese houses and streets were kept, it was beautiful.
お盆の親族旅行2日目

長野旅行の2日目は、まず安曇野ちひろ美術館に行きました。

いわさきちひろは日本で有名な画家・絵本作家で、私の両親や私を含め、多くの日本人に影響を与えました。

この美術館には彼女の作品を中心に、世界の絵本画家の作品が展示されており、とても楽しめました。

その後は、奈良井宿という標高約900mに位置する宿場町を訪れました。

古き日本の町並みが残されており、とても美しかったです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction