Article Archive

These are my posts on Lang-8.

Shira wo Kiru (しらを切る - Playing Innocent)

Sep 19, 2018 19:49
Shira wo Kiru

Have you ever pretended you don't know something, even though you know it?

Such an action is referred to as 'shira wo kiru' (しらを切る) in Japanese.

There are two theories about the etymology of 'shira' (しら); one is that it is short for 'shiranu' (知らぬ - literally "don't know"), and the other is that it comes from 'shira' (白 - literally "white"), which means "pure" or "serious."

In addition, 'kiru' (切る) usually means "to cut," but here it means "to take a noticeable action or attitude."
しらを切る

何かを知っているのに、知らないふりをしたことはありますか?

そのような行動をとることを、日本語で「しらを切る」と言います。

「しら」は「知らぬ」の略という説と、「純粋」「真面目」を意味する「しら(白)」からきているという説があります。

「切る」は通常 "to cut" を意味しますが、ここでは「際立った行動や態度をとる」ことを意味します。
No. 1 Rick M's correction
  • Shira wo Kiru (しらを切る - Playing Innocent)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Shira wo Kiru
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Have you ever pretended you don't know something, even though you know it?
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Such an action is referred to as 'shira wo kiru' (しらを切る) in Japanese.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • There are two theories about the etymology of 'shira' (しら); one is that it is short for 'shiranu' (知らぬ - literally "don't know"), and the other is that it comes from 'shira' (白 - literally "white"), which means "pure" or "serious."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In addition, 'kiru' (切る) usually means "to cut," but here it means "to take a noticeable action or attitude."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Your entry is perfect! A very interesting look into the etymology of a common phrase!
No. 2 Chris's correction
  • Shira wo Kiru
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Have you ever pretended you don't know something, even though you know it?
  • Have you ever pretended you don't know something, even though you do?

Shiru Hito zo Shiru (知る人ぞ知る)

Sep 18, 2018 19:36
Shiru Hito zo Shiru

Today I will introduce you to the Japanese expression 'shiru hito zo shiru' (知る人ぞ知る).

Since 'shiru' (知る) means "know" and 'hito' (人) means "people" or "person," the literal meaning of this expression is "people who know it know it."

You might think that the literal meaning is natural and obvious.

However, the actual meaning of it is that everyone doesn't know it, but some informed people know it is valuable/important.

Shiru hito zo shiru is usually used as an adjective, for example, 'shiru hito zo shiru resutoran' (知る人ぞ知るレストラン - a restaurant that is known only to a few informed people).
知る人ぞ知る

今日は「知る人ぞ知る」という表現を紹介します。

「知る」は "know," 「人」は "person" や "people" を意味するので、「知る人ぞ知る」の文字通りの意味は "people who know it know it" となります。

文字通りの意味を考えると、「知る人が知っている」なんて当たり前に感じることと思います。

しかし実際には、「誰もが知っているわけではないが、一部の人にとってはその存在や価値がよく知られている」という意味を持ちます。

「知る人ぞ知る」は基本的に、「知る人ぞ知るレストラン」のように形容詞として用いられます。
No. 1 キートン's correction
  • Today I will introduce you to the Japanese expression 'shiru hito zo shiru' (知る人ぞ知る).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since 'shiru' (知る) means "know" and 'hito' (人) means "people" or "person," the literal meaning of this expression is "people who know it know it."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • You might think that the literal meaning is natural and obvious.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • However, the actual meaning of it is that everyone doesn't know it, but some informed people know it is valuable/important.
  • However, the actual meaning of it is that not everyone knows about it, but some informed people know that it is valuable/important.
  • Shiru hito zo shiru is usually used as an adjective, for example, 'shiru hito zo shiru resutoran' (知る人ぞ知るレストラン - a restaurant that is known only to a few informed people).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
That is a very interesting phrase that I'll have to remember!

This was well written! Keep up the good work Toru!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
I'm glad to hear you say that. (^^)

Nido Aru Koto wa Sando Aru (二度あることは三度ある - Things Come in Threes)

Sep 17, 2018 16:20
Nido Aru Koto wa Sando Aru

Yesterday, I introduced you to the proverb, 'sandome no shōjiki' (三度目の正直), which means that the third time is the charm.

Actually, there is another proverb, 'nido aru koto wa sando aru' (二度あることは三度ある), which has the opposite meaning of that.

'Nido' (二度) means "twice," 'aru' (ある) means "to happen," 'sando' (三度) means "three times," so the literal meaning of this proverb is that what has happened twice will happen three times.

In fact, according to Bayes' theorem, the probability that what has happened twice happens again is higher than the probability that something happens only on the third time.
二度あることは三度ある

昨日は、一度や二度失敗しても、三度目で物事がうまくいくことを意味する「三度目の正直」ということわざを紹介しました。

実はこのことわざと反対の意味を持つことわざに、「二度あることは三度ある」があります。

「二度」は "twice," 「ある」は "to happen," 「三度」は "three times" を意味するので、このことわざの意味は "What has happened twice will occur three times" となります。

実際、ベイズの定理によると、三度目で成功する確率より、二回起こったことがもう一度起こる確率のほうが高いようです。
No. 1 chibi-lang's correction
  • Nido Aru Koto wa Sando Aru (二度あることは三度ある - Things Come in Threes)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Nido Aru Koto wa Sando Aru
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Yesterday, I introduced you to the proverb, 'sandome no shōjiki' (三度目の正直), which means that the third time is the charm.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Actually, there is another proverb, 'nido aru koto wa sando aru' (二度あることは三度ある), which has the opposite meaning of that.
  • Actually, there is another proverb, 'nido aru koto wa sando aru' (二度あることは三度ある), which has the opposite meaning of that.
  • 'Nido' (二度) means "twice," 'aru' (ある) means "to happen," 'sando' (三度) means "three times," so the literal meaning of this proverb is that what has happened twice will happen three times.
  • 'Nido' (二度) means "twice," 'aru' (ある) means "to happen," 'sando' (三度) means "three times," so the literal meaning of this proverb is that what has happened twice will happen three times.
     Or "...what has happened twice will happen once more."
  • In fact, according to Bayes' theorem, the probability that what has happened twice happens again is higher than the probability that something happens only on the third time.
  • In fact, according to Bayes' theorem, the probability that what has happened twice happens again is higher than the probability that something happens only on the third time.
     The English is correct but doesn't make sense. It can't "happen only on the third time." That implies there were two times before that, or it would be the first time.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations! (^^)
Toru
In the last sentence, I wanted to say something like "succeed only on the third time."

Sandome no Shōjiki (三度目の正直 - The Third Time's the Charm)

Sep 16, 2018 22:52
Sandome no Shōjiki

Recently I have been looking for a new job.

Unfortunately, I failed in job interviews several times, but it seems that somehow I would pass the interview last week.

If you want to express that the first and second time would not go well, but the third time would go well like my case, you can use a Japanese proverb, 'sandome no shōjiki' (三度目の正直).

'San' (三) means "three," 'dome' (度目) means "__ times" or "__th," and 'shōjiki' means "sincerity."

However, I failed in interviews three times, and it went well in the fourth interview, so I should say 'yondome no shōjiki' (四度目の正直 - the fourth time's the charm).
三度目の正直

私はここ最近、就職活動をしていました。

残念なことに、面接で何度か続けて落とされましたが、先週受けた面接は通ったようです。

このように、一度目や二度目はあてにならなくても、三度目はうまくいくことを表すことわざに「三度目の正直」があります。

「三」は "three," 「度目」は "__ times" や "__th," 「正直」は "sincerity" を意味します。

ただし、私は面接を3回落とされ、4回目でうまくいったので、「四度目の正直」と言うべきかもしれません。
No. 1 キートン's correction
  • Recently I have been looking for a new job.
  • Recently, I have been looking for a new job.
  • Unfortunately, I failed in job interviews several times, but it seems that somehow I would pass the interview last week.
  • Unfortunately, I failed in job interviews several times, but it seems that somehow I passed the interview last week.
     Usually, we don't talk about "passing" and "failing" interviews for jobs in this way. It is more common to say things like "my interview went well" or "I did not get the job".

    "Unfortunately, my first few interviews did not go so well, but I must have done well in my interview last week because I got the job."

    If you wanted to use terminology like "pass" and "fail", you could say something like this:

    "Unfortunately, I failed my first few interviews, but I succeeded in my interview last week."
  • If you want to express that the first and second time would not go well, but the third time would go well like my case, you can use a Japanese proverb, 'sandome no shōjiki' (三度目の正直).
  • If you want to express that the first and second time did not go well, but the third time went well like my case, you can use the Japanese proverb, 'sandome no shōjiki' (三度目の正直).
  • 'San' (三) means "three," 'dome' (度目) means "__ times" or "__th," and 'shōjiki' means "sincerity."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • However, I failed in interviews three times, and it went well in the fourth interview, so I should say 'yondome no shōjiki' (四度目の正直 - the fourth time's the charm).
  • However, because I failed three interviews before it went well in the fourth interview, so I should say 'yondome no shōjiki' (四度目の正直 - the fourth time's the charm).
I'm glad your interview went well! I hope you enjoy your new job!

Keep up the good work! Your English is very good!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Manma to Damasareru (まんまと騙される - Being Totally Deceived)

Sep 15, 2018 08:19
Manma to Damasareru

Yesterday, I was totally deceived. This situation is expressed as 'manma to damasareta' (まんまと騙された) in Japanese.

'Damasareru' (騙される - meaning "to be deceived") is a passive voice of the verb 'damasu' (騙す - meaning "to deceive").

In addition, 'manma to' (まんまと) is an adverb that means "beautifully" or "successfully."

Previously, I introduced you to the baby word 'manma' (まんま), meaning "meal," but its etymology is different from the one of the adverb 'manma.'

It is thought that the adverb 'manma' comes from 'uma uma' (うまうま), which means "good" or "successful."
まんまと騙される

私は一昨日、まんまと騙されました。

「騙される」は「騙す」の受身形で、"to be deceived" を意味します。

「まんまと」は、「見事に」や「首尾よく」を意味する副詞です。

以前私は、食べ物を意味する幼児語の「まんま」を紹介しましたが、副詞の「まんま」とは語源が異なります。

副詞の「まんま」は、「上手な」を意味する「うま(うま)」の音が変化したものだと考えられています。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
I’m wondering what you were totally deceived about..
Toru
To tell you the truth, it was a kind of trivial matters. I referred to the traffic information on the Internet, but it was wrong and I got lost, haha.

A Logical Quiz (A is B)

Sep 14, 2018 22:18
A Logical Quiz (A is B)

Today I would like to give you a logic quiz.

[Quiz]
Fill words in A and B in the following two sentences, and make them become theoretically correct sentences.

A is B.
A is not B.


* The example answers are shown below. Please think about it before you see these answers.


[Answer 1]
A: The number of words in this sentence
B: nine

[Answer 2]
A; This sentence
B: positive

[Answer 3]
A: One of my children
B: girl

Answer 1 and 2 refer to the sentences themselves (self-reference). Answer 3 refers to a part of a group.
論理クイズ(AはBである)

今日は論理クイズを出題します。

【問題】
以下の文のAとBにそれぞれ同じ語句を入れ、どちらも正しい文にしなさい。

AはBである。
AはBではない。

※ 以下に答えを記載します。是非答えを見る前に、考えてみて下さい。

【回答例1】
A:この文章
B:12文字

【回答例2】
A:この文章
B:肯定文

【回答例3】
A:私の子どもの一人
B:女の子

回答例1と2では、自身の文章自体を参照しています(自己言及)。回答例3は、グループの中の一部を参照しています。
No. 1 tony's correction
  • B: positive
  • B: affirmative
  • B: girl
  • B: a girl [Alternative: female]
  • Answer 3 refers to a part of a group.
  • Answer 3 refers to a member of a group.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. (^^)
tony
いいえ、どういたしまして。

Yarukoto Nasukoto (やることなすこと - Everything One Does)

Sep 13, 2018 09:49
Yarukoto Nasukoto

Yesterday, I used a Japanese expression, 'yarukoto nasukoto' (やることなすこと).

'Yaru' (やる) means "do," 'koto' (こと) means "thing," and 'nasu' (なす) means "do."

The literal meaning of this expression is "What someone does, what someone does."

The actual meaning of that is "All things that someone does/All of someone's attitude," and it is often used in a negative context.

For example, people say 'yarukoto nasukoto umaku ikanai' (やることなすことうまくいかない - Everything goes wrong).

On the other hand, it is sometimes used in a positive context, such as 'yarukoto nasukoto kawaii' (やることなすことかわいい - Everything she/he does is cute).
やることなすこと

私は昨日、「やることなすこと」という日本語を使いました。

「やる」は "do," 「こと」は "thing," 「なす」は "do" を意味します。

この言葉の文字通りの意味は "What someone does, what someone does" となります。

実際には、「誰かの行いや態度の全て」という意味になり、否定的な文脈で使われることが多いです。

例えば、「やることなすことうまくいかない」などです。

一方、「やることなすことかわいい」のように肯定的な意味で使われることもあります、
No. 1 artboy598's correction
  • The actual meaning of that is "All things that someone does/All of someone's attitude," and it is often used in a negative context.
  • The actual meaning of that is "All things that someone does/All of someone's attitude," and it is often used in a negative context.
Thank you!
Toru
Thank you so much for reading and correcting my post! :)

Obi ni Mijikashi Tasuki ni Nagashi (帯に短し襷に長し - Too Much for One and not Enough for One)

Sep 12, 2018 23:13
Obi ni Mijikashi Tasuki ni Nagashi

There is the Japanese proverb 'obi ni mijikasji tasuki ni nagashi,' which represents things that are lukewarm and useless.

'Obi' (帯) means "belt" used in a kimono (着物 - traditional Japanese clothes), 'mijikasi' (短し) means "short," 'tasuki' (襷) means "cord" used to tuck up the sleeves of a kimono, and 'nagashi' (長し) means "long."

This proverb refers to a fabric material.

That is to say, it means that the fabric material has a lukewarm length -- it is too short to use as obi, whereas it is too long to use as tasuki.
帯に短し襷に長し

中途半端で何の役にも立たないものを表すことわざに、「帯に短し襷に長し」があります。

「帯」は "belt," 「短し」は "short," 「襷」は "cord," 「長し」は "long" を意味します。

このことわざは、ある布生地のことを指しています。

すなわち、和服の帯としては短すぎて使えず、和服の袖をたくし上げるための襷としては長すぎて使えないという、中途半端な長さを持った布生地というわけです。
No. 1 tony's correction
  • Obi ni Mijikashi Tasuki ni Nagashi (帯に短し襷に長し - Too Much for One and not Enough for One)
  • Obi ni Mijikashi Tasuki ni Nagashi (帯に短し襷に長し - Neither One Thing Nor The Other)
     "Neither one thing nor the other" is not a literal translation, but "too much for one and not enough for one" doesn't make any sense, and is also not a literal translation.
  • There is the Japanese proverb 'obi ni mijikasji tasuki ni nagashi,' which represents things that are lukewarm and useless.
  • There is a Japanese proverb, 'obi ni mijikasji tasuki ni nagashi,' which means that something is lukewarm and useless.
  • 'Obi' (帯) means "belt" used in a kimono (着物 - traditional Japanese clothes), 'mijikasi' (短し) means "short," 'tasuki' (襷) means "cord" used to tuck up the sleeves of a kimono, and 'nagashi' (長し) means "long."
  • 'Obi' (帯) means a/the "belt" used in a kimono (着物 - traditional Japanese clothes), 'mijikasi' (短し) means "short," 'tasuki' (襷) means a/the "cord" used to tuck up the sleeves of a kimono, and 'nagashi' (長し) means "long."
  • This proverb refers to a fabric material.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • That is to say, it means that the fabric material has a lukewarm length -- it is too short to use as obi, whereas it is too long to use as tasuki.
  • That is to say, it means that the fabric material has a lukewarm length -- it is too short to use as obi, whereas it is too long to use as tasuki.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)
tony
いいえ、どういたしまして。

Morning and Night Spiders

Sep 11, 2018 23:23
There is a superstition related to spider in Japan.

It is "If you find spiders in the morning, you should let them go even if they are hateful enemies. If you find spiders at night, you should kill them even if they are families."

In Japan, it is said that spiders in the morning are a kind of lucky items.

In fact, since spiders make a web on only sunny days, seeing a spider in the morning means that the day will be sunny.

On the other hand, this superstition says that you should kill spiders at night, but actually, you shouldn't do that.

This is because spiders are beneficial insects that eat pests such as cockroaches and flies.
朝蜘蛛と夜蜘蛛

日本には蜘蛛に関する迷信があります。

それは、「朝の蜘蛛は仇でも逃がせ、夜の蜘蛛は親でも殺せ」です。

日本では朝の蜘蛛は、縁起が良いとされてきました。

実際、蜘蛛は晴天の日にしか巣を張らないので、朝に蜘蛛を見かけると晴れることが多いです。

夜の蜘蛛は悪い印象からか、この迷信では「殺せ」と言っていますが、実際は殺すべきではありません。

蜘蛛はゴキブリやハエなどの害虫を食べてくれる益虫であるからです。
No. 1 Jecka's correction
  • There is a superstition related to spider in Japan.
  • There is a superstition related to spiders in Japan.
  • It is "If you find spiders in the morning, you should let them go even if they are hateful enemies.
  • It goeis "If you find spiders in the morning, you should let them go even if they are your hateful enemies.
     "Is" isn't wrong but "goes" is more natural
  • If you find spiders at night, you should kill them even if they are families."
  • If you find spiders at night, you should kill them even if they are familiesy."
  • In Japan, it is said that spiders in the morning are a kind of lucky items.
  • In Japan, it is said that seeing spiders in the morning isare a kind of lucky signtems.
  • In fact, since spiders make a web on only sunny days, seeing a spider in the morning means that the day will be sunny.
  • In fact, since spiders only make a webs on only sunny days, seeing a spider in the morning means that the day will be sunny.
This is a really interesting superstition. I also think spiders are worth keeping around!
Toru
Thank you very much for the corrections. :)

Kusattemo Tai (腐っても鯛 - A Good Horse Becomes Never a Jade)

Sep 10, 2018 19:19
Truly excellent things or people would not lose their original value, even if they got somewhat worse.

To express such a fact, you can use the Japanese proverb 'kusattemo tai' (腐っても鯛).

'Kusaru' (腐る) means "to rot," 'temo' (ても) means "but," and 'tai' (鯛) means "red sea bream."

Therefore, the literal meaning of kusattemo tai is "It rotted, but it's a red sea bream."

Since read sea bream has a good look and a good taste, it is treated as a lucky item in Japan.

Kusattemo tai is a kind of compliments, but using the verb kusaru (腐る - to rot) to someone is rude, so please be careful when you use it.
腐っても鯛

本当に優れたものや人は、多少悪くなったとしても、本来の価値を失わないものです。

そのようなことを表すことわざに、「腐っても鯛」があります。

「腐る」は "to rot," 「ても」は逆接の接続詞、「鯛」は "red sea bream" を意味します。

すなわち「腐っても鯛」の文字通りの意味は、"It rotted, but it's red sea bream" です。

鯛は見た目が立派で味も良く、日本では縁起物とされています。

「腐っても鯛」は誉め言葉ではありますが、「腐る」という表現を直接人に向けて言うのは失礼にあたるので、注意してください。
No. 1 katerent's correction
  • Truly excellent things or people would not lose their original value, even if they got somewhat worse.
  • Truly excellent things or people would not lose their original value, even if they becamegot somewhat worse.
  • To express such a fact, you can use the Japanese proverb 'kusattemo tai' (腐っても鯛).
  • To express such a fact, you can use the Japanese proverb 'kusattemo tai' (腐っても鯛).
  • 'Kusaru' (腐る) means "to rot," 'temo' (ても) means "but," and 'tai' (鯛) means "red sea bream."
  • 'Kusaru' (腐る) means "to rot," 'temo' (ても) means "but," and 'tai' (鯛) means "red sea bream."
  • Therefore, the literal meaning of kusattemo tai is "It rotted, but it's a red sea bream."
  • Therefore, the literal meaning of kusattemo tai is "It rotted, but it's a red sea bream."
     Or “Even if it rots, it’s (still) a red sea bream”
  • Since read sea bream has a good look and a good taste, it is treated as a lucky item in Japan.
  • Since read sea bream ihas knowna fgorod its splendidook appearanced and greatood taste, it is treated as a lucky syitembol in Japan.
  • Kusattemo tai is a kind of compliments, but using the verb kusaru (腐る - to rot) to someone is rude, so please be careful when you use it.
  • Kusattemo tai is a kind of compliments, but using the verb kusaru (腐る - to rot) when speaking to someone directly may sound rude, so please be careful when you use it.
Wow! That’s really cool. Your writing is excellent and very natural. 勉強になりました!
katerent
Edit (update, optional):
Truly excellent things or people would not lose their original value, even if they were to become somewhat worse.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections.
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Toranu Tanuki no Kawazanyo (捕らぬ狸の皮算用 - Don't Count Your Chickens before They are Hatched)

Sep 9, 2018 16:58
Toranu Tanuki no Kawazanyo

I often do an act called "toranu tanuki no kawazanyo" (捕らぬ狸の皮算用).

'Toranu' (捕らぬ) means "not capture," 'tanuki' (狸) means "raccoon dog," 'kawa' (皮) means "skin," and 'zanyo/sanyo' (算用) means "to calculate an amount of money or something."

That is to say, the literal meaning of this phrase is that you calculate an amount of selling raccoon leather before you capture the raccoon dog.

In actuality, this phrase has the wider meaning that before you get something, you plan in line with it.
取らぬ狸の皮算用

私はよく「捕らぬ狸の皮算用」をします。

「捕らぬ」は "not capture," 「狸」は "raccoon dog," 「皮」は "skin," 「算用」は "to calculate an amount of money or something" を意味します。

すなわちこの言葉の文字通りの意味は、まだ狸を捕らえていないうちから、狸の皮を売る計算をすることです。

実際には、もう少し広い意味で、「何かを手に入れないうちから、それをあてにして計画を立てること」を表します。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
  • Toranu Tanuki no Kawazanyo (捕らぬ狸の皮算用 - Don't Count Your Chickens before They are Hatched)
  • Toranu Tanuki no Kawazanyo (捕らぬ狸の皮算用 - Don't Count Your Chickens before They are Hatched)
  • That is to say, the literal meaning of this phrase is that you calculate an amount of selling raccoon leather before you capture the raccoon dog.
  • That is to say, the literal meaning of this phrase is that you calculate the amount of money you'd make selling raccoon leather dog skins before you capture the raccoon dog.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

Unomi (うのみ - Trusting the Obvious)

Sep 8, 2018 20:12
Unomi

I sometimes perform an action called 'unomi' (うのみ).

'U' (う/鵜) means "cormorant," and 'nomi' (のみ/呑み) means "to swallow" or "to drink."

The combination, unomi, means to swallow something or to believe someone's story/things without ascertaining the truth or without thinking.

It is thought that this term comes from the fact that cormorants swallow whole fish without chewing it.

Unomi is often used like 'unomi ni suru' (うのみにする) with the verb 'suru' (する), which means "to do something."
うのみにする

私は時々、インターネット上にある情報をうのみにします。

「う(鵜)」は "cormorant," 「のみ」は "to swallow" もしくは "to drink" を意味します。

そして「鵜呑み」は、食べ物を噛まずに丸呑みすることや、物事の内容をよく調べたり理解せずに受け入れることを意味します。

この言葉は、鵜が口に入れた魚を噛まず丸呑みにすることからきていると考えられています。

"Do" を意味する「する」という動詞と組み合わせて、「鵜呑みにする」
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
  • Unomi (うのみ - Trusting the Obvious)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Unomi
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I sometimes perform an action called 'unomi' (うのみ).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'U' (う/鵜) means "cormorant," and 'nomi' (のみ/呑み) means "to swallow" or "to drink."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The combination, unomi, means to swallow something or to believe someone's story/things without ascertaining the truth or without thinking.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • It is thought that this term comes from the fact that cormorants swallow whole fish without chewing it.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Unomi is often used like 'unomi ni suru' (うのみにする) with the verb 'suru' (する), which means "to do something."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
I think we all do that sometimes... It is interesting that there is a term for it in Japanese 😊
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 outdoors's correction
Interesting image of the cormorant swallowing. In English there’s an expression “he swallowed it hook, line and sinker”. (He believed it, but it was probably a lie). We also say “she fell for it”. This kind of person may be gullible.
Toru
Thank you for letting me know the phrases! They're interesting. :)

How to Wear Trousers

Sep 7, 2018 12:43
How to Wear Trousers

I heard that most Westerners pass both their legs through trousers at the same time while sitting on a bed or something.

On the other hand, most Japanese people wear trousers from their left leg while standing on one foot.

It is said that this custom comes from the fashion of samurai.

Samurai wore hakama (袴 - culottes-like Japanese garment), but it was difficult to wear hakama due to the long hems.

Because of this, samurai came to wear hakama while standing on one foot so that they can face enemies rapidly even when they are changing the garment.
ズボンの履き方

欧米人は、ベッドなどに腰を掛け、両足を同時にズボンに通す人が多いと聞きました。

一方で日本人の多くは、片足立ちになって左足からズボンを履きます。

これは、武士の作法からきているそうです。

武士が身につけていた袴は裾が長く、履きづらいものでした。

そのため武士は、着替えの最中に敵に襲われてもすぐ対応できるよう、片足立ちで袴を履くようになったそうです。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
I think that rumor is false, at least for the US lol. We also put our pants on one leg at a time. In fact, it’s a proverb that means “everyone is the same, don’t worry.”

He/She puts their pants on one leg at a time just like everyone else. (Don’t worry they’re not gods who are perfect).
Toru
Thank you for the comment!

I frankly believed the Internet articles and books, but it was dangerous.
No. 2 エデル's correction
  • How to Wear Trousers
  • How Different Cultures Put Pants On
  • I heard that most Westerners pass both their legs through trousers at the same time while sitting on a bed or something.
  • I heard that most Westerners pull pants onto both legs at the same time while sitting on a bed or something else.
  • On the other hand, most Japanese people wear trousers from their left leg while standing on one foot.
  • By comparison, most Japanese people pull pants on from one leg while standing on the other one.
  • It is said that this custom comes from the fashion of samurai.
  • Rumor has it that this custom comes from the time of the samurai.
  • Samurai wore hakama (袴 - culottes-like Japanese garment), but it was difficult to wear hakama due to the long hems.
  • Samurai wore a special kind of pants called hakama (袴 - somewhat like baggy pants that were tight around the ankle or knee), but it was difficult to put on hakama due to the long hems.
     Hardly any English speakers will know the word "culottes"
  • Because of this, samurai came to wear hakama while standing on one foot so that they can face enemies rapidly even when they are changing the garment.
  • Because of this, samurai started putting on hakama while standing on one foot so that they could quickly face any assassins or enemies, even when they were getting their pants on.
     This last part may seem like somewhat of a stretch -- as most people would not expect the samurai to be attacked suddenly in the night. It might make sense to write a sentence about this prior to this one, so people are more likely to believe the threat was real.
Nice overall -- I made suggestions on how to make this sound like more natural American-English.

よろしくお願いします。
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations! (^^)
No. 3 tony's correction
  • How to Wear Trousers
  • How to put on trousers
     To "put on" an item of clothing is to go from the state of not having it on one's body to the state of having it on one's body.
    To "wear" an item of clothing is to continue to have it on one's body after one has already put it on.
    The Japanese verbs having to do with this, such as 履く、着る and 被る can all be used for both meanings, but in English, "put on" and "wear" cannot be substituted for each other; they describe different actions.
  • I heard that most Westerners pass both their legs through trousers at the same time while sitting on a bed or something.
  • I heard that most Westerners pass both their legs through trousers at the same time while sitting on a bed or something.
     I doubt that this is true.
  • On the other hand, most Japanese people wear trousers from their left leg while standing on one foot.
  • On the other hand, most Japanese people put trousers on their left leg first, while standing on one foot.
  • It is said that this custom comes from the fashion of samurai.
  • It is said that this custom comes from the customs/practices of samurai.
  • Samurai wore hakama (袴 - culottes-like Japanese garment), but it was difficult to wear hakama due to the long hems.
  • Samurai wore hakama (袴 - culottes-like Japanese garment), but it was difficult to put on hakama due to the long hems.
  • Because of this, samurai came to wear hakama while standing on one foot so that they can face enemies rapidly even when they are changing the garment.
  • Because of this, samurai came to put on hakama while standing on one foot so that they could face enemies rapidly even when they are changing their clothes/garments.
This story sounds very unlikely to me. I would guess that it was invented long after there were no longer any samurai, perhaps as a way to make little boys feel important while they learned to dress themselves.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting me!
I learned something new. :)
As you said, my information sources might have been wrong. I'd like to be more careful.

Tatami (畳 - Tatami Mat)

Sep 6, 2018 19:25
Tatami

I like a smell of 'tatami' (畳).

Tatami is a traditional Japanese flooring material in Japanese-style rooms; it is made by weaving soft rush into a settled straw.

In the past, tatami was used as a generic term for rugs or mats including thin ones.

Since rugs and mats were folded when we don't use them, the noun tatami was created by nominalizing the verb 'tatamu' (たたむ - meaning "to fold").

Unfortunately, it is said that the tatami industry is suffering from a shortage of successors.

Incidentally, when you read the kanji 畳 as 'jō' in the Chinese reading, it represents the unit for the area of a space.


私は「畳」の匂いが好きです。

畳とは、日本の和室で利用される伝統的な床材のことで、藁を縫い固めて作った芯材に、い草を編み込むことで作られます。

かつてこの言葉は、ござなども含めた敷物の総称として使われていました。

敷物は使用しないときに畳んでおくことから、動詞「たたむ」が名詞化され「たたみ」となったそうです。

残念ながら、畳業界は後継者不足の問題に苦しんでいるようです。

ちなみに、漢字「畳」を音読みで「じょう」と読むと、部屋の大きさを表す単位おなります。
No. 1 rebecaly's correction
  • Tatami is a traditional Japanese flooring material in Japanese-style rooms; it is made by weaving soft rush into a settled straw.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In the past, tatami was used as a generic term for rugs or mats including thin ones.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since rugs and mats were folded when we don't use them, the noun tatami was created by nominalizing the verb 'tatamu' (たたむ - meaning "to fold").
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Unfortunately, it is said that the tatami industry is suffering from a shortage of successors.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Incidentally, when you read the kanji 畳 as 'jō' in the Chinese reading, it represents the unit for the area of a space.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!

Isogaba Maware (急がば回れ - More Haste, Less Speed)

Sep 5, 2018 14:08
Isogaba Maware

Yesterday, a Lang-8 user taught me the English phrase "Haste makes waste."

This reminded me of the similar Japanese proverb, 'isogaba maware' (急がば回れ).

'Isogu' (急ぐ) means "to hurry" or "haste," 'maware' (回れ) means "to go around."

Even if you are in a hurry, it may be dangerous or make you get lost to use an unfamiliar shortcut.

In many cases, choosing a safe and reliable way would eventually lead to better results though it might seem like a detour.

The proverb isogaba maware expresses such a fact.
急がば回れ

私は昨日、Lang-8 のユーザーから "Haste makes waste" というフレーズを教えてもらいました。

これと似た日本のことわざに、「急がば回れ」があります。

「急ぐ」は "to hurry" や "haste," 「回れ」は "to go around" を意味します。

急いでいるからと言って、慣れない近道を通ろうとすると、危険であったり道に迷ってしまうかもしれません。

多少遠回りであったとしても、安全で確実な道を行くほうが、結局は良い結果に繋がります。

急がば回れということわざは、そのようなことを表しています。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
  • Even if you are in a hurry, it may be dangerous or make you get lost to use an unfamiliar shortcut.
  • Even if you are in a hurry, using an unfamiliar shortcut may be dangerous or cmauske you to get lost. to use an unfamiliar shortcut.
     The way I corrected it is just one of many options. Changing the order of the sentence seems to make it more understandable.
Your English is very good.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post again! (^^)

Yudan Taiteki (油断大敵 - Don't Be Careless)

Sep 4, 2018 23:24
Yudan Taiteki

Previously, I introduced you to the word 'yudan' (油断), which means to let one's guard down or to be careless.

This word is often used in the famous four-character idiom, 'yudan taiteki' (油断大敵).

'Tai/dai' (大) means "big" or "great," and 'teki' (敵) means "enemy."

That is to say, yudan taiteki means that yudan (carelessness) is a big enemy because if you are in a state called yudan (if you are careless), you can cause a catastrophe.

This idiom can be translated into English as "Security/carelessness is the greatest enemy" or "Don't be careless."
油断大敵

以前私は、気を緩めたり注意を怠ることを意味する「油断」という言葉を紹介しました。

油断を使った有名な四字熟語に、「油断大敵」というものがあります。

「大」は "big," 「敵」は "enemy" を意味します。

すなわち「油断大敵」とは、気を緩めたり注意を怠ると大失敗を招くから、そのような「油断」は十分に気をつけるべき大きな敵であることを意味します。

英語では "Security/carelessness is the greatest enemy" や "Don't be careless" のように訳されます。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
  • Previously, I introduced you to the word 'yudan' (油断), which means to let one's guard down or to be careless.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • This word is often used in the famous four-character idiom, 'yudan taiteki' (油断大敵).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Tai/dai' (大) means "big" or "great," and 'teki' (敵) means "enemy."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • That is to say, yudan taiteki means that yudan (carelessness) is a big enemy because if you are in a state called yudan (if you are careless), you can cause a catastrophe.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • This idiom can be translated into English as "Security/carelessness is the greatest enemy" or "Don't be careless."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
I don’t know if we have an equivalent idiom in English, but there’s “haste makes waste” (if you hurry you’ll make mistakes).
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post and letting me know the interesting idiom!
I learned something new. :)

Fusessei (不摂生 - Intemperance)

Sep 3, 2018 17:08
Fusessei

These days I have lived a lifestyle called 'fusessei' (不摂生).

'Fu' (不) is a negative word, and 'sessei' (摂生) means to be careful of your health so as not to fall sick.

Therefore, fusessei means that you are not careful of your health or you do something harmful to your health.

If you fall sick as a result of fusessei, it can be expressed as 'fusessei ga tataru' (不摂生がたたる) by using the verb 'tataru' (たたる).

Originally, tataru means that the gods, Buddha, or ghosts bring harm, but it can also mean that something occurs a bad result.
不摂生

最近私は「不摂生」な生活を送っています。

「不」は否定を意味する語、「摂生」は病気にならないよう健康に気をつけることを意味します。

つまり「不摂生」とは、健康に気をつけないことや、健康に悪いことをすることを意味する言葉です。

不摂生の結果、実際に病気などになってしまった場合、「たたる」という動詞を使って「不摂生がたたる」のように言うことが多いです。

「たたる」は本来、神仏や怨霊などが災いをすることを意味しますが、転じて何かが原因で悪い結果が生じることも意味します。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
  • These days I have lived a lifestyle called 'fusessei' (不摂生).
  • These days I have been living a lifestyle called 'fusessei' (不摂生).
  • 'Fu' (不) is a negative word, and 'sessei' (摂生) means to be careful of your health so as not to fall sick.
  • 'Fu' (不) is a negative word, and 'sessei' (摂生) means to be careful of your health so as not to get sick.
  • Therefore, fusessei means that you are not careful of your health or you do something harmful to your health.
  • Therefore, fusessei means that you are not being careful about your health or that you are doing something harmful to your health.
  • If you fall sick as a result of fusessei, it can be expressed as 'fusessei ga tataru' (不摂生がたたる) by using the verb 'tataru' (たたる).
  • If you get sick as a result of fusessei, it can be expressed as 'fusessei ga tataru' (不摂生がたたる) by using the verb 'tataru' (たたる).
  • Originally, tataru means that the gods, Buddha, or ghosts bring harm, but it can also mean that something occurs a bad result.
  • Originally, tataru means that the gods, Buddha, or ghosts bring harm, but it can also mean that something ends badly.
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post. :)
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
drink some airborne. it's got enough vitamin C to boost your immune system to Overdrive
Toru
Thank you for your advice! I didn't know the product. I'll try it. :)

Akuji Senri wo Hashiru (悪事千里を走る - Bad News has Wings)

Sep 2, 2018 17:17
Akuji Senri wo Hashiru

If you do bad things, the rumor will spread rapidly.

To express such a fact, you can use the proverb "akuji senri wo hashiru" (悪事千里を走る)

'Aku' (悪) means "bad" or "evil," 'ji' (事) means "thing," 'sen' (千) means "thousand," 'ri' (里) means a unit of length that represents about 4 kilometers, and 'hashiru' (走る) means "to run."

That is to say, this proverb implies that if someone does bad things, the fact or rumor will run over/spread around 4000 kilometers.
悪事千里を走る

悪いことをしたとき、その噂というものは、すぐに広まってしまうものです。

このようなことを表すことわざに、「悪事千里を走る」があります。

「悪」とは "bad" や "evil," 「事」は "thing," 「千」は "thousand," 「里」は 約4kmを表す距離の単位、「走る」は "run" を意味します。

すなわち、このことわざは、悪い行いといものは、約4000kmにわたって走る(広がる)ということを意味しているのです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
  • If you do bad things, the rumor will spread rapidly.
  • If you do bad things, everyone around you will know soon enough.
  • To express such a fact, you can use the proverb "akuji senri wo hashiru" (悪事千里を走る)
  • To describe this situation, you can use the proverb "akuji senri wo hashiru" (悪事千里を走る)
  • 'Aku' (悪) means "bad" or "evil," 'ji' (事) means "thing," 'sen' (千) means "thousand," 'ri' (里) means a unit of length that represents about 4 kilometers, and 'hashiru' (走る) means "to run."
  • 'Aku' (悪) means "bad" or "evil," 'ji' (事) means "thing," 'sen' (千) means "thousand," 'ri' (里) means a unit of length of about 4 kilometers, and 'hashiru' (走る) means "to run."
  • That is to say, this proverb implies that if someone does bad things, the fact or rumor will run over/spread around 4000 kilometers.
  • That is to say This proverb implies that if someone does bad things, news about this will run over/spread over 4000 kilometers.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

My 31st Birthday

Sep 1, 2018 14:50
My 31st Birthday

Today is my 31th birthday.

In the past several years, I have spent my birthday alone.

However, since I have someone who celebrates me this year, I'm looking forward to the small birthday party tonight.

Incidentally, the Egnlish word "birthday" is referred to as 'tanjōbi' (誕生日 - literally "birthday" or "birth date") in Japanese, whereas "birth date" is referred to as 'seinen gappi' (生年月日).

'Sei' (生) means "birth," 'nen' (年) means "year," 'ga/getsu/tsuki' (月) means "month," and 'pi/hi' (日) means "day."
31歳の誕生日

今日は、私の31歳の誕生日です。

ここ数年、誕生日は一人で過ごしていました。

しかし、今年は祝ってくれる人がいるので、今晩がとても楽しみです。

ちなみに、"birthday" は日本語で「誕生日」ですが、"birth date" は「生年月日」と言います。

「生」は "birth," 「年」は "year," 「月」は "month," 「日」は "day" を意味します。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
  • My 31st Birthday
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • My 31st Birthday
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Today is my 31th birthday.
  • Today is my 31st birthday.
  • In the past several years, I have spent my birthday alone.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • However, since I have someone who celebrates me this year, I'm looking forward to the small birthday party tonight.
  • However, since I have someone who celebrates my birthday this year, I'm looking forward to the small birthday party tonight.
  • Incidentally, the Egnlish word "birthday" is referred to as 'tanjōbi' (誕生日 - literally "birthday" or "birth date") in Japanese, whereas "birth date" is referred to as 'seinen gappi' (生年月日).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Sei' (生) means "birth," 'nen' (年) means "year," 'ga/getsu/tsuki' (月) means "month," and 'pi/hi' (日) means "day."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Happy Birthday! I hope you have a great time with your special friends!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. (^^)
I could spend last night with a warm feeling.
No. 2 Oceansea's correction
  • My 31st Birthday
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • My 31st Birthday
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Today is my 31th birthday.
  • Today is my 31st birthday.
  • In the past several years, I have spent my birthday alone.
  • In The past several years, I have spent my birthday alone.
  • However, since I have someone who celebrates me this year, I'm looking forward to the small birthday party tonight.
  • However, since I have someone who celebrates me this year, I'm looking forward to the small birthday party tonight.
     Your sentence is gramatically perfect.
    We will more likely say "...celebrates my birthday..." or "...someone to celebrate with..."
  • Incidentally, the Egnlish word "birthday" is referred to as 'tanjōbi' (誕生日 - literally "birthday" or "birth date") in Japanese, whereas "birth date" is referred to as 'seinen gappi' (生年月日).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Sei' (生) means "birth," 'nen' (年) means "year," 'ga/getsu/tsuki' (月) means "month," and 'pi/hi' (日) means "day."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
お誕生日おめでとう!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
ありがとうございます! (^^)
No. 3 Fifi's correction
Oh my. So young. Happy birthday to you!
Toru
Thank you for the comment! I'm flattered. (^^)
No. 4 friendfromfaraway's correction
  • In the past several years, I have spent my birthday alone.
  • For the past several years, I have spent my birthday alone.
  • However, since I have someone who celebrates me this year, I'm looking forward to the small birthday party tonight.
  • However, since I have someone who celebrates with me this year, I'm looking forward to a small birthday party tonight.
  • Incidentally, the Egnlish word "birthday" is referred to as 'tanjōbi' (誕生日 - literally "birthday" or "birth date") in Japanese, whereas "birth date" is referred to as 'seinen gappi' (生年月日).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Sei' (生) means "birth," 'nen' (年) means "year," 'ga/getsu/tsuki' (月) means "month," and 'pi/hi' (日) means "day."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Happy birthday!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and comment! (^^)

Nakittsura ni Hachi (泣きっ面に蜂 - Adding Insult to Injury)

Aug 31, 2018 20:58
Nakittsura ni Hachi

Yesterday, I introduced you to the expression 'fundari kettari' (踏んだり蹴ったり), which means that one bad thing after another happens.

There is another Japanese proverb that has the similar meaning to it -- it is 'nakittsura ni hachi' (泣きっ面に蜂).

'Naki' (泣き) means "crying," 'tsura' (面) means "face," and 'hachi' (蜂) means "bee."

That is to say, nakkittsura ni hachi means that even though someone is crying already because of an unfortunate thing, a bee stings him/her.
泣きっ面に蜂

昨日は、重ねて何度もひどい目にあうことを意味する「踏んだり蹴ったり」という表現を紹介しました。

日本語には、この表現と同様の意味を持つことわざ「泣きっ面に蜂」があります。

「泣き」は "crying," 「面」は "face," 「蜂」は "bee" を意味します。

すなわち「泣きっ面に蜂」とは、不幸なできごとが起こって既に泣いているのに、さらに蜂に刺されるという不幸が起こる、ということです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
  • There is another Japanese proverb that has the similar meaning to it -- it is 'nakittsura ni hachi' (泣きっ面に蜂).
  • There is another Japanese proverb that has a similar meaning to it -- it is 'nakittsura ni hachi' (泣きっ面に蜂).
  • That is to say, nakkittsura ni hachi means that even though someone is crying already because of an unfortunate thing, a bee stings him/her.
  • In other words, nakkittsura ni hachi means that even though someone is crying already because of a misfortune, a bee comes along and stings him/her in the face.
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post. :)

Fundari Kettari (踏んだり蹴ったり - A Streak of Bad Luck)

Aug 30, 2018 17:45
Fundari Kettari

Today was a day described as 'fundari kettari' (踏んだり蹴ったり) to me.

Fundari kettari is an expression meaning that bad things happen to someone in a row.

'Fumu' (踏む) means "to tread on something" and 'keru' (蹴る) means "to kick something."

I think that most Japanese people believe that this expression implies a misfortune of being trodden and kicked.

However, both fundari and kettari are the active voice.

The actual etymology is that treading on and kicking an undesirable thing (such as feces) is the calamity.
踏んだり蹴ったり

今日は「踏んだり蹴ったり」な一日でした。

踏んだり蹴ったりとは、重ねて何度もひどい目にあうことを意味する表現です。

「踏む」は "to tread on something," 「蹴る」は "to kick something" を意味する動詞です。

多くの日本人は、「誰かに踏まれた上に蹴られること」が災難であるため、この言葉が生まれたと勘違いしていると思います。

しかし、踏んだり蹴ったりは能動態です。

実際の語源は、踏んだり蹴ったりしたくないもの(例えば糞便)を、踏んだり蹴ったりしてしまった、ということにあるようです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
  • Fundari kettari is an expression meaning that bad things happen to someone in a row.
  • "Fundari kettari" is an expression meaning that one bad thing after another happens to someone in a row.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

Omaru (おまる - Jerry/Potty)

Aug 29, 2018 19:58
Omaru

In Japan, we call portable indoor toilets 'omaru' (おまる).

'O' (お) is a polite prefix, and 'maru' (まる) is an archaic term that means to discharge one's urine or evacuate one's bowels.

Omaru is written as 御虎子 in kanji, and its literal meaning is "a tiger's child."

In the past, omaru was made of wood, and it had a box shape, but 'koban' (小判 - an oval gold coin) shapes have become common since the Edo period.

Since koban was sometimes called 'tora no ko' (虎の子 - literally "a tiger's child"), the kanji of omaru became 御虎子.
おまる

室内用の携帯型便器のことを、日本語で「おまる」と言います。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「まる」は用を足すことを意味する古語です。

漢字では「御虎子」と書き、文字通りの意味は「虎の子」となります。

かつておまるは木製の箱形のものが使われていましたが、江戸時代以降は小判形のものが普及しました。

当時、小判のことを「虎の子」と言っていたことから、「おまる」の漢字に「御虎子」があてられたそうです。
No. 1 Jallyy's correction
  • In Japan, we call portable indoor toilets 'omaru' (おまる).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'O' (お) is a polite prefix, and 'maru' (まる) is an archaic term that means to discharge one's urine or evacuate one's bowels.
  • 'O' (お) is a polite prefix, and 'maru' (まる) is an archaic term that means to discharge one's urine or evacuamptey one's bowels.
  • Omaru is written as 御虎子 in kanji, and its literal meaning is "a tiger's child."
  • Omaru is written as 御虎子 in Kkanji, and its literal meaning is "a tiger's child."
  • In the past, omaru was made of wood, and it had a box shape, but 'koban' (小判 - an oval gold coin) shapes have become common since the Edo period.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since koban was sometimes called 'tora no ko' (虎の子 - literally "a tiger's child"), the kanji of omaru became 御虎子.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post. :)

Shikaesi, Fukushū, Houfuku (仕返し、復讐、報復)

Aug 28, 2018 20:26
Shikaesi, Fukushū, Houfuku

I introduced you to the Japanese term 'shippe gaeshi' (しっぺ返し - paying back) yesterday.

In addition to it, there are other terms that mean something like "revenge" -- 'shikaeshi' (仕返し), 'fukushū' (復讐) and 'houfuku' (報復).

The most common one is shikaeshi, and it is often used for petty things such as quarrels.

On the other hand, when the scale of the given harm is large, fukushū or houfuku would be used.

Houfuku contains a nuance of an acute resentment.

Fukushū can be used for not only personal matters but also groups or countries.

Additionally, shippe gaeshi is usually used for petty things as well as shikaeshi, but it has a nuance of "immediately" or "in the same way."
仕返し、復讐、報復

私は昨日、「しっぺ返し」という日本語を紹介しました。

害を与えた相手に対して何かをやり返す表現としては、他にも「仕返し」「報復」「復讐」があります。

最も日常的に使われるのは「仕返し」であり、喧嘩などの比較的些細な事柄に対して使われることが多いです。

一方で、与えられた害が大きい場合には、「復讐」「報復」という言葉が使われます。

「復讐」には強い恨みのニュアンスが含まれます。

「報復」は個人の関係だけでなく、互いが集団や国などの場合にも使われます。

また、「しっぺ返し」は「仕返し」と同じく些細な事柄に使われますが、「すぐに」や「同等の方法」のニュアンスが含まれます。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
  • On the other hand, when the scale of the given harm is large, fukushū or houfuku would be used.
  • On the other hand, when the scale of the given harm is great, fukushū or houfuku would be used.
  • Houfuku contains a nuance of an acute resentment.
  • Houfuku contains a nuance of an acute resentment.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

Shippe Gaeshi (しっぺ返し - Paying Back)

Aug 27, 2018 21:27
Shippe Gaeshi

When someone does something bad to you, if you pay him/her in the same coin, the act is called 'shippe gaeshi' (しっぺ返し).

Originally, shippe gaeshi was called 'shippei gaeshi' (竹篦返し).

'Shippei' (竹篦) is a bamboo stick that is used to mentor Zen monks, and 'gaeshi/kaeshi' (返し) means "to get back."

In Zen sitting meditation, when the posture of a monk is disturbed due to distracting thoughts, the guide hits shippei on the monk's shoulder.

That is to say, shippei gaeshi means to hit back shippei. Later, shippei changed to shippe.
しっぺ返し

何かをされたとき、即座に仕返すことを「しっぺ返し」と言います。

しっぺ返しはもともと、「竹篦(しっぺい)返し」と呼ばれていました。

「竹篦」とは、師家が参禅者を指導する際に用いる竹でできた棒状の法具のことで、「返し」は "to get back" を意味します。

座禅では、雑念で姿勢が乱れた際に、戒めのためにこの竹篦を肩に打たれます。

竹篦を打たれたものが打ち返すということから、仕返しのことを「竹篦返し」と言うようになり、「しっぺ返し」になったというわけです。
No. 1 Yukinekorin's correction
Thanks for the interesting posts as always! ^^

Hmm...I've never heard of this phrase before, but I've heard of 仕返し. What's the difference between 仕返し and しっぺ返し?
Toru
Thank you for the nice question!
Both are used for petty things such as quarrels, and 仕返し is more common. As the difference, しっぺ返し has a nuance of "immediately" or "in the same way."
Yukinekorin
Sorry for the late reply. ><
I see! Thanks for sharing with me. So しっぺ返し is more like if you want to get back at them immediately, while 仕返し can be something more long term?
Toru
No need to apologize. (^^)
Yes, that's right. Compared to しっぺ返し, 仕返し can be used in various cases.
No. 2 sjstrauss's correction
  • Shippe Gaeshi
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • When someone does something bad to you, if you pay him/her in the same coin, the act is called 'shippe gaeshi' (しっぺ返し).
  • When someone does something bad to you, if you pay him/her back in the same way, the act is called 'shippe gaeshi' (しっぺ返し).
     I think the original sentence is okay; this is just another way of saying it :) .
  • Originally, shippe gaeshi was called 'shippei gaeshi' (竹篦返し).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Shippei' (竹篦) is a bamboo stick that is used to mentor Zen monks, and 'gaeshi/kaeshi' (返し) means "to get back."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In Zen sitting meditation, when the posture of a monk is disturbed due to distracting thoughts, the guide hits shippei on the monk's shoulder.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • That is to say, shippei gaeshi means to hit back shippei.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Later, shippei changed to shippe.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
How interesting! This is my first time hearing about しっぺ返し.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)
sjstrauss
You're welcome :)

Akane Gumo (茜雲 - Rosy Cloud)

Aug 26, 2018 18:22
Akane Gumo

Yesterday, I introduced you to my favorite kind of clouds, 'nyūdō gumo' (入道雲).

I also like some other types of clouds.

For example, I like 'akane gumo' (茜雲 – literally “madder clouds”), which are made by the morning sun or the setting sun.

'Akane' (茜) is a perennial and climbing plant, and its root can become a dark red dye, so this term also means such a color.

Additionally, 'gumo/kumo' (雲) means "cloud."

That is to say, akane gumo are clouds with dark red that you can see at sunrise or sunset.
茜雲

昨日は、私の好きな雲の種類である入道雲を紹介しました。

私は他にも、幾つかの好きな雲があります。

例えば、朝日や夕日によって茜色をした「茜雲」です。

「茜」はつる性の多年生植物ですが、橙色の根を染料にするとやや暗い赤色になることから、そのような色を表します。

また、「雲」は "cloud" を意味します。

すなわち茜雲とは、日の出や日の入りに見ることのできる「暗い赤色をした雲」というわけです。
No. 1 papillon's correction
  • Yesterday, I introduced you to my favorite kind of clouds, 'nyūdō gumo' (入道雲).
  • Yesterday, I introduced you to my favorite kind of clouds, 'nyūdō gumo' (入道雲).
     this is correct, but saying 'my favourite kind of cloud' is also correct, and sounds more native.
  • I also like some other types of clouds.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • For example, I like 'akane gumo' (茜雲 – literally “madder clouds”), which are made by the morning sun or the setting sun.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Akane' (茜) is a perennial and climbing plant, and its root can become a dark red dye, so this term also means such a color.
  • 'Akane' (茜) is a perennial and climbing plant, and its root can be made into a dark red dye, so this term also refers to this color.
  • That is to say, akane gumo are clouds with dark red that you can see at sunrise or sunset.
  • That is to say, akane gumo are clouds with dark red that you can see at sunrise or sunset.
     this is correct, but more native would be:

    That is to say, akane gumo are dark red clouds that you can see at sunrise or sunset.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

Nyūdō Gumo (入道雲 - Cumulonimbus Cloud)

Aug 25, 2018 21:20
Nyūdō Gumo

I like 'nyūdō gumo' (入道雲), which you can see in the summer sky.

Nyūdō gumo are huge and clear clouds like mountains that are made by rising air currents -- which are called cumulonimbus clouds in English.

'Nyūdō' (入道) is a traditional Japanese specter who has a shaven head, and 'gumo/kumo' (雲) means "cloud."

This term was made by comparing this specter with the high cumulonimbus clouds.

Incidentally, nyūdō gumo is a slang term, and its official name in Japan is 'sekiran un' (積乱雲 - literally "piled and disordered clouds").
入道雲

私は夏の空に見ることができる「入道雲」が好きです。

入道雲とは、上昇気流によって山のように立ち上がる、巨大で美しい雲のことです。

入道とは坊主頭の日本の妖怪のことで、雲は "cloud" を意味します。

雲が空高く盛り上がるようすをこの妖怪にたとえて、入道雲という言葉が生まれました。

ちなみにこの言葉は俗語であり、正式には「積乱雲」と言います。
No. 1 despotically's correction
  • 'Nyūdō' (入道) is a traditional Japanese specter who has a shaven head, and 'gumo/kumo' (雲) means "cloud."
  • 'Nyūdō' (入道) is a traditional Japanese supernatural being with a shaven head, and 'gumo/kumo' (雲) means "cloud."
  • This term was made by comparing this specter with the high cumulonimbus clouds.
  • This term was made by comparing the supernatural being/ghost with the high cumulonimbus clouds.
     spectreという言葉はもうあまり使われていませんので。
勉強になりました!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Kami wo Suku (髪をすく - Thinning Out One's Hair)

Aug 24, 2018 11:12
I had my hair cut at a barbershop yesterday.

Whenever I go to a barbershop, in addition to the order of cut length, I always say "suite kudasai" (すいて下さい) by using the Japanese verb 'suku' (すく).

Suku originally meant to comb, fix or shove one's hair.

However, when you use this verb at barbershops or hair salons, it is usually mean to thin out one's hair or reduce the volume of one's hair.

The reason is probably that the character 'su' (す) itself has a nuance of "hollow."
髪をすく

私は昨日、美容院で散髪をしてきました。

美容院に行くと、私はいつも切る長さの注文に加えて「すく」という動詞を使って「すいて下さい」と言います。

「すく」はもともとクシなどで髪をとかしたり整えたりすることを意味していました。

しかし、美容院などでこの言葉を使った場合、髪の量を少なくするという意味になることが多いです。

これは、「す」という言葉自体に、「隙間があるもの」のニュアンスが含まれるためであると考えられます。
No. 1 Ippos's correction
  • I had my hair cut at a barbershop yesterday.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Whenever I go to a barbershop, in addition to the order of cut length, I always say "suite kudasai" (すいて下さい) by using the Japanese verb 'suku' (すく).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Suku originally meant to comb, fix or shove one's hair.
  • Suku originally meant to comb, fix, or shove one's hair.
  • However, when you use this verb at barbershops or hair salons, it is usually mean to thin out one's hair or reduce the volume of one's hair.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The reason is probably that the character 'su' (す) itself has a nuance of "hollow."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)
No. 2 artboy598's correction
  • I had my hair cut at a barbershop yesterday.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Whenever I go to a barbershop, in addition to the order of cut length, I always say "suite kudasai" (すいて下さい) by using the Japanese verb 'suku' (すく).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • However, when you use this verb at barbershops or hair salons, it is usually mean to thin out one's hair or reduce the volume of one's hair.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The reason is probably that the character 'su' (す) itself has a nuance of "hollow."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Thank you!
Toru
Thank you always for reading my post! (^^)

Fuseki (布石 - Preparation)

Aug 23, 2018 18:47
Fuseki

I introduced you to Japanese terms two days ago and three days ago.

Additionally, yesterday I introduced a coined word that is made by combining the previous two Japanese terms.

As I did, to prepare for something in advance for the future is called 'fuseki' (布石) in Japanese.

'Fu' (布) means "to arrange/deploy" and 'seki' (石) means "stone," especially here it is "Go stone."

Originally, fuseki was a term of Go, and it has meant to arrange/deploy stones in the early stage preparing for the later stage.

Connected to the above meaning, it has come to be used in various situations.
布石

私は2日前と3日前に、ある日本語を紹介しました。

そして昨日、紹介した2つの日本語を組み合わせた造語を紹介しました。

このように、将来に備えてあらかじめ準備や手配をしておくことを、「布石」と言います。

「布」は "to deploy,"「石」は "stone," 特に "go stone" を意味します。

もともと「布石」は囲碁用語であり、対局の序盤に全体の局面を見据えて石を打つことを意味していました。

この意味が広がり、現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Jallyy's correction
  • Fuseki (布石 - Preparation)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I introduced you to Japanese terms two days ago and three days ago.
  • I introduced you to some Japanese terms two and three days ago.
  • Additionally, yesterday I introduced a coined word that is made by combining the previous two Japanese terms.
  • Additionally, yesterday I introduced a coined word made by combining the previous two Japanese terms.
  • As I did, to prepare for something in advance for the future is called 'fuseki' (布石) in Japanese.
  • In the same way, I will be introducing another coined word. To prepare in advance for the future is called 'fuseki' (布石) in Japanese.
  • 'Fu' (布) means "to arrange/deploy" and 'seki' (石) means "stone," especially here it is "Go stone."
  • "Fu" (布) means "to arrange/deploy" and "seki" (石) means "stone". Together it means "Go stone."
  • Originally, fuseki was a term of Go, and it has meant to arrange/deploy stones in the early stage preparing for the later stage.
  • Originally, fuseki was a term used in the game "Go", and it meant to arrange stones early in preparation for later.
  • Connected to the above meaning, it has come to be used in various situations.
  • Expanding on the original meaning, it has now come to be used in various situations.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

> In the same way, I will be introducing another coined word. To prepare in advance for the future is called 'fuseki' (布石) in Japanese.
It is difficult for me to explain, but I wanted to say something like:
I introduced two terms in advance as a preparation for the yesterday's term. This preparation like I did can be called 'fuseki.'
Jallyy
あぁ、なるほど!私の違った理解にはごめんなさい。
はい、英語で説明するのは難しいですね。
これは私の新しい添削。

I introduced two terms in advance, to lay the groundwork for yesterday's term. This preparation is an example of/can be called "fuseki".
Toru
Thank you for the additional correction! (^^)

Urayamakeshikaran (うらやまけしからん)

Aug 22, 2018 12:14
Urayamakeshikaran

I introduced you to 'keshikaran' (けしからん) two days ago and 'urayamashī' (うらやましい) yesterday.

Today I would like to introduce the slang term 'urayamakeshikaran' (うらやまけしからん), which was made by combining these two terms.

As explained in previous posts, keshikaran expresses a feeling of anger to unreasonable/undesirable things, whereas urayamashī expresses a sense of longing for someone's lucky situation.

Therefore, the combination means that a situation is unreasonable, so you should against for that, but you have a longing for the situation in your heart.

Urayamakeshikaran is mainly used when seeing sexual situations or cute animals.
うらやまけしからん

一昨日は「けしからん」を、昨日は「うらやましい」を紹介しました。

今日はこれら2つの言葉を組み合わせた「うらやまけしからん」という俗語を紹介します。

既に説明したとおり、「けしからん」は道理に外れた物事に対する怒りの気持ちを、「うらやましい」は他人の恵まれた状態に憧れる気持ちを表す言葉です。

そして「うらやまけしからん」は、道理に外れていて本来諌めるべきであっても、本音では憧れの気持ちがあるときに使われます。

この言葉は、性的なシチュエーションや、かわいい動物に対して使われることが多いです。
No. 1 Valin's correction
  • Urayamakeshikaran
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I introduced you to 'keshikaran' (けしからん) two days ago and 'urayamashī' (うらやましい) yesterday.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Today I would like to introduce the slang term 'urayamakeshikaran' (うらやまけしからん), which was made by combining these two terms.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • As explained in previous posts, keshikaran expresses a feeling of anger to unreasonable/undesirable things, whereas urayamashī expresses a sense of longing for someone's lucky situation.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Therefore, the combination means that a situation is unreasonable, so you should against for that, but you have a longing for the situation in your heart.
  • Therefore, the combination means that a situation is unreasonable, so you should against it for that, but you have a longing for the situation in your heart.
There are pretty much no grammatical errors that I can see!

Reminds me of the English phrase "guilty pleasure" haha. It's something that you openly say you dislike but you enjoy it while no one is present.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)
And thank you for letting me know the interesting phrase! Indeed I think its nuance is similar to the one of urayamakeshikaran.
No. 2 Kyle's correction
  • Urayamakeshikaran (うらやまけしからん)
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Urayamakeshikaran
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I introduced you to 'keshikaran' (けしからん) two days ago and 'urayamashī' (うらやましい) yesterday.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Today I would like to introduce the slang term 'urayamakeshikaran' (うらやまけしからん), which was made by combining these two terms.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • As explained in previous posts, keshikaran expresses a feeling of anger to unreasonable/undesirable things, whereas urayamashī expresses a sense of longing for someone's lucky situation.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Therefore, the combination means that a situation is unreasonable, so you should against for that, but you have a longing for the situation in your heart.
  • Therefore, the combination means that a situation is unreasonable, so while you should against for that feel repulsed, but you have a longing for the situation in your heart.
     "against for that" is an island of mistakes in a sea of otherwise flawless English. I am not 100% sure what you meant even when I (try to) read the Japanese, but I think you mean that you want the situation despite the fact that you do not want it. Like you want and do not want at the same time. Or maybe you know that you should not want it, but you do anyway.

    One construction we might use is "Despite X, Y" meaning "X is true, and Y and X usually do not go together, but this time they do." "Despite being an athlete, his legs are not muscular." That kind of thing.

    I made my suggestion above a little more "spicy": "feel repulsed" is how you feel when you strongly dislike something.
  • Urayamakeshikaran is mainly used when seeing sexual situations or cute animals.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and suggestion. :)
I didn't know the term "feel repulsed," but it is probably closer to what I wanted to say.

Urayamashī (うらやましい - Envious)

Aug 21, 2018 21:39
Urayamashī

When you think that someone is favored/rich and you want to become such a person, you can say 'urayamashī' (うらやましい) to express the feeling.

Urayamashī is an adjective form of the verb 'urayamu' (うらやむ).

'Ura' (うら) means inside/behind something, especially here it means "one's heart."

In addition, 'yamu' (やむ) means to be taken sick.

Originally, this term literally meant that one's mind becomes a disease by seeing someone's privileged status.

However, these days it is mainly used to express a sense of longing that you want to become such a gifted or lucky person.
うらやましい

他人が恵まれているように見えて、自分もそうなりたいという気持ちであるとき、日本語で「うらやましい」と言うことがあります。

「うらやましい」は、動詞「うらやむ」を形容詞にしたものです。

「うら」は人の目が届かない方の面を、特にここでは「心」を意味します。

また、「やむ」は病気になることを意味します。

もともとこの言葉は、文字通り他人の恵まれた状態を見て「心が病む」ことを意味していました。

しかし現在では、心が病んだり相手を妬むという意味よりも、自分もそうなりたいという気持ちを表す際によく使われます。

Keshikaran (けしからん - Unreasonable)

Aug 20, 2018 14:21
Keshikaran

When something is unreasonable and undesirable, you can express anger feelings by using the following phrase:

"Keshikaran" (けしからん).

'Keshikaru/keshikara' can be written as 異しかる or 怪しかる in kanji, and it means that something is abnormal.

Additionally, '-n' (ん) is a change in the sound of the negative auxiliary verb '-zu/nu' (ず/ぬ).

You might think that the denial of abnormal is normal.

However, the denial of abnormal here expresses that it is not just abnormal, it is terribly abnormal.

Meanwhile, these days on the Internet, this phrase is often used to mean "it is too sexy/cute."
けしからん

物事が道理に外れていて好ましくないとき、怒りの気持ちを以下の言葉で表現することがあります。

「けしからん。」

「けしかる(けしから)」は「異しかる」もしくは「怪しかる」と書き、何かが普通と違って異常であることを意味します。

そして「ん」は、打ち消しを意味する助動詞「ず/ぬ」の音が変化したものです。

「異常である」の打ち消しは、「普通である」と考えるかもしれません。

しかしここでの否定は、「単なる異常ではない。とんでもなく異常だ。」ということを表します。

一方、近年のインターネットにおいてこの言葉は「セクシーすぎる」や「可愛すぎる」という意味で使われることもあります。
No. 1 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

Ochame (お茶目 - Mischievous)

Aug 19, 2018 20:08
Ochame

There are some people around me who are called 'ochame' (お茶目).

Ochame means that someone is mischievous or innocent and lovable.

'O' (お) is a polite prefix, but there are several theories about the etymology of 'chame' (茶目).

One theory says that chame was made by combining 'cha' (茶) and 'me' (め).

'Cha' usually means "tea," but it can also mean "antic" or "cursory."

Also, 'me' usually means "eye," but it can also mean "to comport oneself as something."

Another theory said that chame comes from 'chameri' (ちゃめり), which means "antic" or "playful."
お茶目

私の周りにはよく「お茶目」と呼ばれる人がいます。

「お茶目」とは、無邪気で愛らしいさまや、子供っぽいさまを表す言葉です。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞ですが、「茶目」の語源に関しては幾つかの説があります。

1つ目の説は、「茶」と「目」が組み合わさったというものです。

「茶」は通常 "tea" を意味しますが、この字には「おどけた」や「いいかげんな」という意味もあります。

そして、「目」は「それらしく振る舞う」を意味する「めかす」から来ているというものです。

もう一つの説は、「おどける」や「ふざける」などの意味を持つ「ちゃめり」から来たというものです。

Mountain Climbing Alone

Aug 18, 2018 15:31
Mountain Climbing Alone

Today I woke up early and tried to climb Mountain Hinode alone.

Since it takes about only three hours to climb up and down the mountain, it might be closer to hiking than climbing.

However, it was really tough for me to reach the top of the mountain, because these days I have not taken exercise.

When I reached the mountain's peak, I felt awful, so I needed to rest on a bench for about 30 minutes.

After recovering from the bad feeling, I realized that there were beautiful mountains with a nice view.

This is the best part of climbing.
一人登山

今日は早起きし、一人で日の出山を登りに行きました。

往復約3時間のコースで、登山というよりはハイキングに近いです。

しかし、最近運動していなかった私にとって、山頂まで行くのはとても大変でした。

山頂についたら、吐きそうになってしまい、30分くらい座って休む必要がありした。

そして気分が落ち着いてからまわりを見渡すと、見晴らしの良い素敵な景色が広がっていました。

登山の醍醐味です。
No. 1 Kaymona's correction
That sounds like a great time with gorgeous views! ^_^
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations. :)
No. 2 David's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the helpful correction. :)

A Family Trip during Bon Day 2

Aug 17, 2018 22:59
A Family Trip during Bon Day 2

On the second day of the Nagano trip, we first went to the Chihiro Art Museum Azumino.

Chihiro IWASAKI is a famous artist painter and picture book writer in Japan, and she has affected a lot of Japanese people including my family.

In this art museum, in addition to her works, there were many picture books by various artists around the world.

After visiting there, we went to an innkeeping town called Naraijuku, which is located at an altitude of about 900 meters.

Since traditional Japanese houses and streets were kept, it was beautiful.
お盆の親族旅行2日目

長野旅行の2日目は、まず安曇野ちひろ美術館に行きました。

いわさきちひろは日本で有名な画家・絵本作家で、私の両親や私を含め、多くの日本人に影響を与えました。

この美術館には彼女の作品を中心に、世界の絵本画家の作品が展示されており、とても楽しめました。

その後は、奈良井宿という標高約900mに位置する宿場町を訪れました。

古き日本の町並みが残されており、とても美しかったです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

A Family Trip during Bon Day 1

Aug 16, 2018 23:42
A Family Trip during Bon Day 1

I went to Azumino city, Nagano, with my family and relatives during the last two days of Bon holidays (that is, from August 14th to 15th).

First, we visited Daiō Wasabi Farm (大王わさび農場 - literally "King wasabi farm"), then saw the wasabi farm and ate dishes that use wasabi.

Transparent water on the farm was very beautiful, and the wasabi dishes were delicious.

After that, we checked in at a hotel, got into a hot spring, and went to a fireworks display.

We really enjoyed a grand display of 12,000 fireworks in the night sky.
お盆の親族旅行1日目

私はお盆休みの最終日二日間(すなわち8月14~15日)を利用して、親族と長野の安曇野市に遊びに行きました。

まずは大王わさび農場に行き、わさび園を見たり、わさびを使った料理を食べたりしました。

透き通った水がとても綺麗で、わさび料理も美味しかったです。

その後旅館に行き、温泉に入ってから花火大会に行きました。

夜空に広がる1万2千発の花火をじっくり楽しむことができました。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)
No. 2 David's correction
The commonly used phrase is 'crystal clear.'
Toru
Thank you for letting me know the phrase. :)

Fūrin (風鈴 - Wind Bell)

Aug 15, 2018 17:58
Fūrin

Three years ago, I wrote an article about 'fūrin' (風鈴 - wind bell).

Today I would like to talk about fūrin in more detail.

'Fū' (風) means "wind" and 'rin' (鈴) means "bell."

Therefore, fūrin is a bell that sounds by taking the wind as the characters indicate.

In the past, fūrin was used as a tool of fortune telling in China.

This was imported to Japan as an amulet tool when the time Buddhism was introduced.

Then, over a long period of time, it has changed to an item that represents summer.
風鈴

約三年前、私は「風鈴」についての記事を書きました。

今日は「風鈴」について、もう少し詳しく紹介します。

「風」は "wind," 「鈴」は "bell" を意味します。

すなわち風鈴とは、風を受けて音が鳴る鈴というわけです。

かつて風鈴は、中国で占いの道具として使われていました。

これが日本に、魔除けの道具として伝わったそうです。

そして長い年月をかけ、夏の風物詩へと変化していったそうです。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
If someone's mom rang a 風鈴、would it be a 風鈴母さん?(風林火山)

(すみません、ダジャレなんだよ!)
friendfromfaraway
In English, a bell like this is usually called a wind "chime" (chime is a word used for the sound of a bell ringing) :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!

Haha, 風鈴母さん sounds interesting.
Yes, when hearing the term, Japanese people probably image someone's mother who rings a wind chime frequently.

Yukata (浴衣)

Aug 14, 2018 05:19
Yukata

In this season, I sometimes see people who are wearing 'yukata' (浴衣).

Yukata is a kind of Japanese summer clothes, which is an unlined kimono (着物 - traditional Japanese clothes).

This term comes from 'yukatabira' (湯帷子), which was used during the Heian period.

'Yu' (湯) means "bath" and 'katabira' (帷子) means an unlined kimono for summer.

Therefore, yukatabira means a cloth to hide one's skin while taking a bath.

Originally, only those of high-rank used yukatabira, but after cotton spread in the Edo period, it came to be called 'yukata' for short and became common as casual wear for summer.
浴衣

この時期、たまに「浴衣」を着ている人を見かけます。

浴衣とは、素肌の上に着る単衣の着物のことです。

この言葉は、平安時代に使われていた「湯帷子」から来ています。

「湯」は "bath"、「帷子」は夏用の単衣の衣のことです。

すなわち湯帷子とは、入浴の際に肌を隠す衣のことです。

もともと湯帷子は貴族が用いたものでしたが、江戸時代に木綿が普及すると、「ゆかた」と略され、夏の普段着として庶民にも広まりました。
No. 1 Casper Alixander's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Gobusata (ご無沙汰)

Aug 13, 2018 11:52
Gobusata

The most common Japanese greeting when you meet with someone for the first time in a long time is 'hisashiburi' (久しぶり) or 'ohisashiburi desu' (お久しぶりです).

In addition, there is the more formal expression, 'gobusata shiteorimasu' (ご無沙汰しております).

'Go' (ご) is a polite prefix, 'bu' (無) means "nothing," and 'sata' (沙汰) means "contact" or "news."

That is to say, gobusata means "These days we have not made contact."

However, if you use just gobusata as a noun, it could become a slang term which implies that you have not done sexual activity for a while.
ご無沙汰

誰かと久しぶりに会ったときの挨拶として最も一般的なのは、「久しぶり」や「お久しぶりです」だと思います。

また、よりフォーマルな表現として、「ご無沙汰しております」があります。

「ご」は丁寧の接頭辞、「無」は "nothing," 「沙汰」は "contact" や "news" を意味します。

すなわち「ご無沙汰」とは、"These days we don't make contact" のような意味になります。

ただ、「ご無沙汰」を挨拶ではなく単に名詞として使う場合、しばらく性行為をしていないという隠語になるので注意して下さい。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

Ikagawashii (いかがわしい)

Aug 12, 2018 21:08
Today I saw 'ikagawashii yume' (いかがわしい夢).

'Ikagawashii' (いかがわしい) is an adjective that means "dubious" or "doubtful," and 'yume' (夢) means "dream."

'Ika' (いか) was a word expressing a feeling of doubt, and it became a basis of 'ikaga' (いかが), which is an adverb that is used to asking for opinions.

Furthermore, ikaga changed to the adjective 'ikagashi' (いかがし), and it finally changed to ikagawashii.

However, note that these days ikagawashii often means "obscene" or "unethical."

For example, if you say ikagawashii yume, it will probably mean "wet dream" or "lewd dream."
いかがわしい

私は今日、「いかがわしい夢」を見ました。

「いかがわしい」は「怪しげな」や「疑わしい」という意味の形容詞で、「夢」は "dream" を意味します。

「いか」は疑いの気持ちを表す語で、そこから意見などを尋ねる副詞「いかが」が生まれ、これが形容詞化して「いかがし」となり、最終的に「いかがわしい」に変化したそうです。

しかし、近年では意味が派生し、「道徳上よくない」ことや「みだらな」ことも意味することに注意して下さい。

例えば、「いかがわしい夢」と言った場合、大抵は「いかがわしい」は後者の意味になります。
No. 1 Yukinekorin's correction
Haha, thanks for the heads up! I probably wouldn't try to use this word as often then. xD
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)
Yes, I think that it is better to avoid using this word, haha.

Traffic Jams at Midnight

Aug 11, 2018 23:02
Traffic Jams at Midnight

Today is the Japanese national holiday called 'Yama no Hi' (山の日 - literally "Mountain Day").

In most Japanese companies, the long summer holidays called 'obon yasumi' (お盆休み - literally "Bon Holidays") began today.

I also returned my parents' home in Aichi from Tokyo.

In order to avoid traffic jams accompanying the holidays, I departed by car around 1:30 am, but I underestimated this holiday.

Despite midnight, I got traffic jams on the expressway.

I tried to take rest on a rest area, but there was no space to stop.

Surprisingly, the length of the traffic jams grew to around 30 kilometers at aroud noon.
深夜の渋滞

今日は山の日、国民の祝日です。

日本では多くの企業が、今日から「お盆休み」と呼ばれる夏季長期休暇に入ります。

私も今日、東京から実家の愛知に、車で帰省しました。

渋滞を避けるため、深夜1時半ごろに出発したのですが、帰省ラッシュを甘く見ていました。

真夜中にもかかわらず、高速道路に渋滞ができていたのです。

途中でパーキングエリアに寄りましたが、駐車スペースがなくて素通りしてしまいました。

昼頃になると、30km 程の渋滞ができていたようで、恐ろしいです。
No. 1 sleekkat's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

Gomenkudasai (ごめんください - Anyone Around?)

Aug 10, 2018 02:34
Gomenkudasai

When visiting someone's house, Japanese people often say 'gomenkudasai' (ごめんください) at the entrance.

'Go' (ご) is a polite prefix, 'men' (めん) mean "pardon" or "forgive," and 'kudasai' (ください) means "please."

That is to say, gomenkudasai implies your feelings of apologies for suddenly visiting someone's house.

Originally, this phrase literalle meant apologies, but these days it is mainly used as a greeting when visiting someone's house.

If you say 'gomen-nasai' (ごめんなさい), by replacing 'kudasai' (ください) with 'nasai' (なさい), it just means "I'm sorry."
ごめんください

他人の家を訪れるとき、日本人はよく「ごめんください」と言います。

「ご」は尊敬の接頭語、「めん」は "pardon" や "forgive," 「ください」は "please" を意味します。

すなわち「ごめんください」とは、突然家を訪問してごめんなさいということを表しています。

もともとは文字通り、許しを請う際に使われていましたが、現在では家を訪問する際の挨拶として使われることが多いです。

「ください」の代わりに「なさい」を使って「ごめんなさい」と言うと、単なる謝罪の言葉になります。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Thanks for the lessons as always!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Kokoro ni Shimiru (心にしみる - Being Impressed)

Aug 9, 2018 15:22
Kokoro ni Shimiru

When expressing that you are impressed by something in English, you probably say in the way that something acts on someone, such as "to be impressed by" or "to be moved by."

On the other hand, Japanese people usually express it in the way that the someone just acts, such as 'kandō shita' (感動した - literally "I did kandō").

However, there is another Japanese expression, which uses the way of saying that something acts on someone.

It is 'kokoro ni shimiru' (心にしみる).

'Kokoro' (心) means "heart" and 'shimiru' (しみる) means "to soak into."

Therefore, this expression means that someone is impressed as if something soaks into the one's heart.
心にしみる

何かに感動したことを表すとき、英語では "to be impressed by" や "to be moved by" のように、対象が人を感動させる言い方が多いと思います。

一方で日本語では、「感動した」のように、人が主体で言うことが多いです。

しかし、対象が主体となる表現も存在します。

それは、「心にしみる」です。

「心」は "heart," 「しみる」は "to soak into" を意味します。

すなわち「心にしみる」とは、何かがあなたの心にゆっくりと染み込むように、感動するということです。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post. :)

Kono Ue Naku (この上なく - Supremely)

Aug 8, 2018 14:56
Kono Ue Naku

Today I would like to introduce you to the Japanese expression 'kono ue naku' (この上なく), which means "most" or "supremely."

'Kono' (この) means "this," 'ue' (上) means "up" or "top," and 'naku' means "nothing," so the literal meaning of 'kono ue naku' is "There is nothing that is higher than this."

As you can guess, this expression implies that the thing is the best.

You can make a more calm and elegant impression by using this than using direct expressions such as 'saikō' (最高 - best/greatest).

【Example sentence】
Kono ue naku shiawase da (この上なく幸せだ - I'm as happy as can be).
この上なく

今日は、"most" や "supremely" を意味する形容表現「この上なく」という日本語を紹介します。

「この」は "this," 「上」は "up" や "top," 「なく」は "nothing" を意味するので、「この上なく」の文字通りの意味は "There is nothing that is higher than this" となります。

それよりも高いものがないということは、それが「最高」「最上」のものであるということです。

"Best" や "greatest" を直接的に意味する「最高」などの表現を使うよりも、相手に穏やかで上品な印象を与えることができます。

【例文】
この上なく幸せだ。
No. 1 Jim's correction
Good job!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

Hadazamui (肌寒い - Chilly)

Aug 7, 2018 13:39
Hadazamui

It is raining today, so I feel a little cold air in spite of summer.

To feeling a cold like this is expressed as 'hadazamui' (肌寒い) in Japanese.

'Hada' (肌) means "skin" and 'zamui/samui' (寒い) means "to feel cold."

That is to say, hadazamui literally means to feel a little cold on your skin.

However, since 'hadazamu' (肌寒) was originally a season word for autumn in haiku (俳句 - Japanese seventeen-syllable poems), traditionally, this term was used from the end of summer to the beginning of autumn.
肌寒い

今日は雨が降っており、夏なのに少し空気が冷たく感じます。

このような寒さのことを、「肌寒い」と表現することがあります。

「肌」は "skin," 「寒い」は "to feel cold" を意味します。

すなわち「肌寒い」は文字通り、肌に少し寒さを感じることを表します。

ただ、もともと「肌寒」は俳句における秋の季語であったため、この表現は夏の終わりから秋にかけて使うのが、伝統的な使い方と言えます。
No. 1 Valin's correction
That's very interesting, I'll try to remember this and use it with my friends sometime!

逆に、「冬なのに熱い」に相当する表現がありますか?
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)

「冬なのに暑い」に完璧に相当する表現は、思いつきませんでした。
単に「冬なのに暑い」「冬なのに暖かい」と言うことが多いと思います。

ちなみに、
初冬の暖かく晴れた天気のことを「小春日和」、
冬の穏やかに晴れた天気のことを「冬日和」と言ったりします。
Valin
へー、それ面白いですね! 教えてくれてありがとうございます!

Thirty-Six Books

Aug 6, 2018 12:44
Thirty-Six Books

I have been trouble deciding on a topic for posts on Lang-8 lately.

Therefore, I looked for books concerning words or culture on the Kindle store, in order to use them as a reference for a topic.

Then, I noticed that a special sale was being held -- many books were sold for 99 yen (about 89 cents).

Impulsively, I clicked "Buy now with 1-Click" button many times, and finally, I bought 36 books.

I bought various kinds of books -- books of kanji, books of English grammar, books of history, books of religion, books of trivia, etc.

I will write entries using these books starting tomorrow.
36冊の本

私は最近いつも、 Lang-8 に投稿するトピックに困っています。

そこで今日は、トピックの参考にするため kindle で本を買おうと思い、言葉や文化に関する本を探しました。

すると、多くの書籍が99円になるというお得なセールが開催されていました。

ついつい「1-Clickで今すぐ買う」を何度も押してしまい、気がつくと36冊の本を購入していました。

言葉の本、漢字の本、英文法の本、歴史の本、宗教の本、雑学の本などさまざまです。

明日以降、これらの本を使って記事を投稿していこうと思います。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Yay!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
Hehe. :)

Yudan (油断 - Carelessness)

Aug 5, 2018 22:26
Yudan

To let one's guard down or to be careless is called 'yudan' (油断) in Japanese.

'Yu' (油) means "oil" and 'dan' (断) means "to cut off" or "to break."

There are two major theories about its etymology.

One is that it comes from the story of Buddhist scriptures; "A king gave his servant a bowl of oil, and said that when he spills the oil, his life would be cut off."

The other one is that it comes from the archaic Japanese word 'yutani' (ゆたに), which means to relax.
油断

気をゆるめることや、注意を怠ることを、「油断」と言います。

「油」は "oil," 「断」は "to cut off" や "to break" を意味します。

この言葉の語源には、大きく以下の二つの説があります。

一つは、仏教の経典の「王が家臣に油の入った鉢を持たせ、一滴でもこぼしたら命を断つと命じた」という話から来たという説です。

もう一つは、ゆったりすることを意味する古語の「ゆたに」が変化して、「ゆだん」になったという説です。
No. 1 despotically's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

The World's Shortest Love Letter Part 2

Aug 4, 2018 16:41
The World's Shortest Love Letter Part 2

When the New Year came, the research members in the Antarctic got messages with telegrams from their families.

Among them, a wife of a member tried to send a message from Japan by her own hands with the help of engineers.

The message was アナタ (read as 'anata'), which means "you" in English.

Since these characters looked as if it was a love letter containing various feelings, such as "love," "loneliness," and "anxiety," the research members were deeply impressed.

However, what she really wanted to say was "You, don't drink too much."
世界一短いラブレター Part 2

正月になると、南極に派遣された隊員達に家族から電報が届きました。

その中でも、ある隊員の妻は、技師の力を借りつつ自らメッセージを打ち込んだそうです。

そのメッセージは、"you" を意味する「アナタ」の3文字でした。

この3文字は「愛情」「寂しさ」「不安」などさまざまな感情が込められているラブレターのようで、隊員達は感動をしたそうです。

しかし、本当に彼女が言いたかったのは、「酒を飲みすぎないよう気をつけなさい」ということだったそうです。
No. 1 weeniemon's correction
想像を付かなかった!面白くて笑いました ^_^;
Toru
Thank you for the comment, weeniemon-san. (^^)
No. 2 artboy598's correction
Interesting story!
Toru
Thank you for the comment, artboy-san! :)
No. 3 Fifi's correction
LOL
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

The World's Shortest Love Letter Part 1

Aug 3, 2018 16:19
Today, I would like to introduce you to the episode of the world's shortest love letter.

In 1956, the first Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition was sent to Shōwa Station in Antarctica.

And eleven of them tried to overwinter in Antarctica, but the unimaginable severity of nature hindered it.

According to records, their tents were blown off by blizzard, two-thirds of the food washed into drift ice, and they lived by eating seals and seagulls.

In that era, there was neither internet nor telephone -- the only communication means was a telegram.

It was a very precious time for them to communicate with their families using telegrams.

To be continued.
世界一短いラブレター Part 1

今日は、世界一短いラブレターのエピソードを紹介します。

1956年、第1次南極地域観測隊が、昭和基地に派遣されました。

そして11名の隊員が、南極での越冬を試みるも、想像を絶する大自然の厳しさが襲い掛かります。

テントは飛ばされ、食糧は流氷に流され、アザラシやカモメを食べながらの生活を送ったようです。

この時代、インターネットも電話もなく、唯一の連絡手段は電報でした。

彼らにとって、電報を使った家族との交流は、なによりも楽しみなものでした。

続く。
No. 1 Will's correction
Well written and interesting!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

> 4) Something washed the food. The food didn't do the washing. Use the passive voice.
Since there was the expression "His boat washed into the river," I used the active voice, but is this expression wrong too?

> I don't understand what you mean by precious. What are you trying to say?
Sorry, I needed to explain more.
The time to communicate with their families using telegrams (private usage) was extremely limited. Therefore, the limited communication time was very important to them.
Will
4) Yes, you need to change that expression to "his boat was washed into the river," because it is the river that is doing the action of the verb. So you could also say "The river washed his boat away." But it is never the boat that does the washing.

Okay, so you need to explain that the time was limited in the sentence, so you could say:
"They had a limited time to communicate with their families using telegrams. This time was precious to them."
Toru
Thank you for the comment. :)

According to the following dictionary site, the verb "wash" can means "to become carried along on water" when it is used as an intransitive verb.
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wash

Additionally, the following dictionary site says that "wash" can mean "to be carried or driven by water," and there is an example sentence, "The boat had washed ashore in the night."
https://www.dictionary.com/browse/wash

Since I would like to mean "the food was carried by water" rather than "the food was cleansed by water," I think I should use "wash" as an active voice but does my thought wrong?
Will
1st definition: The verb in this case does not explain the action of moving from land (or somewhere not in the water) into the water. It is already in the water and just moves along the water. Also it is very rare to use the verb like this. It sounds strange to me.

2nd definition: Here, the movement is from the water to land (or more water), but not from land to water.

I supposed that you wanted to say that the food started on land then taken away by the water and lost. In this case you should use the passive voice.

Maybe if you said "the food washed AWAY into drift ice" it sounds better, but I'm not sure.

I never knew the word "wash" could be so complicated!
Toru
Thank you for the explanation!
I would like to try to use various expressions. :)
No. 2 David's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

> time --> means/method
Here, I wanted to say something like the following:
Since the time to communicate with their families using a telegram was extremely limited, such a time was very precious for them.
David
Your modified sentence is much better.

I think I understand the feeling you want to express through your use of 'precious.' Good word. However, I still have a bit of a problem with it because it focuses on time.

Communicating via telegraph is asynchronous. A message is sent and then a response might not be received for hours or days. There isn't really any 'time' to feel precious about using this method of communication. If something like a phone or shortwave radio were used then there would be a real time conversation. The time that the conversation took would be precious.

You could use 'precious' related to a telegraph message like this.

Since the length of the messages that can be passed using a telegram are so short each word was very precious to them.

Or something like that. ;o)
David
Each message passed by telegram was precious to them.
David
Each short message passed by telegram was precious to them.
Toru
Thank you so much for the explanation. :)
I understand well.

Koibumi (恋文 - Love Letter)

Aug 2, 2018 16:28
Koibumi

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese word 'tegami' (手紙), which means a "letter."

Among them, letters for expressing feelings of love are especially called 'koibumi' (恋文) in Japanese.

'Koi' (恋) means "love" and 'bumi/fumi' (文) means "sentence."

Koibumi is a literal translation of the English "love letter," and it has come to be used since around the Taishō period.

However, these days the English loanword 'raburetā' (ラブレター) is more general than koibumi.

Tomorrow I would like to talk about some trivia concerning a love letter.
恋文

昨日は "letter" を意味する「手紙」という日本語を紹介しました。

「手紙」の中でも、愛を告白するための手紙のことを、「恋文」と言います。

「恋」は "love," 「文」は "sentence" を意味します。

「恋文」は英語の "love letter" を翻訳したもので、大正時代頃に使われるようになったそうです。

しかし現在では、「ラブレター」という表現のほうがよく使われます。

明日は、ラブレターに関する雑学について話したいと思います。
No. 1 aquasuicune's correction
Very well done!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

Tegami (手紙 - Letter)

Aug 1, 2018 21:58
Tegami

A paper, on which messages or information is written, is called "letter" in English, whereas it is called 'tegami' (手紙) in Japanese.

'Te' (手) means "hand" and 'gami/kami' (紙) means "paper."

Therefore, the word tegami was originally used to mean a convenient paper at hand.

The most accepted theory about its etymology is that the character 'te' could also mean "technique to write letters" or "characters."

Incidentally, I heard that 手紙 means "toilet paper" in China.

When I was writing this entry, I remembered that I needed to buy toilet papers for my apartment.
手紙

用件や情報を書いて人に送るものを英語で "letter" を言いますが、日本語では「手紙」と言います。

「手」は "hand," 「紙」は "paper" を意味します。

このため、「手紙」はもともと「手元に置いて使う紙」を意味していました。

これが "letter" を意味するようになった有力な説としては、「手」という字に「文字を書く技」や「文字」という意味が含まれているからというものがあります。

ちなみに、中国で「手紙」はトイレットペーパーを意味するそうです。

この記事を書いていて、自宅のトイレットペーパーを補充しなければいけないことを思い出しました。
No. 1 ariso07's correction
Very interesting and well written.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

Socha (粗茶 - "Coarse Tea")

Jul 31, 2018 23:08
Socha

In Japan, when serving tea to visitors, we sometimes say "socha desuga" (粗茶ですが).

Since 'so' (粗) means "coarse" or "low-grade" and 'cha' (茶) means "tea," socha means "low-grade and coarse tea."

Also, 'desuga' (ですが) is a conjunction that means "but" or "however."

It might be strange for foreigners that we serve tea while explaining that the tea is coarse and low-grade.

Actually, this is a respectful expression peculiar to Japan, which lowers one's own position.

In other words, this expression implies that this tea may be not good compared to tea you drink daily, but I prepared it made with love, so please drink it.
粗茶

日本では、来客にお茶を出す際に「粗茶ですが」と言うことがあります。

「粗」は "coarse" や "low-grade," 「茶」は "tea" を意味するので、「粗茶」は "low-grade and coarse tea" を意味します。

また、「ですが」は "however" を意味する接続詞です。

外国人は、まずいお茶と説明しながら客に飲み物を出すこの文化を変に思うかもしれません。

これは、「粗茶」と言うことで自身を下げ、相手を持ち上げる、日本特有の尊敬表現なのです。

言い換えると、この表現は暗に、「あなたが普段口にするお茶に比べれば粗茶ですが、頑張って煎れましたので飲んでください」ということを意味しています。
No. 1 papillon's correction
Your English is excellent. Well done!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections.
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Giri-giri (ぎりぎり - "Barely")

Jul 30, 2018 22:04
Giri-giri

Today I 'giri-giri' (ぎりぎり - "barely") met a deadline.

Giri-giri is an onomatopoeia that represents that something is close to a limit or there is no room, and it is also used as an adverb.

It is thought that 'giri' (ぎり) in giri-giri comes from the Japanese noun 'kagiri' (限り), which means "limit."

When making it just in time, we often say 'giri-giri sēfu' (ぎりぎりセーフ - "barely okay").

On the other hand, when missing something by a hair, we sometimes say 'giri-giri auto' (ぎりぎりアウト - "just failed").
ぎりぎり

私は今日、ある締め切りに「ぎりぎり」間に合いました。

「ぎりぎり」とは、限界に近いことや、余地のないことを表す擬態語で、副詞的にも用いられます。

「ぎり」は、"limit" を意味する名詞「限り」からきていると考えられています。

期限などになんとか間に合ったとき、よく「ぎりぎりセーフ」などと言います。

わずかの差で間に合わなかったときは、「ぎりぎりアウト」などと言うこともあります。
No. 1 Mark D Aardvark's correction
I'm guessing セーフ as safe. It would make sense "barely safe." I would think アウト is "out." This would make sense when thinking of baseball as safe and out.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)
Yes, as you said, セーフ and アウト come from baseball terms, "safe" and "out."

Kanji (漢字 - "Chinese Character")

Jul 29, 2018 17:49
Kanji

Japanese people often use 'kanji' (漢字), which are characters born in China.

The term kanji is written as "Chinese character" in English.

The literal translation of Chinese characters is 'chūgoku-ji' (中国字), but we call it kanji for some reason.

Kan (漢), which is called "Han" in English, was the second imperial dynasty of China founded in 206 BC.

This dynasty continued for more than 420 years, and it has become one period that represents China.

Because of this, Kan has come to mean China itself, then the term kanji (漢字, literally "Han character") was born.
漢字

日本人は、中国発祥の文字である「漢字」をよく使います。

漢字は英語では "Chinese character" と呼ばれます。

これを直訳すると「中国字」となりますが、なぜか我々は「漢字」と呼びます。

「漢」は、紀元前206年に建国された中国の王朝です。

この王朝は420年以上続き、中国を代表する一つの時代となりました。

このことから、「漢」は「中国の地」を指す名詞ともなり、「漢字」という言葉が生まれたそうです。
No. 1 Alejandro's correction
なぜ漢の字に「逞しい」のニュアンスが含まれているのは、いつも不思議と思っていた。というか、今までもわかりません。
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments. :)

> なぜ漢の字に「逞しい」のニュアンスが含まれているのは、いつも不思議と思っていた。
「漢」とうい字は、「男」(men) という意味を持つことと、関係しているかもしれません。
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
もしかして漢字は、元々漢(オトコ)の字と思われた、反面ひらがなは女の字と言われたんです。若しくは単には漢時代で日本は漢字を取り入られた.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

調べてみたら、漢字が日本に伝わったのは紀元後100年~300年頃だそうです。
中国の漢の時代は紀元前206年~紀元後220年なので、一致しますね。

日本では、「カタカナ」を男性用の文字、「ひらがな」を女性用の文字として使用した時代があったそうですね。

Tyhoon No. 12

Jul 28, 2018 22:54
Tyhoon No. 12

It is raining cats and gods.

This is because Typhoon No. 12 is approaching.

Also, I have a terrible headache.

This is because the atmospheric pressure is dropping dramatically due to the approach of the typhoon.

Today I found a website called 'zutool' (頭痛ーる - literally a headache tool), which shows information about atmospheric pressure and the percentage of people who are feeling headaches.

https://zutool.jp/

According to this site, now the atmospheric pressure in Tokyo is significantly lower than usual, and the 86% of users are feeling headache.

I would like to take medicine and stay in bed today.
台風12号

激しい雨が降っています。

台風12号が近づいているからです。

そして私は今、ひどく頭が痛いです。

台風の接近によって、気圧が下がっているからだと考えられます。

私は今日、気圧の情報と頭痛を感じている人の割合を知ることが出来る「頭痛ーる」というサイトを見つけました。

https://zutool.jp/

このサイトによると、現在東京の気圧が大きく下がっており、約86%のユーザーが頭痛を感じています。

今日は薬を飲んで、おとなしくしていようと思います。
No. 1 tony's correction
激しい雨が降っています。
It is raining hard.
It is pouring.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

> It is raining cats and gods.
I am very ashamed of my mistake.

> Why does it matter whether or not people are users of the website?
To tell the truth, probably the website is mainly used by people who have migraines or headaches. Therefore, I thought that it was exaggerated to say "86% of people."
tony
If the website is reporting statistics of how many users of the website say they have headaches, then this makes sense. If the website is reporting how many people can be expected to have headaches when the atmospheric pressure is this low, then "users" doesn't make sense. The atmospheric pressure should be expected to affect people the same way whether or not they use the website.
No. 2 David's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)

> However, if you swap the 'now' and 'at the current time' in the sentences they sound wrong.
I often mistake the positions of adverbs.
I would like to get used to using adverbs.

> It would be my interpretation that you mean that 86% of the site's users who have also identified themselves as being in the Tokyo area were experience headaches. If so, would this work?
Ah, you're right. Actually, I thought that the percentage was for all the users of the site, but it was for the users living in the Tokyo (Shibuya) area. Thank you for pointing it out.

Yamayama (山々 - Mountains)

Jul 27, 2018 23:04
Yamayama

"Yama" (山) means "mountains," and the kanji 々 means a repetition of the last character.

Therefore, 山々 is read as "yamayama," and it means "many mountains" or "mountains in various places."

On the other hand, this term is often used as an adverb.

If you say “~ shitai no wa yamayama daga” (~したいのは山々だが), it means that a feeling that you want to do something is high like mountains, but you cannot do it.

【Example sentences】
Kōkyū na niku wo tabetai no wa yamayama daga, okane ga nai (高級な肉を食べたいのは山々だが、お金が無い - I really want to eat a prime cut of beef, but I am out of money).
山々

「山」は "mountain," 漢字「々」は直前の漢字の繰り返しを意味します。

そのため、「山々」は "many mountains" や "mountains in various places" を意味します。

一方、この言葉は副詞的に使われることも多いです。

「〜したいのは山々だが」のように使い、何かをしたい気持ちが山のように高いが、実際にはできないということを意味します。

【例文】
高級な肉を食べたいのは山々だが、お金がない。
No. 1 rain's correction
These are all correct! Apart from that, I've also learned a lot! :)
No. 2 David's correction
I like your your periodic vignettes about Japanese phrases. They're always interesting.

Gokiburi (ゴキブリ - Cockroach)

Jul 26, 2018 21:51
Gokiburi

Many people don't like 'gokiburi' (ゴキブリ - cockroach).

I talked about 'gokiburi' a few times on Lang-8, but I have never mentioned its etymology.

Originally, 'gokiburi' was called 'goki kaburi' (御器かぶり).

'Goki' (御器) means "eating utensils," and 'kaburi' (かぶり) means "to wear" or "to gnaw."

There are two major theories about the etymology of 'gokikaburi'; One is that the state of being hiding under eating utensils looked as if they were wearing dishes, and the other is that they gnawed not only food but also eating utensils.
ゴキブリ

「ゴキブリ」は、多くの人間から嫌われています。

私は Lang-8 で何度かゴキブリの話題を出しましたが、その語源については触れてきませんでした。

「ゴキブリ」はもともと、「御器かぶり」と言われていました。

「御器」は "eating utensils," 「かぶり」は "to wear" もしくは "to gnaw" を意味します。

「御器かぶり」の語源には、食器の隙間に隠れて食器をかぶったようであるからという説や、食べ物だけでなく食器にもかぶりつくからという説があります。
No. 1 Alejandro's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post. :)
No. 2 David's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)
Actually, I use single quotes for one word because a Lang-8 user told me to do so. But I would like to use mainly double quotes from now on. :)
David
Toru san,

I use double quotes because that's they I was taught. Apparently there are differences - surprise, surprise - between American and British usage.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/lexicon_valley/2014/10/21/single_quotes_or_double_quotes_it_s_really_quite_simple.html

-------------------------------
If you are an American, using quotation marks could hardly be simpler: Use double quotation marks at all times unless quoting something within a quotation, when you use single. It's different in the greater Anglosphere, where they generally use singles in books and doubles in newspapers. It's still pretty simple, but nothing so straightforward as here.
-------------------------------

However, on second thought, both you and I really aren't quoting something that somebody else said or wrote. We are trying to indicate to the reader that a certain word or words are not simply another part of our sentence the sentence, rather we are referring to the word itself. I think my use of double quotes is wrong.

I found this reference that offers a suggestion:

https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/single-quotation-marks-versus-double-quotation-marks?page=1

-------------------------------
Use Single Quotation Marks to Highlight Words Not Being Used for Their Meaning

It's the convention in certain disciplines such as philosophy, theology, and linguistics to highlight words with special meaning by using single quotation marks instead of double quotation marks.
-------------------------------

In the future I'm going to follow that convention. I will consistently use single quotes around a word, or words, when I want to indicate that I'm referring to the words themselves rather than just using the words as part of the sentence.

I know that single quotes are often used on the internet because the ability to italicize text is often unavailable to the person writing the text.

There is another practice used in technical writing that new or technical terms as well as key terms are often italicized when they are introduced.

http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2015/04/using-italics-for-technical-or-key-terms.html

Note that there is a standard convention used that I very much agree with:
--------------------------------
tl;dr

Use italics for the first case of a new or technical term, a key term, or a label. Don’t italicize the subsequent appearances of new or technical terms or key terms.
---------------------------------

Based on my research here are the rules I'm going to follow when posting in lang-8:

1. The first time I use a:

- word, or series of words, to indicate that I'm referring to the word(s) themselves and not just simply using the words as part of my sentence
- new technical term, key term, or a label

I will surround it with single quotes. The first time... hint, hint Toru ;o)

2. If I use a word or phrase written in another language, assuming it's written in a Roman/Latin alphabet, the first time I write it I'll surround it in single quotes. On subsequent use I may or may not surround it in single quotes. This is a judgement issue. If I feel that the phrase in a foreign language could be mistaken for it's English counterpart I'll continue to surround it in single quotes.

3. If the word, or phrase, is written using A SCRIPT THAT COULD NOT EVER be mistaken for English, I'm looking at you Toru ;o), I won't write it in quotes.

So, based on those rules, here's how I'd write one of your entries:

Many people don't like 'gokiburi' (ゴキブリ - cockroach).
Many people don't like 'gokiburi' (ゴキブリ - cockroach).

I talked about 'gokiburi' a few times on Lang-8, but I have never mentioned its etymology.
I've talked about gokiburi a few times on Lang-8, but I have never mentioned its etymology.

Originally, 'gokiburi' was called 'goki kaburi' (御器かぶり).
Originally, gokiburi was called 'goki kaburi' (御器かぶり).

'Goki' (御器) means "eating utensils," and 'kaburi' (かぶり) means "to wear" or "to gnaw."
Goki (御器) means 'eating utensils,' and kaburi (かぶり) means 'to wear' or 'to gnaw.'

I feel that avoiding all the quoting makes the text more readable.

Toru, By the way, I with draw my suggestion to use 'cockroaches' instead of 'cockroach.' I was curious and found that Japanese doesn't really have a plural form.

So, what do you think about this overly long comment? ;o)

Dave
David
Based on you 山 々 post I I made a mistake in my rules.

'Goki' (御器) means "eating utensils," and 'kaburi' (かぶり) means "to wear" or "to gnaw."
Goki (御器) means "eating utensils,"' and kaburi (かぶり) means "to wear" or"'to gnaw."'

You're original use of double quotes was correct because they are surround words that are effectively quotes. ;o)
Toru
Thank you so much for the helpful comments.
Probably I understand the rules.

I used single quotes instead of italics for Japanese terms written in a Roman alphabet, but I didn't know that the styles are usually used only when it comes out the first time.

I learned something new, thank you. :)

> I with draw my suggestion to use 'cockroaches' instead of 'cockroach.' I was curious and found that Japanese doesn't really have a plural form.
Actually, I understood the 'cockroach' is a countable noun. Maybe I should have used double quotes for it.
>> Many people don't like 'gokiburi' (ゴキブリ - cockroach).
Here, I wanted to say that 'gokiburi,' which means "cockroach." I think that articles are not necessary in such a case because Wikipedia entries don't use articles in similar cases.
David
You're right, an article is not need in your example. With rare exception you only need to worry about using articles if you're writing sentences, right?

You do know that in most cases just about anybody, and their dog, can write and make changes to Wikipedia. Some have better writing skills than others. I'm sure that your skills are better than many. ;o)

Yes,cockroach is a countable noun in English. However, isn't ゴキブリ by itself effectively singular? That's my current understanding .

Double quotes are for surrounding a quote.
Toru
Thank you for your comments. :)

> However, isn't ゴキブリ by itself effectively singular?
It is a little difficult question.
Japanese nouns don't have a plural form, but they can mean either singular or plural according to the context.

For example,
ゴキブリを見た。
This probably means "I saw a cockroach."

家にゴキブリが住んでいる。
This probably means "Cockroaches live in my house."

Akaten (赤点 - Failing Grade)

Jul 25, 2018 20:50
Akaten

Have you ever gotten an 'akaten' (赤点) on an exam?

Since 'aka' (赤) means 'red' and 'ten' (点) means 'score,' the literal meaning of 'akaten' is "red score."

In Japanese schools, if students got a failing grade on a test, the score would be written in red in the grades table.

Because of this, 'akaten' (赤点 - literally "red score") came to mean "failing grade."

The specific score for 'akaten' depends on the school.

In most Japanese university exams, 60 points or less out of 100 points will be 'akaten.'
赤点

あなたはテストで「赤点」をとったことがありますか?

「赤」は 'red,' 「点」は 'score' を意味します。

日本の学校では、テストなどで進級に満たない点数、すなわち落第点をとると、成績表でその部分が赤字で書かれていました。

このことから、「赤点」は「落第点」を意味するようになりました。

具体的に何点以下で赤点になるかは、学校によります。

大学では60点未満であると赤点となることが多いようです。
No. 1 chibi-lang's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)

Natsubate (夏バテ - Summer Lethargy)

Jul 24, 2018 23:40
Natsubate

The hot humid weather has continued lately.

Please be careful not to become a state called 'natsubate' (夏バテ).

'Natsubate' is the combined word made of the noun 'natsu' (夏 - summer) and the verb 'bateru' (バテる - being exhausted).

That is to say, this word means that your physical condition worsens due to the summer heat.

Incidentally, 'bate bate' (バテバテ) is an onomatopoeia that represents tiredness, which is made by repeating the 'bate' (バテ) in the verb 'bateru' (バテる).
夏バテ

最近とても蒸し暑いです。

「夏バテ」しないように気を付けてください。

「夏バテ」は、'summer' を意味する「夏」と 'exhausted' を意味する「バテる」を組み合わせてできた言葉です。

すなわちこの言葉は、夏の暑さが原因で体調を崩してしまうことを意味します。

ちなみに、「バテる」の「バテ」を繰り返して「バテバテ」と言うと、疲れを意味する擬態語になります。
No. 1 weeniemon's correction
I've been experiencing Natsu-bate and was wondering where the word comes from.
This answers all my questions! Thank you so much.
Toru
Thank you for the comment.
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)
No. 2 Zero's correction
おもしろい!聞いたことがないですね。参考になりました。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
ありがとうございます。:)

Jama (邪魔 - Hindrance)

Jul 23, 2018 17:38
In the area where I live, some people park their cars on a street, though it is prohibited by law.

Such cars are called 'jama' (邪魔) in Japanese.

'Jama' means hindering things, or to hinder something.

Since 'ja' (邪) means 'evil' or 'malevolent' and 'ma' (魔) means 'devil,' the literal meaning of 'jama' is 'evil devil.'

Originally, this term referred to a devil who hinders Buddhist ascetic practices.

It is now used in everyday conversation.

Incidentally, there are other English words that correspond to 'jama' (邪魔): 'interference,' 'obstruction,' 'hamper,' etc.
邪魔

私が住む地域では、禁止されているにも関わらず、路上駐車をする人がいます。

そのような車は「邪魔」です。

「邪魔」とは、何かの妨げとなるものや、何かを妨げることを意味します。

「邪」は 'evil' や 'malevolent,' 「魔」は 'devil' を意味するので、「邪魔」の文字通りの意味は "evil devil" となります。

もともとこの言葉は、仏教において修行を妨げる悪魔を指すものでした。

今では日常会話で使われます。

「邪魔」に相当する英単語としては、他にも 'interference' や 'obstruction' などがあります。
No. 1 aussiekevin's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

Choromakasu (ちょろまかす - Sneaking)

Jul 22, 2018 15:37
Choromakasu

To steal something surreptitiously or to cheat on someone's money is called 'choromakasu' (ちょろまかす) in Japanese.

There are two major theories about the etymology of this term.

One is that it was made by combining two words: 'choro' (ちょろ), meaning to be quick, and 'makasu' (まかす), which is short for 'gomakasu' (ごまかす - covering up).

The other one is related to small boats used in the Edo period.

These small boats were called 'choro' (ちょろ). Also, 'makasu' (負かす) means to defeat something. That is to say, 'choromakasu' could originally to imply that someone is quick enough to defeat 'choro.'
ちょろまかす

人の目をごまかして何かを盗むことや、金銭などをごまかすことを、「ちょろまかす」と言います。

この言葉の語源は、大きく2つの説があります。

一つは、「素早いさま」を表す「ちょろ」に、「ごまかす」の「まかす」を繋げて「ちょろまかす」となったというものです。

もう一つは、江戸時代に使われた小型の船に関係したものです。

この小型で速い船は「ちょろ」と呼ばれ、この「ちょろ」を「負かす」ほど早く動くという意味で「ちょろまかす」というわけです。
No. 1 David's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

> To cheat someone out of money?
Probably it means something like that, but the expression may be too strong.
My dictionary also says 「人のお金をごまかす」 is "to play with someone's money."

Hatena Māku (はてなマーク - Question Mark)

Jul 21, 2018 13:30
Hatena Māku

I told you that the exclamation mark '!' is called "bikkuri māku" (びっくりマーク) in Japan.

Similarly, the question mark is called "hatena māku" (はてなマーク).

The term 'hatena' (はてな) can be divided into two words: 'hate' (はて) and 'na' (な).

'Hate' (はて) is an interjection that is used when you are wondering or suspecting something, and 'na' (な) is an interjectional particle that emphasizes the previous word.

However, note that both 'bikkuri' and 'hatena' are casual and slang expressions.
はてなマーク

昨日は、感嘆符 "!" を「びっくりマーク」と呼ぶということを説明しました。

同様に、疑問符 "?" は、「はてなマーク」と呼ばれることがあります。

「はてな」は、「はて」に「な」に分けることができます。

「はて」は、何か不思議に思うときや怪しむときに発する間投詞で、「な」はそれを強調する間投助詞です。

「びっくり」も「はてな」も、口語的かつ俗語的な表現であることに注意してください。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
excellent
Toru
Thank you for reading my post. :)

Bikkuri (びっくり- Surprise)

Jul 20, 2018 16:02
There are a lot of 'surprises' in our life.

In Japan, surprises are referred to as 'bikkuri' (びっくり) in spoken language.

This term was derived from the onomatopoeia 'biku' (びく), which represents a slight movement.

Since your body would move slightly when you are surprised, 'bikkuri' has come to mean 'surprises.'

There is another onomatopoeia that represents a light movement, 'pikuri' (ぴくり), but we never say 'pikkuri' (ぴっくり).

Incidentally, the exclamation mark '!' is called "bikkuri māku" (びっくりマーク) in Japan.
びっくり

世の中にはさまざまな「びっくり」があります。

「びっくり」とは、突然のことや意外なことに驚くことを意味する言葉です。

この言葉は、わずかな動きを表す擬態語「びく」から派生したものです。

驚くとき、体が一瞬動くことから、「びっくり」は「驚くこと」を意味するようになりました。

何かがわずかに動くことを表す擬態語「ぴくり」もありますが、「ぴっくり」とは言いません。

ちなみに、感嘆符の「!」は、「びっくりマーク」とも呼ばれます。
No. 1 Crid1968's correction
Interesting post, and I can't see anything to correct. Thank you for posting.
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post. :)

Ukkari (うっかり - Carelessly)

Jul 19, 2018 21:17
Ukkari

Several days ago, I 'ukkari' (うっかり) made a mistake.

'Ukkari' is a Japanese adverb that represents that someone is careless and distracted.

'Ukkari' was originally called 'ukari' (浮かり), and it seemed to come from the verb 'uku' (浮く), which means to float.

That is to say, it implies a state that one's heart is floating.

I heard that in the past 'ukkari' could represent that someone would be fascinated with a beautiful thing, but now it is mostly used to mean a mistake due to carelessness or distraction.
うっかり

私は先日、「うっかり」ミスをしてしまいました。

「うっかり」とは、ぼんやりして注意が散漫になるさまをあらわす副詞です。

もともとは「浮かり」といい、「浮く」からきたと考えられています。

「心が浮いているような状態」を表しているというわけです。

かつては「美しいものに心を奪われてうっとりするさま」も表していたようですが、現在ではほとんど「ぼんやりして失敗するさま」を表す際に使われます。
No. 1 JohnD's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)
No. 2 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post. :)

Himojī (ひもじい - Hungry)

Jul 18, 2018 23:17
If you are hungry and painful, you can express the feeling by using the Japanese 'himojī' (ひもじい).

In the past in Japan, people thought that 'hizō' (脾臓 - spleen) became sluggish when they were hungry.

Because of this, people call the feeling of hungry 'hidarui' (ひだるい), which was made by combining two wrods: 'hizō' (脾臓 - spleen) and 'darui' (だるい - sluggish).

However, since to be hungry was shameful, people said 'himoji' (ひ文字 - hi character) as a code word of 'hidarui.'

Later, 'himoji' became the adjective 'himojī.'
ひもじい

お腹が空いてつらいことを、日本語で「ひもじい」と言います。

かつて日本では、お腹が空くと脾臓がだるくなるものと考えられていました。

このことから、「お腹が空くこと」を、「脾臓がだるい」という意味で「ひだるい」と言っていました。

しかし、空腹であることは恥ずかしいことであったため、「ひだるい」の代わりに「ひ文字」が隠語として使われたそうです。

後に、「ひ文字」が形容詞化して「ひもじい」となりました。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
テラ面白い!

Have you heard of the slang term "hangry"? It's a combination of "hungry" and "angry", when you're so hungry you start to get mad.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)

I didn't know the slang term, thank you for letting me know that. Such a coined term is very interesting!
No. 2 David's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post. :)

Kahō wa Nete Mate (果報は寝て待て - Everything Comes to Those who Wait)

Jul 17, 2018 20:33
Kahō wa Nete Mate

A Japanese TV show conducted an interesting survey related to Japanese proverbs.

The targets are Japanese people over 80 years old, and the question is "What is the proverb that you don't believe?"

The first place proverb was "kahō wa nete mate" (果報は寝て待て).

'Kahō' (果報) means 'happiness' or 'compensation,' 'nete' (寝て) means 'to sleep,' and 'mate' (待て) means 'to wait.'

That is to say, this proverb means that happiness will come if you wait comfortably (after doing what you should do).

Note that it doesn't mean that happiness will come if you are lazy.

The reason why this proverb wasn't believed might be that many Japanese people thought that it would mean the latter.
果報は寝て待て

日本のあるテレビ番組で、ことわざに関する興味深い調査が行われました。

それは、80歳以上の方々に、嘘だと思うことわざは何かを尋ねるというものです。

一位は、「果報は寝て待て」でした。

「果報」は 'happiness' や 'compensation,' 「寝て」は 'to sleep,' そして「待て」は 'to wait' を意味します。

すなわちこのことわざは、「(すべきことをした後は、)焦らず待っていればいずれ幸福が訪れる」ということを意味します。

「寝たり怠けたりしていれば幸福がやってくる」という意味ではないので注意して下さい。

多くの日本人が後者の意味だと勘違いしているため、「嘘」だと思われてしまったのかもしれません。
No. 1 Joms's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections. :)
Joms
Welcome :)
No. 2 artboy598's correction
面白いです。質問があります。どうして「待って」ではなく、「待て」なのですか?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction. :)
「待って」は、「懇願」の意味を含む、カジュアルな表現です (Please wait...)。
「待て」は、命令形です (Wait...)。
ことわざなどでは基本的に、カジュアルな表現は使われません。

Uma ga Au (馬が合う - Compatible)

Jul 16, 2018 16:57
Uma ga Au

Do you have a friend who gets along or a compatible person?

You can use the expression, "uma ga au" (馬が合う), to such a person.

'Uma' (馬) means 'horse' and 'au' (合う) means 'fit' or 'conform.'

In horseback riding, if you want to ride a horse well, you have to conform to the horse.

Because of this, we say "uma ga au" to mean that you get along well with someone or someone is compatible.

You can also say "iki ga au" (息が合う), using 'iki' (息 - breath) instead of 'uma' (馬 - horse).
馬が合う

あなたの周りに、気がよく合う人や、相性が良い人はいますか?

そのような人に対して、あなたは「馬が合う」という表現を使うことができます。

「馬」は 'horse,' 「合う」は '' を意味します。

乗馬では、馬と騎手の息がぴったり合わなければ、うまく乗れません。

このことから、相性が良いことや意気投合することを、「馬が合う」と言うようになりました。

「馬」の代わりに「息」を使って、「息が合う」と言うこともできます。
No. 1 David's correction
This has been a most confusing post for me. I think that this is an example where your Japanese perspective is distinctly different from mine.

I'll send you a message that has a quote from a book that was a revelation to me. I think it provides a perspective on the difference between how Japanese is written vs English.
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post. And sorry for my confusing post.
I tried to write English in my way because Google Translate often misunderstands my Japanese, but the translated sentences might be easier to understand than my English.

Mono Iu Hana (物言う花 - A Beautiful Woman)

Jul 15, 2018 14:28
Mono Iu Hana

The Japanese word, 'Hana' (花 - flower), can be used to imply a beautiful woman.

If you want to mean that it is a woman more explicitly, you can also say "mono iu hana" (物言う花).

Since 'mono' (物) means 'thing' and 'iu' (言う) means 'to say,' the literal meaning of "mono iu hana" is "a flower that can say something."

Relative to 'mono iu hana,' you can also refer to just a flower as "mono iwanu hana" (物言わぬ花), the literal meaning of which is "a flower that can't say anything."
物言う花

'Flower' を意味する日本語「花」は、「美人」の隠語としても使われます。

より明示的に「人」であることを表したい場合は、「物言う花」と言うこともあります。

「もの」は 'thing,' 「言う」は 'say' を意味するので、「物言う花」は "a flower that can say something" となります。

「物言う花」に対して、単なる草花のことを「物言わぬ花」と言うこともあります。

Ohana Batake (お花畑 - A Field of Flowers)

Jul 14, 2018 20:35
"A field of flowers" is translated into Japanese as "hana batake" (花畑) or "ohana batake" (お花畑).

'O' (お) is the polite prefix, 'hana' (花) means 'flower,' and 'batake/hatake' (畑) means 'field.'

This term, "ohana batake," is sometimes used as the following by combining with 'nounai' (脳内 - inside one's brain) or "atama no naka" (頭の中 - inside one's head).

"Ano hito no nounai wa ohana batake da" (あの人の脳内はお花畑だ - Inside of his/her brain is a field of flowers).

Here, this phrase implies that the person is carefree, superficial, or blind.
お花畑

"A field of flowers" を日本語に訳すと、「花畑」もしくは「お花畑」となります。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「花」は 'flower,' 「畑」は 'field' を意味します。

この「お花畑」という言葉は、「脳内」や「頭の中」という言葉と組み合わせて、以下のように使われることがあります。

「あの人の脳内はお花畑だ。」

このとき、能天気な人、考えが浅い人、幻想を妄信している人などを揶揄する表現となります。
No. 1 tryceattack's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)

Ohana (お花 - One's Favorite)

Jul 13, 2018 21:49
Previously, I introduced you to the phrase "ohana tsumi ni iku" (お花摘みに行く - I will go picking flowers) as a code word to mean that you have to go to the bathroom.

Besides, I found that the 'ohana' (お花 - flower) itself is sometimes used as a code word among girls to mean one's favorite.

The kanji, 'hana' (花), can be divided into three parts: '艹' 'イ,' and 'ヒ.'

Here, by tilting '艹,' it becomes like 'キ.'

Furthermore, by rearranging these three characters, it becomes 'ヒイキ,' which means one's favorite.

This is the reason that 'ohana' (お花 - flower) means 'hiiki' (ヒイキ - one's favorite).

【Example sentence】
"Ano ko wa, sensei no ohana yo" (あの子は先生のお花よ - She is the teacher's favorite.)
お花

以前私は、女性がトイレに行くことの隠語として「お花摘みに行く」という言葉を紹介しました。

そして今日私は、「お花」自体が女子学生の間で「贔屓」の隠語として使われることがあるということを知りました。

「花」という漢字は、「サ」「イ」「ヒ」の3つに分けることができます。

「サ」を傾けると「キ」になります。

そして3つの文字を並び替えると「ヒイキ」になります。

これが、「お花」が「贔屓」を意味する理由だそうです。

【使用例】
「あの子は、先生のお花よ」
No. 1 Eleni's correction
Really interesting entry! My only comment is a slightly subtle point that has more to do with implied meaning than with grammar.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
> Ideally, you would write a sentence that more clearly indicates when in time you learned this alternate meeting of the word.
I will try to write that in the days ahead. By the way, I learned the code word when searching for the yesterday's topic.
Eleni
Ah, understood. In that case, one option for a transition would be as follows: "I recently discovered another slang term which uses 'ohana' in a different way:..." Very often in English, following a narrative continuity is quicker and easier for people to understand than a thematic continuity. Even academic or journalistic writing which is explicitly about themes and the meanings of things will often be delivered in terms of a narrative. This is why you so often see narrative nonfiction, where the journalist will give the chronology of their discovery process. I get the sense that this tendency is more overwhelming in English than in Japanese nonfiction writing, but maybe I'm totally mistaken about that?
Toru
I'm sorry, it was difficult for me to understand the difference between a narrative continuity and a thematic continuity. But I think that probably the narrative continuity tends to be used more in English than in Japanese.
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Gyūjiru (牛耳る - Dominating)

Jul 12, 2018 20:34
Gyūjiru

When someone controls an organization or a community as he/her want, we refer to the action as 'gyūjiru' (牛耳る).

'Gyū' (牛) means 'cow' or 'bull,' 'ji' (耳) means 'ear,' and 'ru' (る) is the suffix which can verbalize a noun.

In the past in China, when lords joined in an alliance, the leader took/cut cow's ear, and the lords licked the blood to swear loyalty.

Because of this, to be a leader of an alliance came to be called "gyūji wo toru" (牛耳を執る - taking a cor's ear), and it later also came to mean to control/dominate an organization or a community.

These days, it is usually used as 'gyūjiru' for short.
牛耳る

組織や団体を思い通りに動かすことを、「牛耳る」と言います。

「牛」は 'cow' や 'bull,' 「耳」は 'ear,' そして「る」は名詞を動詞化するはたらきを持つ言葉です。

かつて中国では、諸侯が同盟を結ぶ際、盟主が牛の耳を執り、その血をすすり合って忠誠を誓ったそうです。

このことから同盟における盟主となることを「牛耳を執る」をいうようになり、さらには「組織や団体を思い通りに動かす」ことを意味するようになりました。

現在では、省略して「牛耳る」と使われることが多いです。
No. 1 Yukinekorin's correction
Interesting... Do they really cut a ear off a poor cow? :(
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Since it is a story of 770 BC, the fact may be uncertain.
Yukinekorin
Always my pleasure. I see. I'm just glad people do not have to lick the blood off a cut ear of a poor innocent cow in this present era, haha. xD
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 3 いっ君's correction
「RepublicansはHouseとSenateを牛耳っている」を言えますか?
Toru
政治の話題では「牛耳る」という表現がよく使われます。

House も Senate も過半数が Republicans なので、牛耳っていると言えますね。
いっ君
教えてくれてありがとう!

Gū no Ne mo Denai (ぐうの音も出ない)

Jul 11, 2018 21:31
Have you ever gotten into a situation where you cannot counter someone's argument at all?

Such a situation is called "gū no ne mo denai" (ぐうの音も出ない) in Japanese.

'Gū' (ぐう) is an onomatopoeia that refers to your choking voice, 'ne' (音) means 'sound,' and 'denai' (出ない) means 'not come out.'

That is to say, "gū no ne mo denai" implies that you are getting into a severe situation where you cannot make even your choking voice.

Incidentally, note that "gū no ne" is only used in the expression "gū no ne mo denai."
ぐうの音も出ない

議論などで、全く反論や弁解できないができない状況に陥ったことはありますか?

そのようなようすを、日本語で「ぐうの音も出ない」と言います。

「ぐう」は息が詰まった時の声、「音」は 'sound,' そして「出ない」は 'not come out' を意味します。

すなわち「ぐうの音も出ない」は、息が詰まった時の声さえも出ないほどやり込められている状況を表します。

「ぐうの音」という言葉は、「出ない」という否定語と合わせて「ぐうの音も出ない」という形でしか使われません。
No. 1 tuken's correction
That's quite interesting! Thanks for teaching me this phrase.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Shōdō-gai (衝動買い - Impulse Buying)

Jul 10, 2018 16:29
Today I ordered a BlackBerry KEY2 at an overseas online shopping site.

These days, I often perform an action called 'shōdō-gai' (衝動買い).

Since 'shōdō' (衝動) means 'impulse' and 'gai' (買い) means 'to buy,' the literal meaning of 'shōdō-gai' is "to buy something on impulse."

As these words suggest, this term means to buy something on impulse without thinking deeply whether or not it is truly necessary.

Fatigue might dull my thought.

I need to cut corners to save money for a while.

However, today Microsoft announced the attractive product, Surface Go...
衝動買い

私は今日、海外の通販サイトで BlackBerry の Key2 を注文しました。

最近私はよく「衝動買い」をしてしまいます。

「衝動」は 'impulse,' 「買い」は 'to buy' を意味するので、「衝動買い」の文字通りの意味は "to buy something on impulse" です。

この言葉は文字の示すとおり、本当に必要かどうかを深く考えず、一時の欲望で衝動的に何かを買うことを意味します。

疲れが溜まって思考が鈍くなっているのかもしれません。

しばらくの間は節約しようと思います。

しかし今日、Surface Go という魅力的な製品が発表されてしまいました・・・。

Gata ga Kuru (ガタがくる - Showing One's Age)

Jul 9, 2018 18:17
Gata ga Kuru

As I get older, it became difficult to stay up all night.

If your body condition gets worse due to the age, it is expressed as "gata ga kuru" (ガタがくる) in Japanese.

'Gata' (ガタ) comes from the Buddhist term, 'gatapishi/gatahisi' (我他彼此).

'Ga' (我) means 'oneself,' 'ta' (他) means 'other,' 'pi/hi' (彼) means 'that,' 'shi' (此) means 'this,' and the combination means that people/things conflict each other and trouble continues.

Also, 'kuru' (来る) means 'come,' so "gata ga kuru" (ガタがくる - continuing trouble comes) means that a condition of people or things gets worse with age.
ガタがくる

私は最近年をとったせいか、徹夜をするととてもつかれるようになりました。

このように、年をとって体の調子が悪くなることを、「ガタがくる」と言います。

「ガタ」は、仏教用語の「我他彼此(がたぴし/がたひし)」から来ています。

「我」は 'oneself,' 「他」は 'other,' 「彼」は 'that,' 「此」は 'this' を意味し、「我他彼此」は、物事が対立してもめごとが絶えないことを意味します。

そのような絶えないもめごとがやって来るということから、「ガタがくる」は「人や物の調子が悪くなること」を意味するというわけです。
No. 1 Jordan's correction
Interesting.In English, we might say "showing your age" or "showing my age".

Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)
No. 2 Fifi's correction
No need to stay up all night at any age. Take it easy!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and comment! :)

Muda (無駄 - Waste)

Jul 8, 2018 20:54
Muda

I worked more than three days in a row, without returning home.

And today, when I came back to my apartment, I noticed that my room was very cool and comfortable.

Yes, the air conditioner was on for three days...

I was full of grief.

What you do not need or useless things like this situation is referred to as 'muda' (無駄) in Japanese.

【Example】
・Denkidai wo muda ni shita (電気代を無駄にした - I wasted the electricity expense).

I'm sorry today's post is almost a diary.
無駄

私はここ3日間以上、家に帰らず仕事をしていました。

そして今日、自分のアパートに戻ると、とても涼しいことに気が付きました。

エアコンがつけっぱなしだったのです。

とても切ない気分になりました。

このように無益なことや役に立たないことを、日本語で「無駄」と言います。

【例】
・電気代を無駄にした。

今日はほとんど日記でごめんなさい。
No. 1 Danzabarr's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
I learned something new. :)
No. 2 David's correction
David
I forgot to mention that "grief" can be used that way in a casual conversation.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
Yes, I tried to write this post casually. :)

Baby Talk

Jul 7, 2018 18:30
The Japanese language has various phrases in baby talk.

Most of them were made by imitating sounds of something or using only sounds that are easy to pronounce even for infants.

Below are some example phrases in baby talk; please try to guess what they mean.

・Manma (マンマ)
・Jīji (ジージ)
・Bāba (バーバ)
・Shīshi (シーシー)
・An-yo (あんよ)

【Answer】
・Manma ・・・ 'Meal.'
・Jīji ・・・ 'Grandfather.'
・Bāba ・・・ 'Grandmother.'
・Shīshi ・・・ 'Urination' or 'pee.'
・An-yo ・・・ 'Foot' or 'walking.'
幼児語

日本にはさまざまな幼児語が存在します。

その多くは、対象が発する音を真似たものや、幼児でも発音しやすい音のみを使ったものとなります。

以下に幾つか幼児語の例を書くので、何を意味するか推測してみて下さい。

・マンマ
・ジージ
・バーバ
・シーシー(チッチ)
・あんよ

【答え】
「マンマ」・・・ごはん
「ジージ」・・・祖父
「バーバ」・・・祖母
「シーシー(チッチ)」・・・排尿
「あんよ」・・・足、歩くこと
No. 1 スイちゃん's correction
サ行がタ行になってしまうのも幼児語の特徴ですね。
子供が幼児語を使うのが可愛いけれど、大人がそれを使ったらちょっと見苦しいかもしれませんね(笑)
ちなみに、中国語の幼児語のパータンは同じ言葉を2回繰り返す。例えば車が「車車」で、犬が「狗狗」です。
Toru
そうですね、大人同士の会話で使われていたら恐怖です(笑)
中国語の面白い情報、ありがとうございます!
簡単な言葉を2回繰り返すのは、確かに子どもらしいですね。
No. 2 みき's correction
Great job! This was really fun to read. I didn't know manma or anyo! Thank you for the interesting topic!! ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Baby Talk to Represent Animals

Jul 6, 2018 19:48
In a conversation with babies in Japan, we can represent animals by their barks or cries.

Yesterday, I told you that "wan wan" (ワンワン) and "nyan nyan" (ニャンニャン) represent 'dog' and 'cat,' respectively.

In addition to that, there are several common expressions as the following:

Mō mō (モーモー) ・・・ 'cow' or 'bull.'

Poppo (ポッポ) ・・・ 'pigeon.'

Kokko (コッコ) ・・・'chicken.'

Bū bū (ブーブー) ・・・ 'pig.'

However, note that "bū bū" also means the sound of a car and the car itself.

I will talk about other baby talks tomorrow.
動物を表す幼児語

日本における幼児との会話では、動物の鳴き声によってその動物を表すことがあります。

昨日は、「ワンワン」が犬、「ニャンニャン」が猫を表すことを紹介しました。

その他にもよく使われるものとしては、次のようなものがあります。

モーモー・・・牛

ポッポ・・・ハト

コッコ・・・ニワトリ

ブーブー・・・豚

ただし、「ブーブー」は車が発する音として、「車」を指すことも多いです。

明日は動物以外の幼児語を紹介しようと思います。
No. 1 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Wan Wan and Nyan Nyan (ワンワンとニャンニャン- Doggie and Kitty)

Jul 5, 2018 19:48
I would like to write about cats and dogs continuing from yesterday.

In Japan, a dog bark is represented as "wan wan" (ワンワン), and a cat's cry is represented as "nyan nyan" (ニャンニャン).

These terms are used not only as cries but also as baby words that refer the animal itself.

That is to say, "wan wan" and "nyan nyan" can mean 'dog' and 'cat,' respectively.

I think that these words correspond to 'doggie,' 'kitty,' or 'meow' in English.

However, please note that somehow 'nyan nyan' sometimes mean sexual activity.
ワンワンとニャンニャン

今日は昨日に引き続き、犬と猫の話題です。

日本で犬の鳴き声は「ワンワン」、猫の鳴き声は「ニャンニャン」です。

これらは単に鳴き声だけでなく、その動物を指す幼児語として使われることがあります。

すなわち「ワンワン」は犬、「ニャンニャン」は猫というわけです。

これらは英語での 'doggie,' 'kitty,' 'meow' に相当すると思います。

ただし、どういうわけか「ニャンニャン」は性行為を表すことがあるので、注意が必要です。
No. 1 mikage893's correction
Interesting article.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!

> How would you use ’nyan nyan’ in a sentence for sexual activity? Could you give an example sentence? 例文
When expressing the meaning, it is usually used with the verb 'suru' (する - do), for example, "nyan nyan suru" (ニャンニャンする).

Example:
Kanojo to nyan nyan shita (彼女とニャンニャンした - I made love to my girlfriend).
No. 2 Trav's correction
Hi Toru! This post reminded me of another English words for cat, 'pussy' or 'pussy cat.' 'Pussy' can also be used as vulgar slang for a women's genitals or for someone who is weak or cowardly.
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
It's very interesting that both English and Japanese have the word linking cats and women. :)

Wanko and Nyanko (「わんこ」と「にゃんこ」 - Puppies and Kittens)

Jul 4, 2018 18:35
In my post yesterday, I told you that we sometimes call a puppy or a cute dog 'wanchan' (わんちゃん).

This word was made by adding the suffix 'chan' (ちゃん), which is used when calling something with familiarity, to a dog's bark 'wan' (わん).

In addition to 'chan,' you can choose another suffix 'ko' (こ), which expresses familiarity -- it becomes 'wanko' (わんこ).

Furthermore, if you want to refer to a kitten or a cute cat, you can say 'nyanko' (にゃんこ); here, the 'nyan' (にゃん) is a cry of a cat.

However, for some reason, people rarely say 'nyanchan' (にゃんちゃん).
「わんこ」と「にゃんこ」

昨日の投稿で、子犬やかわいい犬のことを「わんちゃん」と呼ぶことがあると言いました。

これは、犬の鳴き声である「わん」に、親しみを込めて何かを呼ぶときに使う接尾語「ちゃん」をつけた言葉です。

「ちゃん」の他にも、親しみの意を表す接尾語「こ」をつけて、「わんこ」と呼ぶこともできます。

さらには、猫の鳴き声である「にゃん」に「こ」をつけることで、子猫やかわいい猫を表す「にゃんこ」という言葉になります。

しかし、「にゃんちゃん」という表現はあまり聞かない気がします。
No. 1 Trav's correction
Very interesting. I don't think we have the equivalent types of terms for cats and dogs in English. The closest one might be "kitty."
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
Yes, I also think 'kitty' and 'doggie' are close.

Wanchan (ワンチャン - Possibility)

Jul 3, 2018 20:06
I wrote that I couldn't make a deadline for submission of manuscripts yesterday.

However, there seems to be 'wanchan' (ワンチャン).

'Wanchan' comes from the English "one chance," and it means "there is a chance/possibility."

Originally, 'wanchan' was used as a term of mah-jong, but these days young people often use it in various situations.

Incidentally, when we say 'wanchan' as the above meaning, we don't stress it on any syllable.

If you accent the first syllable or write it as ワンちゃん (here, chan is written with Hiragana), it means a puppy or a cute dog.
ワンチャン

昨日私は、原稿の締め切りに間に合わなかったと書きました。

しかし、「ワンチャン」ありそうです。

「ワンチャン」は英語の "one chance" からきており、「可能性がある」「チャンスがある」などの意味を持ちます。

もともと麻雀の用語として使われていたようですが、現在は若者の間でよく使われているのを耳にします。

ちなみに、上述の意味の 'wanchan' (ワンチャン) にはアクセントがありません。

もし 'wa' にアクセントを置いたり、「ワンちゃん」のように「ちゃん」をひらがなで書くと、子犬やかわいい犬を指す言葉になることに注意して下さい。
No. 1 エンジー's correction
面白いです!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 Trav's correction
So it's still possible for you to submit your manuscript? Or was yesterday's deadline the 'wanchan'?

Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
Yes, the deadline has been extended for a while. :)
No. 3 Chris's correction

Shimekiri ni Owareru (締め切りに追われる - Being under a Deadline)

Jul 2, 2018 17:56
Since the deadline for a manuscript of an academic conference was 9 o'clock this morning, I worked through the night.
(Unfortunately, I couldn't make the deadline, and missed an opportunity to visit Italy.)

Doing work desperately like this is often expressed as "shimekiri ni owareru" (締め切りに追われる) in Japanese.

'Shimekiri' (締め切り) means 'deadline' and 'owareru' (追われる) means 'being chased,' so the literal meaning of this phrase is "being chased by a deadline."

As you can guess, we use the verb 'owareru' (追われる - being chased) to imply that the deadline is approaching.

This phrase can be translated into English as "being under a deadline" or "facing the pressure of a deadline."
締め切りに追われる

学会の原稿提出の締め切りが今朝9時だったので、徹夜しました。
(残念ながら間に合わず、イタリアを訪れるチャンスを逃しました・・。)

このように、締め切りの間際に必死に仕事をすることを、よく「締め切りに追われる」と表現します。

「締め切り」は 'deadline,' 「追われる」は 'being chased' を意味するので、「締め切りに追われる」の文字通りの意味は "being chased by a deadline" となります。

「締め切り」という期日がすぐ後ろに迫ってきていることを、「追われる」という動詞で表現しているわけです。

英語では "being under a deadline" や "facing the pressure of a deadline" のように表現されます。
No. 1 beccapamyurin's correction
Interesting!! Shame about Italy!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)
beccapamyurin
You're welcome!
No. 2 Trav's correction
Hi Toru! Here are some other English expressions like 締め切りに追われる:

"struggling to {meet/make} a deadline"
"rushing to {meet/make} a deadline"
"chasing a deadline" <-- This one is really interesting because the person is the "chaser" rather than the one "being chased."
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
And thank you for letting me know these expressions! :)
No. 3 Chris's correction
Barely anything to correct! And thanks for teaching me a new phrase :D
I love reading your posts.
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post!
I'm glad to hear your comment. :)

Hikagemono (日陰者 - An Inconspicuous Person)

Jul 1, 2018 18:50
I introduced you to the words 'hoshikage' (星影 - starlight) and 'tsukikage' (月影 - moonlight) yesterday.

You can also say 'hikage' (日影) to mean 'sunlight,' however, the kanji of 'hikage' is usually 日陰.

Also, if you write 'hikage' as 日陰, it means a place where the sun does not get into, that is, a 'shade.'

Furthermore, the composite term 'hikagemono' (日陰者), which is made by adding 'mono' (者 - person) to 'hikage' (日陰 - shadow), it can mean an inconspicuous person or a person who can't be successful in the world.
日陰者

昨日は「星影」と「月影」という言葉を紹介しました。

「太陽の光」という意味で「日影」と言うこともできますが、「ひかげ」の漢字は通常「日陰」です。

そして「日陰」と書いた場合は、「日の当たらない場所」を意味します。

さらに、「日陰」に人を表す「者」をつけて「日陰者」とすることで、「表立って世に出られない人」や「世に知られず埋もれて立身出世できない人」を意味する言葉となります。
No. 1 Trav's correction
Hi Toru! I see that 日陰者 can also mean 'a person with a shady past' or 'an ex-convict.'

Toru
  • And if you write 'hikage' as 日陰, it means a place that is not hit by sunlight, that is, 'shade.'
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know these terms!

> And if you write...
Actually, some commenters on Lang-8 told me that you should not use 'and' at the beginning of sentences (especially in formal sentences), but should I use 'and' here?
Trav
Hi Toru! Yes, writers often avoid using 'and' at the beginning of a sentence in certain types of formal writing. But it is not grammatically incorrect to use a coordinating conjunction (and, but, etc.) at the beginning of a complete sentence. If you would like to use a more formal expression in this case, I would say 'In addition, if you write....'

Hoshikage (星影)

Jun 30, 2018 20:59
What comes to your mind when you hear 'hoshikage' (星影)?

Hoshi (星) means 'star' and kage (影) means 'shadow.'

Because of this, you (even Japanese people) might think that 'hoshikage' is "a shadow created by the light of a star."

However, the actual meaning of 'hoshikage' is just 'starlight.'

Originally, the word 'kage' meant 'light.'

Later, it came to mean also "a black shape created by the light and an object," and now it is mainly used as the latter meaning.

Incidentally, if you want to say 'moonlight' in Japanese, you can say 'tsukikage' (月影 - here, 'tsuki' means 'moon') in the same manner as the case of 'hoshikage.'
星影

「星影」と聞いて何を思い浮かべますか?

「星」は 'star,' 「影」は一般的に 'shadow' を意味します。

このことから、「星影」と聞いて「星の光によって作り出される影」を想像してしまうかもしれません。

しかし、実は「星影」は「星の光」を意味します。

もともと「影」という言葉は、「光」を意味する言葉でした。

後に、「光が物体に遮られてできる黒い形」のことも「影」と呼ぶようになり、現在では主に 'shadow' の意味になったというわけです。

同様に、「月影」と言うことで「月の光」を表すこともできます。
No. 1 Trav's correction
Hi Toru! It's very interesting to find out the etymology of words. I'll have to check out some of your older posts.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments!
I would be glad if you could enjoy my posts. :)
No. 2 Matt's correction
Interesting as always.
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post! (^^)
No. 3 Fifi's correction
Toru
Ah! What a terrible mistake! Thank you for pointing that out!

Lack of Sleep

Jun 29, 2018 14:36
These days I have trouble getting to sleep.

I think the reason is that I fiddle with my computer and smartphone before going to bed or in bed.

We sleep and wake up on a 24-hour cycle -- this is thanks to 'melatonin,' which is known as a kind of hormones.

During the night, the amount of melatonin secretion increases as it grows dark, and it makes you sleepy.

In the morning, the melatonin secretion is suppressed when exposing to the strong light of the sun, and it causes you to awaken.

Unfortunately, blue lights generated from computers or smartphones suppress the melatonin secretion just like when you are exposed to the sunlight.

If you want to get a good quality sleep, you should not fiddle with computers nor smartphones in an hour before getting to bed.
寝不足

最近、あまり寝付きが良くありません。

原因は、寝る前にパソコンやスマートフォンをいじっているせいだと思います。

我々が24時間周期で睡眠と起床を繰り返すのは、睡眠ホルモンと呼ばれる「メラトニン」のおかげです。

夜、暗くなるとメラトニンの分泌量が増え、眠くなります。

朝、太陽の強い光を浴びるとメラトニンの分泌が抑制され、目が覚めます。

パソコンやスマートフォンから発生するブルーライトは、太陽の光と同様に、メラトニンの分泌を抑制してしまいます。

質の良い睡眠をとるためには、寝る前の1時間はパソコンもスマートフォンも触らないことです。
No. 1 David's correction
David
sigh...

when exposing -> when exposed - Melatonin isn't exposing itself to the sun it is exposed to the sun.

wrong

Melatonin isn't exposing itself to the sun your system/bodl is exposed to the sun.

sorry
David
And one more....


should not fiddle with computers nor smartphones --> should not fiddle with computers or smartphones

https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/when-use-nor?page=1

In all our examples so far, we’ve used “nor” to indicate a negative state that continues after something else negative happens. However, when the second negative item is a noun, adjective, or adverb phrase (4), you should use “or” to continue the negative thought because according to Bryan Garner “the initial negative carries through to all the enumerated elements” (5). For example, when you use the word “not,” the structure “not A or B” is correct. You’d have to say, “He is not interested in math or science”; “He is not interested in math nor science” won’t work. Likewise, “She didn’t speak slowly or clearly” has a better ring to it than “She didn’t speak slowly nor clearly.”When to Use Either “Nor” or “Or”

If, on the other hand, the second part of the negative is a verb phrase—not a verb clause—then you can choose to use “nor” or “or” (6). Both of the following sentences will work: “Santa will not permit naughty behavior or even consider bringing presents.” “Santa will not permit naughty behavior nor even consider bringing presents.” You as the writer get to decide which one sounds better. If you’re unsure which word to use, or if you want to avoid the problem, you can try saying, “and no” for the second part of the negative (7): “I have no time and no money.” The phrase “and not” will also work: “Santa will not permit naughty behavior and will not even consider bringing presents.”


Don't get discouraged with all my comments. Your English is very good. You're at the stage where you don't have to worry so much about being right you're at the stage where you spend the rest of your life making it better. ;o)
Toru
Thank you so much for the helpful corrections!
There are still a lot of things for me to learn.

I have a question. I have no idea the meaning of the word 'insterment;' is it 'instrument' or something?
David
Sigh... and now you're correcting me... you're absolutely correct!

James suggestions are very good and a lot less wordy.
David
Sigh... and now you're correcting me... you're absolutely correct!

James suggestions are very good and a lot less wordy.
David
Sigh... and now you're correcting me... you're absolutely correct!

James suggestions are very good and a lot less wordy.
David
Sigh... and now you're correcting me... you're absolutely correct!

James suggestions are very good and a lot less wordy.
David
Sigh... and now you're correcting me... you're absolutely correct!

James suggestions are very good and a lot less wordy.
No. 2 James's correction
Well, I wasn't aware that the light from computer screens and smartphones were in the same range as daylight.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
Yes, daylight has a wider wavelength width, but the visible light range is the same.

Me and the Foreign Language

Jun 28, 2018 17:13
Today I would like to write my post under the theme of 'me and the foreign language.'

The reason that I study English is closely related to my purpose in life.

I am currently researching diagnostic and measurement technology at my university, and I would like to become a researcher who is active on the front lines of that field.

Toward this goal, two abilities are essential: one is the ability to read scientific papers written in English, and the other is the ability to disseminate study results to the world in English.

Because of this, I learn and write English on Lang-8 every day.

However, these days I have not practiced listening and speaking; undoubtedly, I need more practices towards an international conference that is held after a few months.
私と外国語

今日は「私と外国語」をテーマに、記事を投稿します。

私が英語を学ぶ理由は、私の人生の目的と深く関係しています。

私は現在大学で診断・計測技術に関する研究を行っており、この分野において世界の第一線で活躍する研究者になりたいと思っています。

そのためには、英語で書かれた論文を読む能力と、英語で研究成果を世界に発信する能力が不可欠です。

これら能力を身につけるため、私は毎日 Lang-8 に記事を投稿しています。

しかし、リスニングとスピーキングが疎かになっているので、数か月後に控えた国際会議に向けて特訓しなければなりません。
No. 1 TheCutestOtter's correction
Here you go! Your English is already really good, so my corrections only affect smaller parts of speech which sound a little unnatural to my ears. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to let me know and I'll do what I can to help out.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
I'm glad to hear you say that. (^^)
No. 2 Matt's correction
Have you checked out italki.com for your conversation practice? It's a great site that I have recently been using to practice my Japanese conversation. I have been writing about various topics here to receive help regarding expressions, vocabulary, and grammatical constructions which I then am able to practice orally via Skype with Japanese tutors. It's been great practice for an upcoming phone interview test I have.

Best of luck with your continued efforts!
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
And thank you for letting me know that site! It looks great.
I would like to try using it in the near future!
Matt
Let me know how it goes. Good luck finding some good language partners or tutors.
No. 3 David's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
> You need more practice for what reason?
It is because I don't want to be humiliated at the conference.
David
Humiliation is good for the soul... if you can live through it. ;o)

Anata (あなた - You/Sweetheart)

Jun 27, 2018 21:04
I wrote about Japanese two person pronouns yesterday.

In that post, I said that you should not use two person pronouns blindly, such as anata (あなた) or kimi (君), in daily conversation in Japan.

However, anata (あなた) could be used in a specific case.

That is when a wife refers to her husband.

Originally, anata was a word to refer to something in the distance.

In the Edo period, since wives and husbands in samurai families often acted independently, wives seemed to call their husbands 'anata' in the sense of "a person who is far away."

Someday, I would like someone to tell me "Okaerinasai, anata" (おかえりなさい、あなた - Welcome home, sweetheart), haha.
あなた

昨日は日本語の二人称代名詞について書きました。

その投稿の中で私は、日本語の会話で「あなた」や「君」などの二人称代名詞は基本的に使うべきではないと述べました。

しかし、「あなた」だけは特殊な使われ方をする場合があります。

それは、夫婦間で妻が夫を呼ぶ時です。

もともと「あなた」は、「遠くにあるもの」を指す言葉でした。

江戸時代、武家の夫婦は別行動を取ることが多かったため、「いつも遠くにいる夫」という意味で夫のことを「あなた」と呼ぶようになったそうです。

いつか、「おかえりなさい、あなた」と言われたいものです。
No. 1 Matt's correction
Once again, thank you for the clear explanation!
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post! :)
I learned something new!

Second Person Pronouns

Jun 26, 2018 15:25
It may be very difficult for Japanese learners to treat Japanese second person pronouns.

Second person pronouns are pronouns used when writers/speakers address someone directly; the most common one in English is 'you.'

The Japanese language has 'anata' (あなた) and 'kimi' (君) as typical translations of 'you,' but you should not use them blindly.

In Japan, second person pronouns are basically used only to refer to your friends or lower ranking people.

If you want to refer to someone safely, you can choose several ways: adding 'san' (さん) to one's last name, using one's position name like 'sensei' (先生 - teacher) or 'buchō' (部長 - manager), or not using any second person terms.
二人称代名詞

日本語を学ぶ外国人にとって、二人称代名詞の扱いはとても難しいかもしれません。

二人称代名詞とは、受け手を指す代名詞のことで、英語では 'you' が一般的です。

典型的な 'you' の訳語としては「あなた」や「君」がありますが、気軽に使っていはいけません。

日本において、二人称代名詞は基本的に同格もしくは目下の相手にしか使われず、目上の相手に対しては失礼になってしまうからです。

無難で一般的な相手の呼び方としては、名字に「さん」をつける、「先生」「部長」など役職で呼ぶ、そもそも二人称を省略するなどがあります。
No. 1 lenubis's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
私の日本語の文章を元に添削してくれてありがとうございます!
No. 2 Matt's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and helpful comments! :)
I understand well. I will do my best to improve the coherence of my texts.
Indeed, although I said "several ways," it was odd that one of them was "not using..."
No. 3 artboy598's correction
Thank you! If I am address multiple people, should I just say “mina-san”? What about hypothetical situations? “If the fire spreads you should grab the fire extinguishers”.
Toru
Yes, you should 'mina-san' or 'mina-sama' when you address multiple people. (If these people are your friends or lower ranking people, you can also say 'minna.') In hypothetical situations, in my opinion, it is better/natural to avoid using pronouns. “If the fire spreads you should grab the fire extinguishers” can be translated as "もし火災が発生したら、消化器を使って下さい。"
artboy598
本当にありがとうございます。分かりました!
No. 4 Kiwi's correction
can I say お前さん?
Toru
Yes, you can say お前さん.
However, note that it is used to refer to lower ranking people as with other second person pronouns.

Mokuhyō (目標) and Mokuteki (目的) Part 2

Jun 25, 2018 16:20
Mokuhyō and Mokuteki Part 2

Today I would like to introduce you to the difference between mokuhyō (目標) and mokuteki (目的); even Japanese people often confuse them.

As the word teki (的 - target) indicates, 'mokuteki' is your final goal, and it should be the essential answer to the reason you act.

On the other hand, as the word hyō (標 - mark) indicates, 'mokuhyō' are specific goals/aims/objectives to achieve your final goal.

In summary, 'mokuteki' is your abstract final goal, whereas 'mokuhyō' are specific goals for achievement in the final goal.

For example, my mokuteki in life is to become a researcher who is active in the front lines in the world, and my mokuhyō to achieve this mokuteki are the followings: writing English on Lang-8 every day, reading a paper every week, and submitting a paper to a scientific journal every year.
目標と目的 Part 2

今日は、日本人でも間違える「目標」と「目的」の違いを紹介します。

「目的」は、最終的に目指すゴールのことであり、あなたが行動する理由の本質的な答えです。

一方で「目標」は、「標(目印)」という字が示すように、目的を達成する上での具体的な道しるべです。

まとめると、「目的」は抽象的な最終ゴール、「目標」は具体的な達成項目です。

例えば、私の人生の目的は「世界で活躍する研究者になること」であり、この目的を達成するための目標として「毎日Lang-8に投稿すること」「週に1本は論文を読むこと」「年に1本は論文を投稿すること」などを定めています。
No. 1 pillows's correction
Good
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
No. 2 Matt's correction
You might have started this entry with a reference to yesterday's entry. For those of us who read yesterday's, it would provide that connection, for those who missed it, it would provide a reason to check it out, perhaps.

Agreed with Pillows. Great mokuteki and mokuhyo!
Toru
Thank you so much the corrections and helpful comments!
I would like to be able to handle various English terms and expressions well.

By the way, I divide my post into two parts when I think it might exceed 200 words, haha.

Mokuhyō (目標) and Mokuteki (目的) Part 1

Jun 24, 2018 10:42
Mokuhyō and Mokuteki Part 1

I introduced you to the Japanese word meyasu (目安) yesterday.

Meyasu can mean 'aim,' 'target,' and 'goal,' but this word is rather used to mean 'standard' or 'criterion.'

If you want to mean 'aim,' 'target,' 'goal' or 'objective' explicitly, you can use mokuhyō (目標) or mokuteki (目的).

Here, moku (目) means 'eye,' hyō (標) means 'mark,' and teki (的) means 'target' -- both mokuhyō and mokuteki can be translated as the above-mentioned English words.

However, the usage of these words is different.

I will explain that tomorrow.
目標と目的 Part 1

昨日は「目安」という言葉を紹介しました。

「目安」は 'aim' や 'target,' 'goal' を表すことができますが、どちらかと言うと 'standard' や 'criterion' の意味合いが強いです。

より明示的に 'aim,' 'target,' 'goal,' 'objective' などの意味を表したい場合は、「目標」や「目的」を使います。

「目」は 'eye,' 「標」は 'mark,' 「的」は 'target' を意味し、「目標」と「目的」はどちらも上記のような英単語に訳すことができます。

しかし、「目標」と「目的」の使い方は異なります。

明日はその違いについて説明します。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
If you have time, can you explain “anata” to us in a journal? Sometimes I want to use it, but I don’t want to seem rude. It’s hard for English speakers to know when to use “anata” when speaking and writing. Than you.
artboy598
Thank you.
Toru
Thank you for reading my post and suggesting that!
Okay, I will write about that within several days. :)
No. 2 Matt's correction
What luck! I have been recently contemplating 目標 and 目的. In teaching Japanese in the spring, I didn't know which to use for describing the goals/targets/objectives of our lessons. I tried to keep as much of my talk/writing in Japanese, but I wasn't sure if there was a nuance in usage there. Looking forward to your post!
Toru
Thank you so much for the explanation!
It is beneficial because I was worried about the usage of 'rather.'

I think that your suggestions can convey what I wanted to mean. I also thought about an alternative way of saying; "... but this word tends to be used to mean..." Does it work?

By the way, in my blog, I italicized all Japanese terms, so if it is possible, I would like to emphasize 'can' in bold.
Matt
Sure. Bold can be used for emphasis since italicization is used for foreign text.

"...but this word tends to be used to mean..." is grammatical. It feels a little wordy for a written text, but in conversation I think it would be fine. Actually, I think that was the first phrase that came to my mind for a correction, but I didn't put it because of it's wordy feel. But yes, it definitely works and is perhaps closest to your intended meaning.
Toru
Thank you for your kind explanation!
I understand well. :)

Meyasu (目安 - Rough Standard)

Jun 23, 2018 21:32
I write short English texts every day on Lang-8 while defining 100 words as 'meyasu' (目安).

Meyasu means goals, rough standards, or rough indications.

This word is a noun form of the adjective 'meyasushi' (目安し), which was used in the Heian period.

Me (目) means 'eye' and yasushi (安し) means 'to feel relieved,' so the combination means "to feel relieved to see something" or "something is easy to see."

In the Kamakura period, what you can understand if you see, such as a scale, came to be called meyasu, and it has come to mean its current meanings.
私は毎日、100単語を「目安」にLang-8で記事を投稿しています。

「目安」とは、目標やおおよその基準、おおよその見当などを意味する言葉です。

この言葉は、平安時代に使われていた「目安し」という形容詞が名詞化したものです。

「目」は 'eye,' 「安し」は 'to feel relieved' を意味するので、「目安し」は "to feel relieved to see something" もしくは "something is easy to see" を意味します。

そして鎌倉時代、目盛りなど見てすぐにわかるものを「目安」と呼ぶようになり、現在の「目標」や「基準」などの意味を持つようになりました。
No. 1 Matt's correction
In the case of your Lang-8 writing and 100 definitions meyasu, I think "daily goals/targets" would be the most natural translation.

Related expressions:

go for/aim for/strive for/pursue one's daily goals/targets
hit/make/achieve/surpass one's daily goals/targets
miss/fail to hit one's daily goals/targets

Ex.
I keep a list of my daily language learning goals on my fridge so that I won't forget them. Every day, I try to hit my target of 100 definitions and at least 1 post on Lang-8. Most days, I make my goals, but even when I miss, I'm happy as long as I can make some effort.

目安という言葉が存在するのが初めて知りました。説明がありがたいですね。自分の言語の目安を書いておかなくて、頭にあるだけですけど。だから、はっきり毎日したいことがわかりません。たぶん、基本の目安を書いておけばいいですね。それをヒットしたらベースです。その以外The cherry on topかThe icing on the cakeになるでしょう。
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and your helpful comments!
I learned something new. :)

毎日やるべき仕事量の目安のことを、ノルマ (norm; ロシアからの借用語)と言うことも多いです。
No. 2 nagi's correction
Matt
  • I write short English texts every day on Lang-8 while defining 100 words as with a 'meyasu' (目安) of 100 words.
AH! なるほど。Nagiさん figured out your likely intended meaning. The way it was written originally made it hard for me to figure out and I misinterpreted it. I thought you had 2 tasks: write a passage and define 100 vocabulary words. I may have been reading a little too fast to catch your actual meaning. Your goal is to write a post every day and your goal/aim/target/criterion/metric is to reach 100 words in that post.

Nagi's correction captures this meaning directly and clearly.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!

> Matt-san
Yes, my 目標 is to write a post every day. And the 目安 of the number of words in that post is 100.
Matt
Got it!

Aibou (相棒 - Buddy)

Jun 22, 2018 13:12
Do you have aibou (相棒)?

Aibo means a partner who works or plays with you.

Ai (相) means ‘each other’ and bou (棒) means ‘stick.’

This word came from kago (駕籠), which was used in the Edo period.

Kago is a kind of human-powered vehicle that can carry a human — the sitting space was hung with a single stick, and two people carried it on their shoulders.

The person who carried the front side of the stick was called sakibou (先棒 - front stick), the person who carried the back side was called atobou (後棒 - back stick), and they called each other aibou (相棒 - each other's stick).
相棒

あなたには「相棒」がいますか?

「相棒」とは、一緒に仕事などをする相手や仲間のことを指す言葉です。

「相」は ‘each other,’ 「棒」は 'stick' を意味します。

この言葉は、江戸時代に使われた「駕籠」に由来します。

駕籠は人を乗せて人力で運ぶ乗り物のことで、人が座る部分を一本の棒に吊るし、2人で棒を担いで運びます。

棒の前の方を担ぐ人を先棒、後ろの方を担ぐ人を後棒と言い、彼らはお互いのことを「相棒」と呼び合っていたそうです。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
教えてくれてありがとうございます。実は子供の頃に「遊戯王」というアニメこの言葉を学びましたが、語源は知りませんでした!

ところで、このイベントに参加できますか?(添削しなくてもいい)

lang-8.com/166175/journals/210088543882327226274302635329813513262
Toru
コメントありがとうございます。
「相棒」は遊戯王で何度も登場する言葉ですね。

イベントへのお誘いありがとうございます。面白そうですね。
私も参加してみようと思います。ただ、目安となっている英語1600字というのは、達成できない可能性が高いです。
artboy598
The 1600 character limit was just a suggestion. You don’t have to write that much :)
No. 2 tryceattack's correction
tryceattack
  • Kago is a type of human-powered vehicle that can carry a human — it is balanced by a single stick, and two people carry it on their shoulders.
let me correct myself.
the sitting enclosure is hung by a single stick, and two people carry it on their shoulders.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Sea of Blood

Jun 21, 2018 21:49
Sea of Blood

Around 4:30 am today, I woke up because of feeling uncomfortable.

I was sleeping on my face down, and I felt that something dropped from my nose.

I thought "Ah, my nose is running," but when I saw my bedding, I found that there is a sea of blood.

A lot of blood flowed from my nose.

While becoming so depressed, I wiped off the blood on my bedding by using a wet towel repeatedly.

After I dried my bedding, I fell asleep again with a feeling of weariness.

The cause might be that I ate dinner at 11:00 pm yesterday -- eating food late at night increases your blood pressure.
血の海

今日、朝4時半頃、私は違和感を感じて目を覚ましました。

うつ伏せになった体勢で、鼻から何かが垂れ落ちる感覚がしたのです。

「鼻水をたらしてしまったか」と思い、拭こうと思って布団を見ると、血の海ができていました。

大量の鼻血を出していたのです。

すごく憂鬱な気分になりながら、タオルを何度もお湯につけ、布団についた血を拭き取りました。

布団をドライヤーで乾かしたあとは、疲れてまた寝てしまいました。

昨日、よる11時に晩ごはんを食べて、血圧が上がったのが原因かもしれません。
No. 1 Sammy's correction
I hope you're okay!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
Sammy
You're welcome!!

Bokou (母校 - Old School)

Jun 20, 2018 20:59
I visited my "bokou" (母校) yesterday.

Bokou is a school that one's graduated from, that is, it is "old school" or "old university."

Bo (母) means 'mother' and kou (校) means 'school.'
(Here kou(校) is short for gakkou (学校).)

As you can guess, this word compares the school with one's parents who raised them, however, the word fu (父 - father) is never used.

In the Meiji period in Japan, the word gakkou (学校 - school) was chosen as the translation of the English 'school' and the French 'école.'

Also, in many European languages containing French, nouns were classified into male nouns and feminine nouns, and 'école' was a feminine noun.

Because of this, we came to call "a school like parents" bokou.
母校

私は昨日、「母校」を訪れました。

「母校」とは卒業した学校、すなわち "old school" や "old university" のことです。

「母」は 'mother,' 「校」は 'school' を意味します。

その学校は自分を育ててくれた親であるという意味が込められているわけですが、「父」という字が使われることはありません。

明治時代、「学校」という言葉は英語の 'school,' フランス語の 'école' の訳として選ばれました。

また、フランス語を含むヨーロッパの言語の多くは、名詞が男性名詞と女性名詞に分類されており、'école' は女性名詞でした。

このことから、「親なる学校」のことを「母校」と言うようになったそうです。
No. 1 臭豆腐's correction
Toru
Thank you for letting my know that! :)
No. 2 pillows's correction
To give more context to the comment above

Your alma mater is your old school, college or university. It's generally used as a positive term, implying reverence and loyalty for the nurturing qualities of the institution. Alma mater comes from two Latin words meaning "nourishing or bountiful mother."

Copied from wikipedia :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments!
I didn't know that. The word 母校 might come from the Latin words.

Usotsuki wa dorobou no hajimari (嘘つきは泥棒の始まり - He that will Lie will Steal)

Jun 19, 2018 17:08
Usotsuki wa dorobou no hajimari

I think that many people have had a lie at least several times.

There is a Japanese proverb that is related to a lie -- it is "usotsuki wa dorobou no hajimari" (嘘つきは泥棒の始まり).

Usotsuki (嘘つき) means 'lying' or 'liar,' dorobou (泥棒) means 'thief' or 'stealing,' and hajimari (始まり) means 'beginning,' so the literal meaning of this proverb is "lying is the beginning of stealing."

That is to say, this proverb means that if you come to have no qualms about telling lies, you will do something bad like stealing.

Incidentally, when I was searching for this proverb, I found that several similar English expressions; these are "He that will lie will steal" and "Lying and stealing are next door neighbors."
嘘つきは泥棒の始まり

ほとんどの人は、嘘をついたことがあると思います。

日本には嘘にまつわることわざ、「嘘つきは泥棒の始まり」があります。

「嘘つき」は 'lying' や 'liar,' 「泥棒」は 'thief' や 'stealing' 「始まり」は 'beginning' を意味するので、このことわざの文字通りの意味は "lying is the beginning of stealing" となります。

平気で人に嘘をつく用になってしまうと、良心が亡くなり、盗みのような悪事も平気ではたらくようになってしまうということです。

調べてみたら、英語にも "He that will lie will steal" や "Lying and stealing are next door neighbors" といった似た表現がありました。
No. 1 エリ's correction
Very interesting, thank you very much :)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Ni no Ashi wo Fumu (二の足を踏む)

Jun 18, 2018 20:11
Have you ever hesitated or been reluctant to do something?

Such an action is called "ni no ashi wo fumu" (二の足を踏む) in Japanese.

Ni (二) means 'two/second,' ashi (足) means 'foot,' and fumu (踏む) means 'to step.'

Even if you take the first step in doing something, if you are reluctant, you can't take the second step -- it will become just stamping your feet.

The thing is, this idiom represents such a situation.

However, in my opinion, the most important thing is to take the first step.
二の足を踏む

何かをするのに躊躇したり、尻込みしたことはありますか?

そのようなことを、日本語で「二の足を踏む」と言います。

「ニ」は ‘two/second,’ 「足」は ‘foot,’ 「踏む」は ‘to step’ を意味します。

もし一歩目を踏み出しても、尻込みしてしまうと二歩目を踏み出すことができず、その場での足踏みとなってしまいます。

この言葉はそのような状況を表しているというわけです。

個人的には、一歩目を踏み出すことが最も大切なことだと思います。
No. 1 _SoySauce's correction
I agree, but recklessness can be even worse in some situations.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments!
Yes, I think that courage and recklessness are different.

Kiku wa Ittoki no Haji, Kikanu wa Isshō no Haji (聞くは一時の恥、聞かぬは一生の恥)

Jun 17, 2018 18:13
Since I felt ashamed today, I would like to talk about a proverb related to 'shame.'

It is "kiku wa ittoki no haji, kikanu wa isshō no haji" (聞くは一時の恥、聞かぬは一生の恥).

Kiku (聞く) means 'listen to/ask,' ittoki (一時) means 'temporal,' haji (恥) means 'shame,' kikanu (聞かぬ) means 'not listen to/not ask,' and isshō (一生) means 'lifetime.'

As you can guess, this proverb literally means that if you ask something, you will feel ashamed temporarily, but if you don't ask it, you will feel ashamed throughout your lifetime.

There are several similar English expressions; these are "Asking makes one appear foolish, but not asking makes one foolish indeed" and "Better to ask the way than go astray."
聞くは一時の恥、聞かぬは一生の恥

今日私は恥をかいたので、恥に関することわざを紹介します。

それは「聞くは一時の恥、聞かぬは一生の恥」です。

「聞く」は 'listen to/ask,' 「一時」は 'temporal,' 「恥」は 'shame,' 「聞かぬ」は 'not listen to/not ask,' 「一生」は 'lifetime' を意味します。

このことわざは文字通り、「知らないことを聞くのは恥ずかしいが、聞かないままでいると一生恥ずかしい思いをする」ことを意味します。

似た意味を持つ英語表現として、 "Asking makes one appear foolish, but not asking makes one foolish indeed" や "Better to ask the way than go astray" があります。
No. 1 Timmy's correction
Nowadays it's "Googling makes one appear foolish, but not googling makes one foolish indeed" ))
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Haha, that's right.
Timmy
You're welcome!

Rainy Season

Jun 16, 2018 21:43
Rainy Season

The rainy season has started since last week.

For a while, rainy and cloudy days will continue.

I heard that you could improve concentration while listening to the sound of rain.

In fact, according to an article published in the journal "The Atlantic," people can enhance their productivity and creativity in a noisy environment of about 70 decibels, compared to a quiet environment of 50 decibels or less.

On the other hand, if you are in a noisy environment that exceeds 80 decibels, your productivity and creativity seem to be deteriorated.

Unfortunately, I can't enhance my productivity on a rainy day because rain (low pressure) makes my head hurt.
梅雨入り

先週、とうとう梅雨入りしました。

しばらくは、雨の日や曇りの日が続きます。

雨の音が聞こえると、集中力が増すと聞きました。

実際、雑誌「The Atlantic」に掲載された論文によると、50デシベル以下の静寂な環境より、70デシベル程度の雑音に囲まれた環境のほうが、生産性や創造性が増すそうです。

一方、80デシベルを超す雑音環境であると、生産性や創造性は低下するようです。

残念ながら、私は雨の日、頭が痛くなるので、仕事が捗りません。
No. 1 A and C's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)
No. 2 David's correction
A-and-C's suggestions are good.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments! :)

Ikari Shintō ni Hassuru (怒り心頭に発する - Getting Furious)

Jun 15, 2018 16:14
Ikari Shintō ni hassuru

For the last two days, I introduced you to idioms that mean a feeling of anger.

If you want to express your feeling of stronger anger, you can say "ikari shintō ni hassuru" (怒り心頭に発する).

Ikari (怒り) means 'anger,' shintō (心頭) means 'heart/mind,' and hassuru (発する) means 'to generate,' so the literal meaning of this idiom is "anger generates from one's heart."

However, according to a poll conducted several years ago, around 67.1% of Japanese people misunderstand that "ikari shintō ni hassuru" is "ikari shintō ni tassuru" (怒り心頭に達する - anger reaches one's heart).
怒り心頭に発する

昨日と一昨日は、「怒りの感情」を表す言葉を紹介しました。

さらに激しい怒りの感情を表す言葉に、「怒り心頭に発する」があります。

「怒り」は 'anger,' 「心頭」は 'heart/mind,' 「発する」は 'to generate' を意味するので、この言葉の文字通りの意味は "anger generates from one's heart" となります。

しかし、世論調査によると約67.1%の日本人が、「怒り心頭に発する」を「怒り心頭に達する」であると勘違いしているようです。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Thanks for teaching me idioms. I love learning them!
Toru
Thank you very much always for correcting my post! (^^)

Tosaka ni Kuru (トサカにくる - Getting Mad)

Jun 14, 2018 11:07
Yesterday, I introduced you to "atama ni kuru" (頭にくる), which means a feeling of anger.

There is a slang term, "tosaka ni kuru" (トサカにくる), which was derived from "atama ni kuru."

Tosaka (トサカ) means a red protrusion (cockscomb) on the top of a chicken and kuru (来る) means 'to come,' so the literal meaning of this term is "something comes on one's cockscomb."

This term represents that blood come up to one's head (or the top of the head) due to anger, and it can imply stronger angry than "atama ni kuru."

Incidentally, there are several theories about the reasons why chickens have cockscomb; for threatening to male, appeal to female, temperature regulation, and remnants from their ancestor (dinosaur).
トサカにくる

昨日は「怒りの感情」を意味する「頭にくる」という言葉を紹介しました。

「頭にくる」から派生した俗語に、「トサカにくる」があります。

「トサカ」は鶏の頭上にある赤い突起のことです。

怒って頭に血が上ったようす(もしくは頭を通り越して頭上に達したようす)を表現した言葉であり、「頭にくる」よりも強い怒りを表します。

ちなみに、鶏などの頭上にトサカがある理由は諸説あり、雄への威嚇、雌へのアピール、体温調節、先祖(恐竜)の名残などが考えられています。
No. 1 Bantarific's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the helpful corrections! :)

Atama ni Kuru (頭にくる - Getting Mad)

Jun 13, 2018 20:00
There are many idioms that mean a feeling of anger.

For example, I introduced you to the "hara ga tatsu" (腹が立つ) before.
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/126696773005545550838506305683909805102

Today I would like to introduce "atama ni kuru" (頭にくる).

Atama (頭) means 'head' and kuru (くる) means 'come,' so the literal meaning of "atama ni kuru" is "something comes to one's head."

Here, it is thought that the something is just a feeling of anger or blood.

Incidentally, there is a similar idiom, "atama ni chi ga noboru" (頭に血が上る - blood comes up to one's head), which also means a feeling of anger.

I don't know whether or not one's blood would literally come up to the head when the one gets angry.
頭にくる

「怒りの感情」を表す言葉は、さまざまあります。

例えば、私は以前「腹が立つ」という言葉を紹介しました。

今日は「頭にくる」を紹介します。

「頭」は 'head,' 「くる」は 'come' を意味するので、「頭にくる」の文字通りの意味は "something comes to one's head" となります。

ここで、'something' は単純に「怒りの感情」、もしくは「血」を表していると考えられます。

ちなみに「頭に血が上る」という表現もあり、これも「怒りの感情」を意味します。

怒った時、本当に頭に血が上るのかどうかは、よくわかりません。
No. 1 Bantarific's correction
In English there is a similar phrase which you may be aware of. That is, "it went to my/his/her head." This means not to get angry, but rather that someone successfully completed a task, and became arrogant about their own abilities as a result. We also have "It my blood pound" which expresses anger or excitement.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the interesting phrases!
I learned something new. :)
Bantarific
Ugh. Excuse my typo in the previous comment. It should be "it makes/made my blood pound."

Sekishō Idai (積小為大)

Jun 12, 2018 21:18
Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term, "zayū no mei" (座右の銘), which means 'motto.'

Today I would like to introduce you to my zayū no mei.

It is "sekishō idai" (積小為大).

Seki (積) means 'to pile up,' shō (小) means 'small,' i (為) menas 'to accomplish,' and dai (大) means 'big.'

That is to say, this four-character idiom means that if you want to accomplish a great thing, it is important/necessary to pile up small efforts every day.

Incidentally, this idiom is said by a well known person in the Edo period, Sontoku NINOMIYA (二宮尊徳).
積小為大

昨日は「座右の銘」という言葉を紹介しました。

今日は、私の座右の銘を紹介します。

それは、「積小為大」です。

「積」は 'to pile up,' 「小」は 'small,' 「為」は 'to accomplish,' 「大」は 'big' を意味します。

すなわちこの四字熟語は、「大きなことを為すためには、(毎日の)小さな努力の積み重ねが重要である」ということを表しています。

ちなみに、この言葉は江戸時代の偉人、二宮尊徳(二宮金次郎)が言った言葉だとされています。
No. 1 Sinead95's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 artboy598's correction
artboy598
I don’t have a motto σ(^_^;)
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)
To tell you the truth, I began to have my motto only a few years ago.

Zayū no Mei (座右の銘 - Motto)

Jun 11, 2018 13:38
Do you have a "zayū no mei" (座右の銘)?

"Zayū no mei" means words that you keep in your mind and use to admonish/encourage yourself -- it is translated as "motto" or "words to live by" in English.

Za (座) means 'sitting,' yū (右) means 'right,' and mei (銘) means "words engraved in your mind."

In the past, emperors made a reliable assistant sit on their right side, so zayū (座右) can mean one's surroundings or one's familiar thing.

That is to say, "zayū no mei" represents words that are engraved in your mind and are always put in your vicinity.
座右の銘

皆さんは「座右の銘」を持っていますか?

「座右の銘」とは、「常に心に留めておき、戒めや励ましとする言葉」のことで、英語では "motto" もしくは "words to live by" と訳されます。

「座」は "sitting," 「右」は "right," 「銘」は「心に刻む言葉」を意味します。

かつて、皇帝は自分の右手側の席に信頼のおける補佐役を座らせたことから、「座右」は「座っているところのかたわら」や「身近な存在」という意味を持ちます。

すなわち「座右の銘」とは、「心に刻んで、常の自分のかたわらに置いておく言葉」というわけです。

Ushi no Yodare (牛の涎 - Cow's Drool)

Jun 11, 2018 13:37
(※ Yesterday, I forgot to push the 'Pubmit' button…)

Ushi no Yodare

In Japanese, there is a phrase "ushi no yodare" (牛の涎).

Ushi (牛) means 'cow' or 'bull' and yodare (涎) meams 'drool.'

Of course, "ushi no yodare" can literally mean "cow's drool," but it can also mean that something continues as a trickle like cow's drool.

Also, there is a proverb that uses this phrase, "akinai wa ushi no yodare" (商いは牛の涎 - business/trade is cow's drool).

This proverb means that you should continue your business patiently for a long time (should not rush to make a profit) like cow's drool keep falling slowly.
(※ 昨日、「投稿」ボタンを押し忘れてしまいました・・・。)

牛の涎

日本語には「牛の涎」という表現があります。

「牛」は "cow" や "bull," 「涎」は "drool" を意味します。

「牛の涎」もちろん文字通り "cow's drool" を意味することもありますが、牛の涎は細く長く続くことから、「細く長く続くもの」のたとえとして使うこともできます。

また、「商いは牛の涎」ということわざもあります。

このことわざは、商売は牛の涎のように、気長に辛抱強く続けるべきであることを意味します。
No. 1 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

> 'Pubmit'
Ah, I mixed 'submit' and 'publish.'

Ha ga Uku (歯が浮く - One's Teeth are on Edge)

Jun 9, 2018 16:38
Ha ga Uku

Have you ever felt uncomfortable because of being told an artificial compliment or genteel words?

Becoming such a feeling is called "ha ga uku" (歯が浮く) in Japanese.

Since ha (歯) means 'tooth' and uku (浮く) means 'to float,' the literal meaning of "ha ga uku" is "one's teeth float."

If your tooth root loosens, you will feel as if your teeth would be floating and feel uncomfortable.

"Ha ga uku" came from this fact.

Interestingly, the English expression "one's teeth are on edge" has the similar meaning of this term.

【Example sentence】
Kare wa itsumo ha ga uku youna oseji wo zyosei ni iu (彼はいつも歯が浮くようなお世辞を女性に言う - He always say shameless compliment to women.)
歯が浮く

見え透いたお世辞や気取った言葉を言われ、かえって不快な気持ちになったことはありますか?

そのような気持ちになることを、「歯が浮く」と言います。

「歯」は "tooth," 「浮く」は "to float" を意味するので、「歯が浮く」の文字通りの意味は "one's teeth float" です。

歯の根元がゆるむと、歯が浮いたように思えて、不快に感じます。

「歯が浮く」は、この事実に由来します。

興味深いことに、英語でもこの不快感を表現する時、"one's teeth are on edge" のように「歯」を使うようです。

【例文】
彼はいつも歯が浮くようなお世辞を女性に言う。
No. 1 vinkaks's correction
An interesting post. It's funny the same idiom exists in both Japanese and English. 笑笑
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post again!
Yes, it is an interesting fact. :)

Shinki Itten (心機一転 - Turning Over a New Leaf)

Jun 8, 2018 22:49
Shinki Itten

Two days ago, I introduced you to the phrase "ki ga ki de nai" (気が気でない - anxious), because I was terribly anxious about a result of a certain thing.

Unfortunately, I received a negative result and was very depressed yesterday.

However, I would like to renew my mind and do my best from today.

To express this my thought, I can say the four-character idiom, shinki itten (心機一転).

Shin (心) means 'heart,' ki (機) means 'impulse,' i/ichi (一) means 'one,' and ten (転) means 'rolling.'

That is to say, shinki means "mind movement," itten means "something changes drastically," and the combination means "to turn over a new leaf."
心機一転

二日前、私はある結果が気になって仕方がなく、「気が気でない」という表現を紹介しました。

そして昨日、残念な結果を受け取り、とても落ち込みました。

しかし今日からは、気持ちを改めて頑張っていきたいと思います。

この私の考えを表す四字熟語として、「心機一転」があります。

「心」は "mind/heart," 「機」は "impulse," 「一」は "one," そして 「転」は "rolling" を意味します。

すなわち「心機」は "mind movement," 「一転」は "something changes drastically," そして「心機一転」は "to turn over a new leaf" を意味するというわけです。
No. 1 vinkaks's correction
I am feeling very sleepy, hope I didn't make any mistakes :) 頑張って!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Furo (風呂 - Bath/Bathtub)

Jun 7, 2018 21:15
Previously, I introduced you to the Japanese word yubune (湯船), which means 'bathtub.'
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/85082085532275896741154949019788891411

Today I would like to talk about furo (風呂), which is more commonly used than yubune.

Furo mainly meant steam bath until the Edo period, but these days it means 'bath' or 'bathtub.'

You can say "furo ni hairu" (風呂に入る - entering furo) to mean to both take a shower and get in a bathtub.

If you want to express each action explicitly, you should say "shawā wo abiru" (シャワーを浴びる - taking a shower) or "yubune ni tsukaru" (湯船に浸かる - getting in a bathtub).
風呂

私は以前、「湯船」という言葉を紹介しました。

今日は、より一般的に使われる「風呂」を紹介します。

「風呂」は江戸時代初期まで、「蒸し風呂」を指す言葉でしたが、現在では「浴室」や「湯船」を意味します。

シャワーを浴びることも、湯船に浸かることも、どちらも「風呂に入る」と言うことができます。

もしそれぞれを明示的に表したいのであれば、「シャワーを浴びる」「湯船に浸かる」のように言います。
No. 1 lauren (雅伦)'s correction
perfect!

Ki ga Ki de nai (気が気でない - Anxious)

Jun 6, 2018 12:45
I am terribly anxious about a certain thing and unsettling now.

When expressing this situation, you can say "ki ga ki de nai" (気が気でない) in Japanese.

Ki (気) means 'feeling' or 'mind'.

Also, "A ga B de nai" (AがBでない) means "A is not B."

That is to say, "ki ga ki de nai" means that one's feeling is not the (normal/usual) feeling.

I hope the next week will come soon.

【Example sentence】
Shiken no kekka ga kowakute ki ga ki de nai (試験の結果が怖くて気が気でない - I am deeply concerned about the result of my exam.)
気が気でない

私は今、あることが心配で気持ちが落ち着きません。

そのような状態のことを、日本語で「気が気でない」と言うことがあります。

「気」は "feeling" や "mind" を意味します。

そして、「AがBでない」は "A is not B" という意味です。

すなわち「気が気でない」は、「気がいつもの気(平常心)じゃない」ということを意味するというわけです。

早く時間が過ぎ去ってほしいです。

【例文】
試験の結果が怖くて気が気でない。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
ありがとうございます!
Toru
こちらこそ、投稿を読んでくれてありがとうございます。 (^^)
No. 2 Judy's correction
Toru
Thank you for checking my post! (^^)
No. 3 pillows's correction
I love that I can learn a Japanese phrase while making corrections.

Thank you
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you sat that. :)

Nezi wo Maku (ねじを巻く - Rolling up One's Sleeves)

Jun 5, 2018 21:00
When making someone/oneself improve their/one's loose attitudes, it is called neji wo maku (ねじを巻く) in Japanese.

Neji (ねじ) means "screw," maku (巻く) means "to wind something," so the literal meaning of neji wo maku is "to screw up" or "to tighten a screw."

If you tighten a screw, of course, a loose state will be tightened.

This idiom is comparing the loose state with people's loose attitudes or feelings.

It is an interesting fact that this Japanese idiom has the positive meaning, whereas the English term "to screw up" can mean "to mess up."
ねじを巻く

だらしない行動や態度をきちんとさせることを、「ねじを巻く」と言います。

「ねじ」は "screw" 、「巻く」は "to wind something" を意味するため、「ねじを巻く」の文字通りの意味は "to screw up" です。

ねじを巻けば、ゆるんだ状態が引き締まります。

ねじのゆるんだ状態を、人のだらしない状態や気持ちにたとえているわけです。

日本語の「ねじを巻く」は良い意味なのに対し、英語の "screw up" は「台無しにする」ことを意味する事実は、とても興味深いです。
No. 1 Trideous's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 pillows's correction
Rarely do we define attitudes as being loose in English although that may not be the case in Japanese. Lazy attitude maybe ?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Actually, Japanese people often use the word 'loose' (ルーズ) as a kind of personality. But maybe 'lazy' is more appropriate as what I wanted to say.

Kinsen ni Fureru (琴線に触れる - Touching a Chord)

Jun 4, 2018 19:01
I watched the movie Koe no Katachi (聲の形 - The Shape of the Voice) yesterday.

Kono eiga wa, watasgu no kinsen ni fure mashita (この映画は、私の琴線に触れました).

The idiom kinsen ni fureru (琴線に触れる) means that a great/beautiful thing impresses you or makes you sympathize.

Kin (琴) means a traditional Chinese stringed instrument, sen (線) means "chord," and fureru (触れる) means "to touch."

Thus, this idiom was born by comparing a chord of kin with a heart that is easy to resonate.

However, some people misunderstand that this idiom means to do something to anger.
琴線に触れる

私は昨日、「聲の形」という映画を観ました。

この映画は、私の琴線に触れました。

「琴線に触れる」という慣用句は、素晴らしい作品などが人に感動や共感を与えることを意味します。

「琴」は中国の伝統的な弦楽器を、「線」は "chord" を、「触れる」は "to touch" を意味します。

「物事に感動・共鳴しやすい心」を「琴線」にたとえて、この言葉ができたというわけです。

ただ、最近は「琴線に触れる」を「怒りを買うこと」という意味だと勘違いしている人も多いようです。
No. 1 Sinead95's correction
面白いですね!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 Amop567's correction

Uwa no Sora (上の空 - Absence of Mind)

Jun 3, 2018 12:51
Recently, I often become a state called uwa no sora (上の空).

Uwa no sora means that you can't concentrate on what you have to do because you can't stop thinking other things.

Uwa (上) means "above/upper" and sora (空) means "sky," so the literal meaning of this term is "above the sky."

Originally, there were terms that mean that you don't concentrate; kokoro sora nari (心空なり - one's heart is in the sky) and sora naru kokoro (空なる心 - one's heart is in the sky).

In order to emphasize these terms, it became uwa no sora naru kokoro (上の空なる心 - one's heart is above the sky), then changed to just uwa no sora (上の空).
上の空

私は最近、「上の空」によくなります。

「上の空」とは、他の事に心が奪われて、目の前のことに集中できないさまを表す言葉です。

「上」は "above" や "upper," 「空」は "sky" を意味するため、この言葉の文字通りの意味は "above the sky" となります。

もともと、「落ち着かないさま」を表す言葉として「心空なり」「空なる心」がありました。

これを強調するため「上の空なる心」となり、後半が削られて「上の空」になったというわけです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

Hyakka Ryouran (百花繚乱)

Jun 2, 2018 15:58
Three days ago, I introduced you to the Japanese idiom ken wo kisou (妍を競う), which means that women compete based on their beauty.

Today I would like to talk about the four-character idiom hyakka ryouran (百花繚乱), which is related to ken wo kisou.

Hya/hyaku (百) means "hundred," ka (花) means "flower," ryou (繚) means "twisting around," and ran (乱) means "disorder."

This idiom can literally mean that various flowers are blooming in profusion.

In addition to that, by comparing beautiful flowers with people, it can mean that excellent people/beautiful women are gathering.
百花繚乱

三日前、「女性が美しさを競う」ことを意味する慣用句「妍を競う」という言葉を紹介しました。

今日はこの言葉と関連する「百花繚乱」という四字熟語を紹介します。

「百」は "hundred," 「花」は "flower," 「繚」は "twisting around," そして「乱」は "disorder" を意味します。

この言葉は4つの漢字が意味するとおり、「さまざまな花が色とりどりに咲き乱れるようす」を表すこともあります。

さらに、「美しい花」を「人」にたとえて、「優れた人や美女が大勢集まるさま」を意味することもできます。
No. 1 Tom's correction
I like it! I tried to think of a similar idiom in English, but couldn't come up with one. The closest I got was "a sausage fest" which is when there are too many men at a party! :D
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the expression!
I learned something new. :)

By the way, I used the word "profusion" because I referred to the following pages:
http://www.romajidesu.com/dictionary/meaning-of-%E7%B9%9A.html
https://www.nihongomaster.com/dictionary/entry/46930/hyakkaryouran

Hiniku (皮肉 - Sarcasm/Irony)

Jun 1, 2018 21:54
I heard that English has many sarcasm and irony.

Sarcasm and irony are called hiniku (皮肉) in Japanese.

Hi (皮) means "skin" and niku (肉) means "flesh," so the literal meaning of hiniku is "skin and flesh."

This word came from the Buddhist term hiniku-kotsuzui (皮肉骨髄), which was used by Daruma Daishi (the founder of a Buddhist sect) to evaluate his desciples.

Kotsu (骨 - bone) and zui (髄 - marrow) imply "essential understanding," whereas hi (皮 - skin) and niku (肉 - flesh) imply "surface understanding."

Since hi and niku was a critical evaluation, hiniku came to have its current meaning.
皮肉

英語には多くの皮肉表現(sarcasm/irony)があると聞きました。

"Sarcasm" や "irony" は日本語で「皮肉」と言われます。

「皮」は "skin," 「肉」は "flesh" を意味するので、「皮肉」の文字通りの意味は "skin and flesh" となります。

「皮肉」の語源は、仏教で達磨大師が弟子たちの修行の評価に使った言葉「皮肉骨髄」にあります。

「骨」と「髄」はそれぞれ「本質的な理解」を示唆し、それに対して「皮」と「肉」は「表面的な理解」を示唆しています。

「皮」と「肉」は批判的な評価であることから、「皮肉」は現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 tony's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
It's interesting. 皮肉 has several meanings, but in my opinion, 皮肉 is closer to irony, whereas sarcasm is closer to 嫌味.

Hinagata (雛形 - form/model/template)

May 31, 2018 21:28
We refer to forms that show how to write documents or models of industrial products as hinagata (雛形).

Hina (雛) means a baby bird and gata/kata (形) means forms or shapes.

The original meaning of hina is "a baby bird," but it can mean that something is little or small.

Because of this, small models that shaped real things came to be called hinagata.

Furthermore, it came also to mean various forms and models.

Incidentally, hinagata on computer data are often referred to as tempurēto (テンプレート - template), which is the loanword from English.
雛形

書類の書き方を示す見本や、工業製品の原型・模型などのことを日本語で「雛形」と言います。

「雛」は、卵からかえったばかりの鳥の子、すなわち "a baby bird" を、「形」は "form" や "shape" を意味します。

「雛」の本来の意味は "a baby bird" ですが、「幼いこと」や「小さいこと」を意味することもできます。

このことから、実物をかたどって小さくした模型などが「雛形」と呼ばれるようになりました。

後に、「見本」や「手本」という意味も持つようになったということです。

コンピュータ上での雛形は、「テンプレート」と呼ばれることも多いです。
No. 1 Yukinekorin's correction
:)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction, Yukinekorin-san! (^^)

Ken wo Kisou (妍を競う - Vying in Beauty)

May 30, 2018 18:38
When women compete on their beauty, you can describe the situation using the phrase ken wo kisou (妍を競う).

Ken (妍) means a beautiful appearance or grace of a woman and kisou (競う) means to compete or to vie.

Interestingly, the kanji 妍 is used almost only in the phrase ken wo kisou.
(At least, I haven't seen other usage of this kanji.)

Since there are many kanjis that can be read as ken (けん), I think that it is difficult to convey the meaning of ken (妍) in daily conversation.

Also, this phrase might be a little old, and recent young people might not understand it.
妍を競う

女性が美しさを競い合うことを、「妍を競う」と言います。

「妍」は女性の容貌が美しく整っているさまを表す言葉で、「競う」は "to compete" や "to vie" を意味します。

面白いことに、「妍」という漢字はほとんど、「妍を競う」という表現の中でしか使われません。
(少なくとも私は他の使い方を見たことがありません。)

「けん」と読む漢字は「剣」や「券」、「県」など他にも沢山あるので、「妍を競う」以外で「妍」を使っても口頭では伝わらないかもしれません。

また、「妍を競う」は少し古い表現かもしれなく、最近の若い人には意味が伝わらない可能性があります。
No. 1 chibi-lang's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations!

Ten ni Tsuba Suru (天に唾する - Slander Flings Stones at Itself)

May 29, 2018 10:36
Have you ever hurt yourself as a result of trying to harm others?

Such a situation is expressed as the proverb ten ni tsuba suru (天に唾する).

Ten (天) means "sky" and tsuba suru (唾する) means "to spit," so the literal meaning of the combination is "to spit on the sky."

As you would guess, even if you spit while looking up, you can't dirty the sky, and your face will get dirty.

Because of this, this proverb is used as the current meaning.

Incidentally, about 20% of Japanese people think that this proverb means "to defile a person in a position higher than myself."
天に唾する

人に害を与えようとしたら、かえって自分自身に害がふりかかってしまったことはありますか?

そのようなことを、「天に唾する」と言います。

「天」は "sky," 「唾する」は "to spit" を意味するので、この言葉の文字通りの意味は "to spit on the sky" になります。

たとえ天に向かって唾を吐いても、空を汚すことはできず、自分の顔にかかってしまいます。

このことから、このことわざは現在の意味で使われています。

ちなみに、約2割の日本人が、このことわざを「自分より上の立場の人を冒とくする」という意味だと思っているようです。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Interesting. It reminds me of “Tom and Jerry” or “Roadrunner” cartoons lol.
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
I didn't know the latter animation, but it looks like "Tom and Jerry," isn't it? I will check it. :)
No. 2 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Oyakodon (親子丼)

May 28, 2018 20:09
I ate oyakodon (親子丼) yesterday.

Oya (親) means "parent," ko (子) means "child," and don (丼) means "bowl" or "rice bowl."

Oyakodon is a kind of dish made by putting boiled chicken over rice with egg.

Since this dish uses chicken and chicken egg, it is called oyakodon, the literal meaning of which is "a parent-and-child rice bowl."

Incidentally, the dish name I ate was kyūkyoku no oyakodon (究極の親子丼 - ultimate oyakodon) at a restaurant named Torimikura (鶏味座) in Minami Aoyama, Tokyo.

http://www.wid.co.jp/tenpo/torimikura-aoyama/
親子丼

私は昨日、親子丼を食べました。

「親」は "parent," 「子」は "child," 「丼」は "bowl" もしくは "rice bowl" を意味します。

親子丼は、煮た鶏肉を鶏の卵でとじ、ご飯の上に乗せた料理のことです。

鶏の肉と鶏の卵を使うことから、「親子丼」という名前がつけられています。

ちなみに私が食べたのは「鶏味座」というお店で、料理名は「究極の親子丼」でした。
No. 1 SecretSauce's correction
Maybe I'll go there soon!
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post!
Since the dish was delicious, please try it. :)
No. 2 SallyG's correction
Good work your English sounds great!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Pafe (パフェ - Parfait)

May 27, 2018 16:01
Pafe (パフェ) is a popular dessert among women.

In Japan, pafe represents a dessert in a tall glass that is decorated with ice cream and fruits.

It is said that this word comes from the French "parfait" or the English "perfect" -- both of them imply that the dessert is perfect.

Parfait in France usually refers to frozen sweets made by mixing and freezing egg yolk and whipped cream, and they are often served with sauce and fruits.

The etymology is same, but the definition seems to differ from country to country.

Also, there is "sundae" in the US, which is ice cream with some toppings.
パフェ

女性に人気のデザートに「パフェ」があります。

「パフェ」は、背の高いグラスに、アイスクリームやフルーツなどを飾ったデザートのことを指します。

「完璧なデザート」という意味で、フランス語の「パルフェ (parfait)」もしくは英語の「パーフェクト (perfect)」から来ていると考えられています。

フランスのパルフェは、卵黄とホイップクリームを混ぜて凍らせたアイスクリームに、ソースや果物を添えたものを指すのが一般的です。

語源は同じですが、日本やアメリカのパフェとは少し違うようです。

また、パフェとよく似たアメリカ発祥のデザートに、アイスクリームにソースなどのトッピングをした「サンデー」があります。

Shaku (尺)

Mar 28, 2018 18:03
The day before yesterday, I talked about 丈 (jō), which is used as a unit of length in East Asia.

There is another unit of length, 尺 (shaku), which is more common, and 1丈 is defined as 10尺.

Originally, "shaku" represents the length between the thumb and the index finger when spreading one's hand.

This length was around 18 cm, but of course, people have different hand sizes, so it was not an absolute unit.

Later, people decided to fix the length of the unit, and it gradually became long.

Finally, 1尺 became 1/3 meters in China, 10/33 meters in Japan.

As you can guess 1丈 (= 10尺) has also changed.

In the past, 1丈 (about 180 cm at that time) represented a grown man, but now it exceeds 3 meters.


一昨日の投稿の中で、私は「丈」という東アジアで使われる長さの単位を紹介しました。

もっと高い頻度で使われる長さの単位に「尺」があり、1丈は10尺と定義されています。

「尺」はもともと、手を広げた際の親指から人差し指までの長さを表しました。

この長さは18cm前後であったようですが、当然人によって長さが異なるため、正確な基準にはなりません。

後に、一定の長さを尺と定めるようになり、時代とともにどんどん長く変化していきました。

そして最終的に1尺の長さは、中国では1/3メートル、日本では10/33メートルとなりました。

当然、これに合わせて1丈(=10尺)の長さも変化してきました。

もともと1丈(=当時約180cm)は成人男性の一つ基準になっていましたが、今では3mを超えています。
No. 1 Bull's correction
Looks good. No complaints for me.
Toru
Thank you for checking my post!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Waki Aiai (和気あいあい - Cozy)

Mar 27, 2018 22:07
I think that many people like situations where peaceful and open-minded atmosphere are filled.

Such a situation or atmosphere is called 和気あいあい (waki aiai) in Japanese.

和 (wa) means "peaceful" and 気 (ki) means "feeling," so the literal meaning of "waki" is "peaceful feeling."

Also, あい/藹/靄 (ai) means that vegetation is lush, and the repetition emphasizes the meaning itself.

That is to say, this term implies that peaceful feelings spread as if vegetation were lush.

For example, you can say 昨日の面接は和気藹藹としていた (kinou no mensetsu wa waki-aiai to shiteita - Yesterday's job interview was cozy.)
和気藹藹

和やかで打ち解けた雰囲気が満ちている状態を好きな人は多いと思います。

そのような状態、雰囲気のことを、日本語で「和気藹藹」と言います。

「和」は「和やか」、「気」は「気分」を意味するので、「和気」は「和やかな気分」という意味です。

また、「藹」は「草木が茂っているさま」を意味し、連続して用いることで意味を強調しています。

すなわちこの言葉は、「和やかな気分が生い茂る草木のように広がっている」ことを表します。

例えば、「昨日の面接は和気藹藹としていた」のように使います。
No. 1 PeterJ's correction
面白かった!I wrote my own article about this after reading: http://lang-8.com/484726/journals/145804745172373564707323580321723352110 :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
And thank you for your interest :)

Daijōbu (大丈夫 - It's Okay) Part 2

Mar 26, 2018 19:58
Previously, I introduced you to the Japanese term 大丈夫 (daijōbu), which is often used as the meaning of "it's okay" or "no problem."

http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/81720289771087487824771147428200042192

Today I'd like to talk about its etymology.

大 (dai) means "big," 丈 (jō) means a unit of length based on a height of an adult male, and 夫 (bu/fu) means "man."

In the past in China, adult men were called 丈夫, and especially fully grown men were called 大丈夫.

After this term was brought to Japan, the meaning of fully grown men was extended to other meanings; "it's strong," "it's okay," and "no problem."

Incidentally, the length of 1 丈 was about 1.8 meters in those days in China, but now it is about 3 meters.
大丈夫 Part 2

以前私は "it's okay" や "no problem" の意味でよく使われる「大丈夫」という日本語を紹介しました。

今日は、この言葉の語源を説明します。

「大」は "big," 「丈」は成人男性の身長を基準とした長さの単位、「夫」は "man" を意味します。

かつて中国では成人男性を「丈夫」と言い、特に一人前の男のことを「大丈夫」と言いました。

この言葉が日本に伝わり、立派な男の意味から「強い」「安心できる」「問題無い」などの意味に派生しました。

ちなみに、1 丈 は当時の中国では約 1.8 m でしたが、今では 約 3 m となっています。
No. 1 nagi's correction
Very interesting!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
nagi
But now I'm curious. Why did 1丈 change to 3 meters?!
Toru
Thank you for the good question. I would like to search for/consider the answer and post about it. If you have time, please check my tomorrow's entry.
No. 2 PeterJ's correction
面白かった。知っていませんでした!I didn't know :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, the meaning has gradually changed.

Nodoka (のどか - Peaceful)

Mar 25, 2018 14:56
I love a situation expressed as のどか (nodoka).

"Nodoka" means that something is quiet, calm, and relaxing, or the weather is serene and mild.

For example, you can say 今日はのどかだなあ (kyou wa nodoka dana - Today is peaceful).

のど (nodo) of "nodoka" is an ancient word that means that something is calm.

By adding the suffix か (ka) that means that something is in a certain state to "nodo", "nodoka" was created.

"Nodoka" is usually used for a mood or weather.

However, note that if you use it for a person, it can be an ironic meaning.
のどか

私は「のどか」な状況が大好きです。

「のどか」は、静かでのんびりとして落ち着いているさまや、天気が良く穏やかなさまを表す言葉です。

例えば「今日はのどかだなあ」のように使います。

「のどか」の「のど」は、穏やかなさまを意味する古語です。

これに、ある状態であることを表す接尾語「か」がついて、「のどか」になったというわけです。

「のどか」は基本的に気分や気候に対して使う言葉ですが、人に対して使うと皮肉に聞こえる可能性があるので注意して下さい。
No. 1 Yukinekorin's correction
Interesting! Is this usually used in daily life? I would like to try using it haha. ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
Yes, we use のどか in daily life. :)
In particular, it is often used to describe a calm and pleasant weather in spring.
Yukinekorin
Always my pleasure ^^ Thanks for introducing new expressions all this time. They really help me in my studies in Japanese. :D

Kawaribanko (かわりばんこ - Switching)

Mar 24, 2018 17:37
When people switch or change places repeatedly, we refer to the action as the Japanese term かわりばんこ (kawaribanko).

かわり (kawari) means "switch," "change," or "rotate," but there are two theories about the etymology of ばんこ (banko).

One is that it comes from the fact that we called steelworkers who switched their tasks frequently 番子 (banko).

The other one is that "kawaribanko" was created by adding 子 (ko - child) to 代わり番 (kawariban).
(When expressing something informally, we sometimes adding "ko.")

番 (ban) means "sequential order," and "kawariban" has the same meaning as "kawaribanko."
かわりばんこ

何かを交代で繰り返し行うことを、日本語で「かわりばんこ」と言います。

「かわり」は "switch" や "rotate" を意味しますが、「ばんこ」の意味については大きく二つの説があります。

一つは、たたら製鉄という足を踏んで空気を送る装置による製鉄において、次々に交代する労働者のことを「番子」と呼んでいたことに由来するという説です。

もう一つは、「かわりばんこ」と同じ意味を持つ「代わり番」という言葉に、口語的に「子」がついたという説です。

「代わり番」の「番」は、「順番」 ("sequential order") を意味します。
No. 1 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Hokuro (ほくろ - Mole)

Mar 23, 2018 09:02
I have several ほくろ (hokuro) on my face, palms, and body, etc.

"Hokuro" refers to a black spot on the body surface formed by gathering melanin pigments (ie "mole").

In the past, this word was ははくそ (hahakuso).

はは (haha) means "mother" and くそ (kuso) means "excrement," so the literal meaning of its combination is "mother's excrement."

That is to say, Japanese people thought that moles were excrements adhered in mother's body.

Later, "hahakuso" changed to ははくろ (hahakuro) due to mole's color ("kuro" means "black").

Furthermore, "hahakuro" changed to "haukuro," "houkuro," and "hokuro."
ほくろ

私は顔や手のひら、お腹などに、幾つかの「ほくろ」があります。

「ほくろ」とは、メラニン色素が集まってできた、黒い斑点のことを指します。

かつてこの言葉は、「ははくそ」と呼ばれていたそうです。

「はは」は "mother," 「くそ」は "excrement" を意味するので、「ははくそ」の文字通りの意味は "mother's excrement" です。

すなわち、ほくろは母体内でついた不純物だと考えられていたというわけです。

これが後に、その色から「ははくろ」になり、「はうくろ」、「ほーくろ」、「ほくろ」と変化していったそうです。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)
artboy598
Thank YOU for the lesson!

Yubune (湯船 - Bathtub)

Mar 22, 2018 09:09
Most Japanese houses have 湯船 (yubune).

湯 (yu) means "hot water," 船 (fune/bune) means "boat," and "yubune" is a large container to keep hot water for bath, that is to say, it's a bathtub.

In the Edo period in Japan, the custom of getting in a bathtub became gradually popular.

At that time, 銭湯 (sento - public bath house) was common, but the number of "sento" was limited because it needed a lot of hot water.

Because of this, a mobile bath house made by renovating a boat was born.

This is the derivation of the Japanese word 湯船 (yubune - lit. a hot water boat).
湯船

日本の多くの家庭には、「湯船」があります。

「湯船」とは、入浴のため湯をためておく大きな容れ物、すなわち浴槽のことを意味します。

日本では江戸時代、風呂に入る習慣が広まってきましたが、かつては銭湯が主流でした。

しかし、大量の湯を使う銭湯の件数は限られていました。

そこで、船の中に浴槽を作り湯を張って入浴させる、移動式の風呂屋が誕生しました。

これが、「湯船」という言葉の由来です。
No. 1 tony's correction
Are 湯船 and 風呂 two different names for the same thing? I have heard what some people have in their houses called 風呂.
「湯船」と「風呂」と違いますか。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

> Are 湯船 and 風呂 two different names for the same thing? I have heard what some people have in their houses called 風呂.
It's a little difficult question. 湯船 is mainly used to mean "bathtub," whereas 風呂 can mean both "bathtub" and "bathroom." If you say 風呂に入る, I don't know whether you will just take a shower or get in a bathtub. Also, you can say 風呂で湯船に浸かる (I get in a bathtub in a bathroom).
tony
分かりました。ありがとうございます。

Snow on the Vernal Equinox Day

Mar 21, 2018 18:17
Today is a holiday called 春分の日 (shunbun no hi).

春 (shun) means "spring," 分 (bun) means "split," 日 (hi) means "day," and the combination means "Vernal Equinox Day."

It is known as a day that has almost an equally long day and night, and I explained the detail on it in the following entry:
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/117369300646573421504006656544654396364

This day has been treated as a day for celebrating the coming of spring since ancient times, and various events have been held.

However, in the Kanto region containing Tokyo, it was hit by heavy snow today.

Actually, cherry trees in Tokyo started to bloom from four days ago.

This year, you may see 雪桜 (yukizakura - snow cherry).
春分の日に雪

今日は春分の日で、祝日です。

春分の日は昼と夜の長さがほぼ等しくなる日で、詳しくは去年の以下の投稿で説明しています。
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/117369300646573421504006656544654396364

この日は古来より春の訪れを祝う日とし、さまざまな行事が行われてきました。

しかし今日は、東京を含む関東地方で大雪が降りました。

実は4日前、東京では桜が開花しました。

今年は桜に雪が積もる「雪桜」を見ることができそうです。
No. 1 Victoria's correction
In England we've been getting a lot of snow as well! The media calls it 'the beast from the East' as the cold air is being swept in from Siberia! ❄❄❄
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post again!
And thank you for letting me know the very interesting expression (^^)
No. 2 スイちゃん's correction
せっかくの休日が雪なんてちょっともったいないですね。
でも、雪桜が見えたらラッキーですね(´∀`*)
Toru
そうですね~
残念ながら私の住んでいる場所では、途中から雨になってほとんど雪が積もりませんでした(笑)

Te wo Yaku (手を焼く - Having Trouble with Something)

Mar 20, 2018 18:50
Today a graduation ceremony took place at my university.

In this year, it was hard to take care of my graduating students.

Like this way, when you have difficulty with something or things are too much to handle, you can say 手を焼く (te wo yaku) to express it.

手 (te) means "hand" and 焼く (yaku) means "to burn," so the literal meaning of "te wo yaku" is "to burn one's hand."

If you get a burn while doing something, it will become hard to try to touch it again.

Because of this, "te wo yaku" has come to mean "to have difficulty/trouble with something."
手を焼く

今日は私の大学の卒業式でした。

今年の卒業生たちは、面倒を見るのが大変でした。

このように何かの扱いに手こずったり、持て余したりすることを、「手を焼く」と表現することがあります。

「手」は "hand," 「焼く」は "to burn" を意味するので、「手を焼く」の文字どおりの意味は "to burn one's hand" となります。

何かをするときに手に火傷を負うと、再び手を付けるのが嫌になってしまいます。

このことから、「手を焼く」は「扱いに困る」のような意味で使われるようになりました。
No. 1 Victoria's correction
Another great entry! I defiantly feel 'te wo yaku" after graduating uni! Love learning about these phrases :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Tateba Shakuyaku, Suwareba Botan, Aruku Sugata wa Yuri no Hana (立てば芍薬、座れば牡丹、歩く姿は百合の花) Part 2

Mar 19, 2018 19:13
Today's post is the continuation of yesterday's post.

座れば (suwareba) means "when she sits down," and 牡丹 (botan) means "tree peony."

"Botan" bears beautiful flowers on tips of spread branches.

The figure spreading sideways evokes a beautiful woman sitting down.

歩く姿 (aruku sugata) means "walking figure," and 百合の花 (yuri no hana) means "a lily flower."

"Yuri" bears a flower on the tip of its supple stem.

A scene that a lily flower sways in the wind evokes a woman walking gracefully.

Because of these ideas, this phrase was born.

"Tateba shakuyaku, suwareba botan, aruku sugata wa yuri no hana" is one of the best compliment with women.
立てば芍薬、座れば牡丹、歩く姿は百合の花 Part 2

今日の投稿は、昨日の続きです。

「座れば」は "when she sits down," 「牡丹」は "tree peony" を意味します。

牡丹は枝分かれした横向きの枝の先々に、美しい花を咲かせます。

その横に広がる姿は、まるで美しい女性が座っているかのように見えます。

「歩く姿」は "walking figure," 「百合の花」は "a lily flower" を意味します。

百合は、しなやかな茎の先に、やや下向きに花を咲かせます。

百合が風をうけて揺れる様子は、まるで女性が優雅に歩いているように見えます。

このようなことから、この表現が生まれました。

「立てば芍薬、座れば牡丹、歩く姿は百合の花」は、女性に対する最高級の褒め言葉です。
No. 1 Victoria's correction
This is so interesting and very clear! I have changed 2 sentences just to write more natural English. A beautiful phrase :)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)
No. 2 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting me! (^^)

Tateba Shakuyaku, Suwareba Botan, Aruku Sugata wa Yuri no Hana (立てば芍薬、座れば牡丹、歩く姿は百合の花) Part 1

Mar 18, 2018 14:36
Yesterday, I introduced you to that 姥桜 (uba zakura) can describe a beautiful elderly lady.

There is another Japanese phrase using flowers, that can also describe a beauty of woman's appearance, feel and act.

It is 立てば芍薬、座れば牡丹、歩く姿は百合の花 (tateba shakuyaku, suwareba botan, aruku sugata wa yuri no hana).

立てば (tateba) means "when she stands," and 芍薬 (shakuyaku) means "Paeoniae lactiflora."

"Shakuyaku" bears a beautiful flower on the top of the long slender stem.

This figure is as if a beautiful woman were standing.

(Since this entry would be long, it continues on Part 2.)
立てば芍薬、座れば牡丹、歩く姿は百合の花 Part 1

昨日は、「姥桜」が年配女性の美しさを形容する言葉であることを紹介しました。

日本語にはその他にも、花を使って女性の容姿や立ち振舞の美しさを形容する表現があります。

それは「立てば芍薬、座れば牡丹、歩く姿は百合の花」です。

「立てば」は "when she stands," 「芍薬」は "Paeonia lactiflora" を意味します。

「芍薬」は、すらりと伸びた茎の先に美しい花を咲かせます。

このことから、芍薬はまるで美しい女性が立っているかのように見えます。

(長くなるので、Part 2 に続きます。)
No. 1 neopest's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 duggulous's correction
面白いですね!この表現を教えてくださってありがとうございます。
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations!
I learned something new. (^^)

Uba Zakura (姥桜) Part 2

Mar 17, 2018 22:18
Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term 姥桜 (uba zakura), which is a popular name for cherry trees in which flowers bloom earlier than leaves.

Actually, "uba zakura" can also describe a woman who is past her prime but is beautiful still now.

That is to say, this term is surely a compliment.

However, since 姥 (uba) means "old lady," some Japanese people are regarding this term as an insult, such as "just a woman past her prime" or "a woman who is trying to make herself look young."

Please be careful when you use it to women.
姥桜 Part 2

昨日は、葉が出るよりも先に花が咲く桜の通称「姥桜」を紹介しました。

この「姥桜」という言葉は、盛りを過ぎてもなお美しい女性を表すこともできます。

すなわち、この言葉はれっきとした褒め言葉です。

しかし、"old lady" を意味する「姥」という文字が使われていることから、「女盛りを過ぎた女性」や「若作りをしている女性」など、悪い印象を持っている人も多くいるようです。

この言葉を女性に対して使う際は、注意して下さい。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 duggulous's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Uba Zakura (姥桜) Part 1

Mar 16, 2018 20:16
姥桜 (uba zakura) is a popular name for cherry trees in which flowers bloom earlier than leaves appear.

姥 (uba) means "old lady" and 桜 (sakura/zakura) means "cherry."

In Japanese, both "tooth" and "leaf" have the same reading -- "tooth" is 歯 (ha) and "leaf" is 葉 (ha).

That is to say, 姥桜/葉がない桜 (ha ga nai sakura - a cherry tree with no leaves) is a metaphor for 歯がない姥 (ha ga nai uba - an old lady with no teeth).

Also, "uba zakura" can be used for describing an appearance of a woman.

Imagine what it describes.
(To be continued.)
姥桜 Part 1

「姥桜」は、葉が出るよりも先に花が咲く桜の通称です。

「姥」は "old lady," 「桜」は "cherry" を意味します。

日本語では、"teeth" を意味する「歯」と、"leaf" を意味する「葉」は、同じ読みです。

歯がない姥と、葉がない桜をかけて、姥桜という言葉が生まれたというわけです。

また、姥桜は女性の容姿を形容する言葉でもあります。

どんな意味か、想像してみてください。
(明日に続く)
No. 1 Timmy's correction
Interesting! I guess "ubazakura" is not the word one should use when speaking with women)
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post! :)
Yes, it's a compliment, but some people consider it as an insult, so it's better not to use it on women.
Timmy
You're welcome!

Odabutsu (お陀仏 - Dying/Becoming Useless)

Mar 16, 2018 20:15
Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term おしゃかになる (oshaka ni naru), which means to become useless.

Actually, there is a similar term, お陀仏 (odabutsu).

"Odabutsu" means that someone dies or something becomes useless.

お (o) is a polite prefix and 陀仏 (dabutsu) is short for 阿弥陀仏 (Amidabutsu), means Amida Buddha.

In Buddhism, adherents chant a prayer 南無阿弥陀仏 (namu amidabutsu), when someone died.

This changed to "odabutsu," and now it can be not only used when someone dies but also when something becomes useless.

(Ahhh, I definitely wrote this essay on March 15th, but I couldn't publish it properly... I'm so sad.)
お陀仏

昨日は「おしゃかになる」という言葉を紹介しました。

実はよく似た言葉に「お陀仏」があります。

「お陀仏」は、人が死ぬことや、物がダメになることを意味します。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「陀仏」は「阿弥陀仏」を略したものです。

仏教では、人が死んだとき「南無阿弥陀仏」と念仏を唱えます。

これが「お陀仏」となり、人が死ぬことだけでなく物事がダメになることにも使われるようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Timmy's correction
>Ahhh, I definitely wrote this essay on March 15th, but couldn't publish it properly...

I know how you feel. It's really frustrating to see a blank space in your calendar when you write everyday.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, it's very frustrating. Actually, I made a blank space in my calendar three times so far. I think that two of them were due to network failure on Lang-8...
Timmy
You're welcome!

>I think that two of them were due to network failure on Lang-8...

It's just something that's happening all the time)

Oshaka ni Naru (おしゃかになる - Becoming Useless)

Mar 14, 2018 17:47
When things are ruined, or something is broken and become useless, we refer to it as おしゃかになる (oshaka ni naru) in Japanese.

お (o) is a polite prefix and しゃか (Shaka) is Buddha, the founder of Buddhism.

There are several theories about the etymology of this term, but the famous one is something like the following.

One day, a casting craftworker was trying to cast a statue of 阿弥陀仏 (Amida Buddha), but accidentally he cast a statue of "Shaka."
(Note that "Amida" and "Shaka" are completely different.)

Because of this, "oshaka ni naru" (becoming oshaka) has come to have the current meaning.

This term is similar to おじゃん (ojan), to which I introduced you.
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/175639051782742719229043226410411131950
おしゃかになる

何かがダメになることや、壊れて使い物にならなくなることを、「おしゃかになる」と言います。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞で、「しゃか」は仏教の開祖である釈迦のことを意味します。

語源は諸説ありますが、有名なものは以下の説です。

ある鋳物職人が阿弥陀像を鋳ようとしていましたが、誤って釈迦像を鋳てしまいました。

このことから、「おしゃか」は使い物にならなくなったものを意味するようになりました。

この言葉は、以前紹介した「おじゃん」と似ています。
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/175639051782742719229043226410411131950
No. 1 Tiger's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 Chris's correction
Thanks for teaching me a new phrase! Is it used often?
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)

It's not frequent, but I sometimes hear this term.
I think that older people tend to use it.
No. 3 prateeti's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Bonkura (ぼんくら - Idiot)

Mar 13, 2018 15:30
Yesterday I introduced you to the Japanese word 間抜け (manuke - stupid).

There is another Japanese term, ぼんくら (bonkura), which has the similar meaning of "manuke."

ぼん (bon) means "tray," but it is also a gambling term that means "gambling parlor."

くら (kura) means "dark," but it also means "careless" in the gambling field.

That is to say, "bonkura" originally represented a careless person/personality in gambling, and it has come to mean a stupid person/personality.

Since being careless could become a matter of life and death for gamblers, "bonkura" was one of the most hated personality in gambling.
ぼんくら

昨日は「間抜け」という言葉を紹介しましたが、それと似た意味を持つ言葉に「ぼんくら」があります。

「ぼん」は "tray" を意味しますが、賭博用語で「賭場」 (gambling parlor) を表します。

「くら」は "dark" を意味しますが、賭博では「目が利かない」(careless) ことを表します。

すなわち「ぼんくら」とは、賭博において不注意な人間や性格を表し、そこから間抜けな人/性格を指すようになったというわけです。

博徒において不注意であることは死活問題であるため、「ぼんくら」はもっとも嫌われた気質の一つでした。
No. 1 Tiger's correction
if Lang-8 supported it, all foreign language words are in italics.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)

> Is bonkura a person or personality?
"Bonkura" is used both as the meaning a person and personality.

Manuke (間抜け - Stupid)

Mar 12, 2018 08:49
I might be a person called 間抜け (manuke).

"Manuke" is a word referring to a foolish, stupid, or goofy person.

間 (ma) means a pause interval that is inserted between musics, actions, or lines in plays or speeches.

Also, 抜け (nuke) means "to skip something."

That is to say, "manuke" implies that you skip such intervals and go out of tune.

Because of this, it has come to mean a stupid person.

Incidentally, I found an interesting and surprising fact today.

According to an online dictionary site, there are more than 300 English terms that mean "manuke."
https://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=%E9%96%93%E6%8A%9C%E3%81%91
間抜け

私は「間抜け」かもしれません。

「間抜け」とは、愚かな人や、行動に抜かりのある人などを指す言葉です。

「間」は、芝居や演説などで、音や動作、台詞の間に入る休止のことを意味します。

そして「抜け」は、"to skip something" を意味します。

すなわち「間抜け」とは、「拍子抜けすること」や「調子が崩れること」を示唆しています。

これが転じて、考えや行動に抜かりのある人を指すようになったというわけです。

ちなみに、「間抜け」をオンラインの辞書で引くと、驚くことに相当する英単語が300個以上も出てきました。
No. 1 Pzychotix's correction
That's interesting! I had heard a different origin for 間抜け, that it came from the space between your ears being left out (i.e. your brain), so this origin is new to me.

面白い! 間抜けって違った起源を聞いた、二つの耳の間が抜けてしまったということで、その話が聞いたことない。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I didn't know the theory of the origin for 間抜け, thank you for letting me know that. :)
No. 2 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 3 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you for the comment!
I think that there are many slang/old-fashioned terms in the site.

Bureikou (無礼講 - Unrestricted Binge)

Mar 11, 2018 16:31
There is a drinking party called 無礼講 (bureikou) in Japan.

無 (bu) means "nothing" and 礼講 "reikou" means a kind of ritual that respects courtesies and protocols.

The combination, "bureikou," meant a drinking party that was held after "reikou," and it has become a famous term meaning a drinking party that people don't care the difference in status, courtesy or protocols.

Since "bureikou" can be divided into 無礼 (burei - rudeness) and 講 (kou - not care), so some people think that "bureikou" means a drinking party that people can be rude to their boss.

However, of course this thought is wrong.
無礼講

日本で行われる宴会には、「無礼講」と呼ばれるものがあります。

「礼講」は「身分をはっきとして、儀礼や手順を重んじる儀式」のことを指します。

そして「無礼講」は「礼講」の二次会的に行われる宴会のことで、「身分や儀礼を取り払った気楽な宴会」を意味する言葉として広まりました。

「無礼講」は「無礼」と「構」に分けることができることから、「上司に無礼を働いても構わない宴会」と勘違いする人がいますが、間違っているので注意して下さい。
No. 1 klegrant's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I learned something new :)
No. 2 Amop567's correction
Nice explanation. Just in time for enkai season ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

IIdashippe (言い出しっぺ - The First One to Say Something)

Mar 10, 2018 15:56
A person who says something firstly is called 言い出しっぺ (iidashippe) in Japanese.

言い出し (iidashi) means "to start saying something" or "to bring something up," and ペ (pe) means "fart."

This term comes from the rule of thumb that a person who says "it stinks" firstly must be the one who farted.

Because of this, "iidashippe" is often used when someone insists that a person who brought something up firstly should take on the responsibility.

This thought is sometimes referred to as 言い出しっぺの法則 (iidashippe no housoku - the rule of iidashippe).
言い出しっぺ

何かを最初に言い出した人のことを、日本語で「言い出しっぺ」と言います。

「言い出し」は "to start saying," 「ぺ」は「屁」すなわち "fart" を意味します。

この言葉は、「最初に臭い(すなわち誰かが放屁した)と言い出した人こそ、犯人であるに違いない」という経験則から生まれました。

このことから「言い出しっぺ」は、何か言い出した人が責任を負うべきだと主張する際によく使われます。

特にこの理念のことを「言い出しっぺの法則」ということもあります。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Thank you! How can I use it in a sentence?
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
例えば、次のように使うことができます。
「言い出しっぺの君が、まずやるべきだ。」 (You should do it first, because you're the one who brought it up.)
No. 2 James's correction
It's amazing how despite different cultures, people seem to generally share the same way of thinking in certain situations.

As someone else said, in English, there's an expression ("He who smelt it, dealt it") for suggesting that the person who makes the first comment about a fart is the one who did it.

Funny.
Toru
Thank you for the comment!
Yes, it's quite interesting that there are similar thinking and proverbs among different countries/cultures.
No. 3 klegrant's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Gota Gota (ごたごた - Jumbling)

Mar 9, 2018 05:01
A situation where something jumbles disorderly or a bothersome thing is referred to as ごたごた (gota gota) in Japanese.

I think that most Japanese people believe that "gota gota" is an onomatopoeia representing that things are jumbled.

However, this term comes from 兀庵普寧 (Gottan Funei), Zen Monk, who was invited from 宋 (Sou ie Song) in the Kamakura Period.

Gottan had a free-minded thinking but was an argumentative person, so it seemed that his preaching was complicated and very difficult to understand.

Because of this, jumbling was called 兀庵兀庵する (Gottan Gottan suru), and it has come to become "gota gota."
ごたごた

無秩序に乱れるさまや、面倒くさい事柄のことを、「ごたごた」と言います。

多くの日本人は「ごたごた」のことを、物が乱れているさまを表す擬態語だと考えていると思います。

しかしこの言葉は、鎌倉時代に宋から招かれた禅僧・兀庵普寧(ごったんふねい)の名前に由来します。

兀庵は自由な発想を持つ反面理屈屋で、彼の説法は複雑でわかりにくかったそうです。

このことから、こんがらがることを「兀庵兀庵する」と言うようになり、後に「ごたごた」となったそうです。
No. 1 Steph's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Tekozuru (てこずる - Having Trouble with Something)

Mar 8, 2018 14:10
When you cannot handle something and have trouble with it, we express it using the Japanese verb てこずる (tekozuru).

There are several theories about the etymology of "tekozuru."

According to a theory, てこ (teko) means "leverage" and ずる (zuru) means "to slither."

In this theory, "tekozuru" comes from the situation where even if you tried to move something using the power of leverage, it slithered and didn't work.

According to another theory, "teko" means "helper" and "zuru" means "to trouble someone."

In this theory, "tekozuru" comes from the situation where you needed a helpers and troubled him/her.
てこずる

うまく処理できないで困ることや、扱いきれず持て余すことを、日本語で「てこずる」と言います。

「てこずる」の語源には、幾つかの説があります。

ある説は、「てこ」は "leverage," 「ずる」は "to slither" を意味し、「てこずる」は「てこで何かを動かそうとしても滑ってうまくいかないこと」が語源だとしています。

またある説では、「てこ」は "helper," 「ずる」は "to trouble someone" を意味し、「てこずる」は「手助けの人さえも煩わせるようなこと」が語源だとしています。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
ありがとうございます。使ってみます。

就活に手こずるよ!(>人<;)
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!

> 就活に手こずるよ!(>人<;)
Good job!
もしあなたが就活中なのであれば、「就活に手こずっているよ」としたほうがより自然です :)
artboy598
ありがとうございます!

Eshaku (会釈 - Bow/Nod)

Mar 7, 2018 23:39
Japanese people often do an act called 会釈 (eshaku), when they pass/meet their boss or acquaintance.

"Eshaku" refers to bow or nod that is done to express your familiarity, favor, or appreciation to others.

This word is short for 和会通釈 (waetsūshaku), the Buddhist terminology, which originally meant "to compare two doctrines that sound contradictory each other and reveal the underlying true significance."

This came to mean "to behave by considering others' hearts," and now it has come to mean bow or nod.

Incidentally, it is said that the rough standard angle of your upper body when you do "eshaku" is fifteen degrees.
会釈

日本人は、上司や知り合いとすれ違うとき、よく「会釈(えしゃく)」をします。

「会釈」とは、人に対する親しみや好意、謝意を表すため、軽く頭を下げる動作のことを指します。

この言葉は仏教用語の「和会通釈」の略で、もともとは「互いに矛盾に見える教説を照合し、その根本にある真義を明らかにすること」を意味していました。

これが、「相手の心を推し量って考慮すること」を意味するようになり、さらには現在の「お辞儀」の意味を持つようになりました。

ちなみに、会釈の際に体を傾ける角度の目安は15度だそうです。
No. 1 fagie37's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)

Shinogi wo Kezuru (しのぎを削る - Going Head-to-Head)

Mar 6, 2018 10:23
When you engage in fierce competition, we describe it as しのぎを削る (shinogi wo kezuru) in Japanese.

しのぎ (shinogi) means a ridge between 刃 (ha - edge) and 峰 (mine - blunt edge) of a Japanese sword, and 削る (kezuru) means to scrape something.

Therefore, the literal meaning of "shinogi wo kezuru" is to scrape a ridge of a sword.

In a normal sword fight, "shinogi" (ridge) of a sword would not be scraped, so scraping "shinogi" implies that it is a very fierce fight.

Originally, this term was used for a sword fight, but it has come to be used for various fierce fight or competition.
しのぎを削る

両者が互いに力を出し、激しく争うことを、日本語で「しのぎを削る」と言います。

「しのぎ」は、刀の刃と峰の中間部分の、少し盛り上がっているところを指します。

この部分が削り取られるということは、よほど激しく刀をぶつけて切り合っているということです。

もともとは刀を使った争いに対して使われた言葉でしたが、後に意味が広がり、さまざまな激しい争いに対しても使われるようになりました。


No. 1 ogicu8abruok's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 klegrant's correction
Hello....After looking at the Japanese, I just thought I would try to improve that one sentence and try to make it a little more accurate.....I would appreciate your comments as to whether you think I am accurate or not. Nice Japanese expression by the way.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I think that your sentence is exactly what I wanted to say. However, I don't know whether or not "narrowly miss" is appropriate as a translation of 削る (kezuru). The meaning of "kezuru" is explained in the following URL:
http://www.romajidesu.com/dictionary/meaning-of-%E5%89%8A%E3%82%8B.html
Among them, I thought that "to scrape off" is suitable in my essay.

Muzu Muzu (むずむず - Itching)

Mar 5, 2018 15:59
Now my nose is a state expressed as the Japanese term むずむず (muzu muzu).

"Muzu muzu" is a kind of onomatopoeia, and it has mainly two different meanings.

One is that you are impatient to do something.

When you want to mean this, you can also use another onomatopoeia うずうず (uzu uzu) instead of "muzu muzu."

The other meaning is that insects are crawling, and you feel such a feeling at a part of your body.

For example, when your nose is itchy, you can say 鼻がむずむずする (hana ga muzu muzu suru - my nose is a state of "muzu muzu").

When I was writing this article, I found that the English word "itchy" can express the above two meanings of "muzu muzu."
むずむず

私は今、鼻が「むずむず」します。

「むずむず」は擬態語の一つで、大きく二つの意味を持ちます。

一つは、やる気に満ち溢れていたり、何かをやりたいのにできなくて、落ち着かないさまです。

この意味の時は、「うずうず」と言うこともあります。

もう一つは、虫がうごめくさま、そしてそのような感触がして体の一部がかゆいさまです。

例えば鼻がかゆいとき、「鼻がむずむずする」のように使います。

私はこの記事を書いていて、英語の "itchy" が「むずむず」の二つの意味をどちらも表せることに気が付きました。
No. 1 Timmy's correction
Interesting! It seems that the spring allergy season in Japan has already started)
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
Yes, that's right. Unfortunately I'm allergic to cedar pollen.
Timmy
You're welcome!
No. 2 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Ikki Ichiyū (一喜一憂 - Alternate Joy and Despair)

Mar 4, 2018 12:46
Today I saw a person who has a feeling called 一喜一憂 (ikki ichiyū).

"Ikki ichiyū" means that you alternate between joy and despair every time things or situations change a bit.

一喜 (ikki) means "one joy" and 一憂 (ichiyū) means "one despair," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "one joy and one despair."

According to Wiktionary, it is expressed as "a feeling swinging back and forth between joy and despair."

Since people who have such a feeling are easy to be affected from surroundings, this idiom is usually used as a bad meaning.

However, I think that 一喜一憂する人 (ikki ichiyū suru hito - people who have "ikki ichiyū") are pure in heart.
一喜一憂

今日、私は「一喜一憂」する人を見ました。

「一喜一憂」とは、物事の状況が少し変化するたびに、喜んだり心配したりすることを意味する言葉です。

「一喜」は "one joy," 「一憂」は "one despair/fear" を意味します。

すなわち「一喜一憂」を直訳すると、 "one joy and one despair" となります。

Wiktionary によると、"a feeling swinging back and forth between joy and despair" と訳されていました。

基本的にこの言葉は、物事にや状況に振り回されるという悪い意味で使わることが多いです。

ただ私は、「一喜一憂する人」は、純粋な心を持つ人だとも思います。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Interesting. Thanks!
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! (^^)

Kisaku (気さく - Frank)

Mar 3, 2018 13:19
We express people who have frank or companionable character using the Japanese term 気さく (kisaku).

"Kisaku" comes from an archaic Japanese adjective さくい (sakui), which means that something is light or frail.

By adding 気 (ki), which means "character" or "disposition," to the stem of "sakui," the adjective verb "kisaku" was created.

Also, さく (saku) in "sakui" means remaining residues after whittling woods.

Since such wood chips are very light, it has come to mean light and frank personalities.

I hope that sometime the number of 気さくな人 (kisaku na hito - a person who have a "kisaku" personality) will increase in the world.
気さく

さっぱりしていて、物事にこだわらない性格の人のことを、「気さく」と表現することがあります。

「気さく」は、淡白であることやもろいことを表す古語の形容詞「さくい」に由来します。

「さくい」の語幹に "character" や "disposition" を意味する「気」をつけて、「気さく」になったというわけです。

また、「さくい」の「さく」は木を削った後の残りカスを意味します。

木屑はとても軽いことから、「さっぱりと軽い性格」を表すようになったものだと考えられます。

私は世の中に「気さくな人」が増えることを望んでいます。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Very good explanation! Thank you very much for the lesson!
Toru
Thank you very much for your corrections! (^^)

Tokoton (とことん - Thoroughly)

Mar 2, 2018 11:22
When you want to express the end of things or doing something thoroughly, you can use the Japanese term とことん (tokoton).

This term comes from the rhythmic stepping sound トコトントコトン (tokoton tokoton), which represents a Japanese dance.

There are two theories about the etymology of this sound -- one says that "toko" means "floor" and "ton" is an onomatopoeia that represents the stepping sound, and the other says that "tokoton" itself is the onomatopoeia.

Also, the reason why "tokoton" has come to have the current meaning is because the Japanese military song とことんやれ節 (tokoton yare bushi) had become popular in 1868.

Where やれ (yare) means "do it," and 節 (bushi) means "melody."

It's thought that since the discipline of the military was very strict, "tokoton yare" (tokoton do it) was considered as "do it thoroughly until the end."
とことん

物事の最後の最後や、徹底的に何かをすることを表す時、「とことん」という日本語を使うことがあります。

この言葉は、日本舞踊を表現する「トコトントコトン」というリズミカルな足拍子の音に由来します。

この足拍子には、「トコ」は「床」を意味し「トン」のみが擬音だとする説と、「トコトン」自体が擬音だとする説がありますが、正確なことはわかっていません。

そして、「トコトン」が現在の意味を持つようになった理由は、1868年に流行した軍歌「とことんやれ節」に由来します。

「やれ」は "do it," 「節」は "melody" を意味します。

軍の規律の厳しさから、「とことんやれ」が「最後まで徹底的にやれ」のような意味に捉えらたものと考えられます。
No. 1 Feronya's correction
Your English writing skills are amazing! Such a great sense of sentence composition, as well as grammar and words usage! You also have a very well put vocabulary, which is a great asset to have. Keep up with your consistent efforts!
Feronya
Besides, I found it interesting reading your post. Japanese Onomatopoeias are my weak point!
Thank you for writing about it!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and helpful comments!
I'm glad to hear you say that :)

> I believe because of the wooden shoes they wear when dancing traditional Japanese dances. Is it?
日本舞踊 (nihon buyō) is indeed a kind of traditional Japanese dances, but as far as I know, actors wear 足袋 (tabi - split-toe socks), not wooden shoes. Of course, socks don't make clear stepping sounds. Note that Japanese people tend to express various things by using onomatopoeia, even if it doesn't make a sound.

> I got caught on it too, but in English sentence structure it is safer to not use things like: "--" ":" etc. Also, if you can spit one big sentence into 2 separate ones ALWAYS do it. ;)
Thank you for the explanation, I understand well. :)
Please let me ask one question. If these listed elements were words (not sentences), would it be recommended to use "--" or ":" etc.? (E.g., "There are three types: A, B, and C.")

Tawakemono (たわけ者 - Fool)

Mar 1, 2018 18:23
Unfortunately, there are many たわけ者 (tawakemono) in the world.

"Tawakemono" is a word that refers to a foolish person or a joker.

たわけ (tawake) comes from the verb たわく/たわける (tawaku/tawakeru), which means to do something foolish/stupid thing, and 者 (mono) means a person.

Also, there is another theory about the etymology of "tawake" -- it comes from 田分け (tawake),

田 (ta) means "field" and 分け (wake) means "to divide something," so its meaning when being written by these kanji is "to divide a field."

If you divide your field to your children, and your children divide the field to your grandchildren, someday the amount of harvest will be reduced due to the narrow area, and the family line will fall into a decline.

That is to say, this theory implies that people who do such an act is foolish.
たわけ者

残念なことに、世の中には多くの「たわけ者」が存在します。

「たわけ者」は、愚かな人や、ふざけた人のことを指す言葉です。

「たわけ者」の「たわけ」は、ばかげたことやふざけたことをすることを意味する動詞「たわく」もしくは「たわける」を名詞化したもので、「者」は人を表します。

また、「たわけ」は「田分け」から来ているという説もあります。

「田」は "field," 「分け」は "to divide something" を意味するので、この漢字を使ったときの「田分け」の意味は "to divide fields" となります。

遺産相続の度に子どもに田畑を分け与えていくと、いずれ面積がどんどん狭くなり、少量の収穫しか得られず家系が衰退します。

そのようなことをするのは愚かであるというわけです。
No. 1 John_Doe's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 Rachel's correction
Etymology is always interesting!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
Yes, that's exactly right :)

Datsubou (脱帽 - Taking One's Hat Off)

Feb 28, 2018 15:45
There is a Japanese term: 脱帽 (datsubou).

脱 (datsu) means "to take off" and 帽 (bou) means "hat," so the literal meaning of the combination is "to take one's hat off."

Interestingly, the Japanese term "datsubou" and its literal English translation "to take one's hat off" have almost the same meaning.

That is to say, "datsubou" means to be impressive by someone or admire someone for an achievement.

Also, "datsubou" can mean a feeling of giving up in addition to the above meanings.

Normally, this term is used like 脱帽する (datsubou suru) by adding する (suru), which can convert a noun into a verb.
脱帽

日本語には、「脱帽」という表現があります。

「脱」は "to take off," 「帽」は "hat" を意味するので、「脱帽」の文字通りの意味は "to take one's hat" となります。

面白いことに、日本語の「脱帽」と、その直訳である英語の "to take one's hat" は、ほとんど同じ意味を持ちます。

すなわち、どちらも誰かに敬意を表してかぶっている帽子を脱ぐことや、相手に感服することを意味するわけです。

また、日本語の「脱帽」は上記の意味に加えて、降参の意を表すこともあります。

基本的には、名詞を動詞化する「する」を付けて、「脱帽する」のように使われます。
No. 1 Shurup's correction
Cool! It's pretty interesting how two completely different languages can have this weird phrase in common!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, it's weird but very interesting. :)

Posharu (ポシャる - Falling Through)

Feb 27, 2018 11:31
Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term "ojan," which means that a plan or a thing goes up in smoke.

Today I'd like to talk about the slang term ポシャる (posharu), which has almost the same meaning of "ojan."

It is thought that "posharu" comes from the French word "chapeau," which means "hat."

By swapping the pronunciation of "chapeau" and adding the suffix る (ru) that can convert a noun into a verb, the verb "posharu" was created.

The reason why "posharu" has come to its current meaning is because taking off a 兜 (kabuto - helmet) meant giving up and people viewed the kabuto as the closest thing to a hat.
ポシャる

昨日は、計画などが途中で駄目になることを意味する「おじゃん」という言葉を紹介しました。

今日は、「おじゃん」とほぼ同じ意味で用いられる俗語「ポシャる」を紹介します。

「ポシャる」は、フランス語で帽子を意味する「シャッポ (chapeau)」から来ていると考えられています。

「シャッポ」の前後を入れ替え、名詞を動詞化する接尾語「る」をつけることで、「ポシャる」となったというわけです。

現在の意味を持つようになったのは、日本では「兜を脱ぐ」が「降参する」ことを意味し、「兜」を「帽子」に見立てたためであると考えられます。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
good
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my posy! (^^)

Ojan (おじゃん - Falling Through)

Feb 26, 2018 11:12
When a plan or a thing goes up in smoke, we refers to it as おじゃん (ojan) or おじゃんになる (ojan ni naru - becoming ojan) in Japanese.

お (o) is a polite suffix, and it's thought that じゃん (jan) comes from an onomatopoeia.

In the Edo period in Japan, when a fire broke out, people rang 半鐘 (hansho - fire bell) to let surrounding people know the fire.

Also, when all the fire was extinguished, people rang the hansho twice at a short interval.

This sound was represented as じゃんじゃん (jan jan), and it changed to the term "ojan."

At that time, since wooden houses were built in a row, we had to broke houses around a burning house to prevent the fire from spreading.

I think that the term "ojan" is exactly suitable for the scene.
おじゃん

計画や物事が途中で駄目になることを、日本語で「おじゃん」や「おじゃんになる」と言います。

「お」は丁寧の接頭語、そして「じゃん」は擬音から来た言葉だと考えられています。

日本では江戸時代、火事が発生すると、半鐘を鳴らして周囲に知らせました。

そして無事に鎮火した際には、半鐘を短く2回鳴らしていたそうです。

このときの半鐘を短く鳴らす音を「じゃんじゃん」と表現し、そこから「おじゃん」という言葉ができたというわけです。

かつては木造の家が連なっていたので、類焼を防ぐために、燃えている周囲の家まで叩き壊していたそうです。

その光景は、まさに「おじゃん」という言葉が当てはまります。
No. 1 tony's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I'm sorry for my elementary mistakes.
tony
いいえ、どういたしまして。

Unagi Nobori (うなぎのぼり - Spiral Rise)

Feb 25, 2018 13:47
When something such as price or status rises rapidly, we express the phenomenon by using the metaphor, うなぎのぼり (unagi nobori).

うなぎ (unagi) means "eel" and のぼり "nobori" means "to rise," so the literal meaning of "uangi nobori" is "an eel rises."

The most accepted theory about its etymology comes from the fact that since the bodies of eels are slimy, even if you try to grab them, they keep rising while slipping through your hands.

Also, there is another theory, which comes from the fact that eels can ascend rapid streams.

However, if this theory would be right, I think that "salmon" would be more appropriate than "eel."
うなぎのぼり

物価や地位など、何かが急速に上昇していくことを、日本語で「うなぎのぼり」と表現することがあります。

「うなぎ」は "eel," 「のぼり」は "to rise" を意味します。

語源はとしては、うなぎの体はぬるぬるしていて、掴もうとしても上に登るばかりだからという説が有力です。

語源にはもう一つ、うなぎは急流でもさかのぼることができるから、という説もあります。

しかし、その場合は「うなぎ」ではなく「鮭」を使ったほうが的確かもしれません。
No. 1 Brent's correction
That's very interesting! I remember hearing a joke with うなぎのぼり and not getting it when I saw it. Now I totally understand it though!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I'm glad to hear you say that :)

Itadaki Dachi (いただき立ち)

Feb 24, 2018 17:01
Yesterday, I introduced you to the word "oitoma," which is used when you leave a house you're visiting.

Today I'd like to talk about いただき立ち (itadaki dachi), which can be used in a similar situation.

いただき (itadaki) means "to receive," 立ち (tachi) means "to stand," and the combination means to go home (leave the house) soon after givin a meal or drink.

This term is often used in conjunction with "oitoma," just something like いただき立ちで失礼ですが、そろそろおいとまさせて頂きます (itadaki dachi de shitsurei desuga, sorosoro oitoma sasete itadakimasu - I'm sorry for "itadaki dachi," but it's time for me to leave).

"Itadaki dachi" is used when you have to leave a house soon after having a meal, but in such a case, you should say no to the host before serving the meal at least once.
いただき立ち

昨日は、訪問先から帰る時に言う言葉「おいとま」を紹介しました。

今日は似たような状況で使える「いただき立ち」を紹介します。

「いただき」は "to receive"、「立ち」は "to stand" を意味します。

そして「いただき立ち」は、訪問先で飲食をごちそうになった後、すぐに帰ることを意味します。

「おいとま」と組み合わせて「いただき立ちで失礼ですが、そろそろおいとまさせて頂きます」のように言います。

時間がなくてすぐに帰らなければいけないときに使うわけですが、そのような場合は少なくとも一回、食事を遠慮したほうが良いかもしれません。
No. 1 Timmy's correction
Interesting! I've heard that in some countries refusing food when you're a guest can be considered as an insult, and people often go out on an empty stomach just not to complicate things.
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
Your information is really interesting. In some regions in Japan, suggesting a meal implies a feeling that the host wants you to go home.
Timmy
You're welcome!

>Your information is really interesting. In some regions in Japan, suggesting a meal implies a >feeling that the host wants you to go home.

Oh really. I didn't know that. All I can say that this is a very unique way of sending off unwelcomed guests.

Oitoma (おいとま - Leaving)

Feb 23, 2018 16:44
Over the past two days, I introduced you to the Japanese terms that related to service to visitors.

Today I'd like to talk about おいとま (oitoma), which is used by the visitor when he/she leaves the home.

"Oitoma" and its verb form "oitoma suru" are used as a euphemism for the verb 帰る (kaeru), which means to "go home."

お (o) is a polite prefix, and いとま (itoma) means "free time" or "recess time."

Also, originally this term was used like "itoma wo chodai suru" (いとまを頂戴する - I will receive "itoma").

Receiving "itoma" means receiving "free time," and it implies that you will go home.

Later, just "itoma" and "itoma suru" have come to mean "I'm gone."

Usually, we say just something like そろそろ、おいとまさせて頂きます (sorosoro, oitoma sasete itadakimasu - It's time for me to leave).
おいとま

昨日と一昨日は、来客の対応に関する言葉を紹介しました。

今日は、あなたが客だったとして、帰る時に言う言葉「おいとま」を紹介します。

「おいとま」およびその動詞形の「おいとまする」は、「帰る」の婉曲表現として謙譲語的に用いられます。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「いとま」は「ひま」や「休む時間」を意味します。

そして、この言葉はもともと「いとまを頂戴する」のように使われていました。

「いとま」を頂くということは、「時間」を頂くことであり、それは「帰る」ことにも繋がります。

これが、「いとま」や「いとまする」だけでも「帰る」を意味するようになったというわけです。

通常は、「そろそろ、おいとまさせて頂きます」のように使います。
No. 1 Timmy's correction
Interesting! Sometimes it is better to leave early rather than wait to the last minute.
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
Yes, that's exactly right. :)

Omotase (お持たせ)

Feb 22, 2018 17:18
Yesterday, I introduced you to the word 空茶 (karacha), which means to serve green tea without refreshments.

This word is often used when a visitor comes to your home suddenly and you don't have refreshments to serve.

However, visitors might sometimes bring gifts that could be refreshments.

If you don't prepare anything, you will serve tea with the refreshments that is given by the visitor.

In this case, the host will say お持たせで失礼ですが (omotase de shitsurei desuga - Forgive me, this is "omotase") while serving tea and the gift.

お持たせ (omotase) is a causative noun form of the verb 持つ (motsu), which means to bring, and it expresses a gift by a visitor.

Note that there are a little differences between "omotase" and 土産 (miyage).

You can find the explanation of "miyage" in the following URL.
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/246116190267681232220520186508890375214
お持たせ

昨日は、お茶菓子を添えずに出すお茶を意味する「空茶」という言葉を紹介しました。

これは、急な来客でお茶菓子が出せないときに使われる言葉です。

しかし、来客がお土産として、お茶菓子になり得るものを持ってきてくれることがあります。

もし準備していたお茶菓子が無かったら、来客が持ってきたお茶菓子をすぐに開封し、お茶に添えて出します。

このとき、「お持たせで失礼ですが・・・」のように言います。

「お持たせ」は、「持つ」の使役を名詞化したもので、来客を敬って土産物を指す際に使われます。

「お持たせ」と「土産」では少し意味が異なるので注意して下さい。

「土産」については以下のリンクで説明しています。
No. 1 gill's correction
詳しいですね。
日常の重要な礼
Toru
Thank you for the comment!
来客から頂いたお茶菓子を、一緒に食べることは問題ありません。
ただ、開封はお客の見えないところでして、「お持たせですが」と言いながらお茶と一緒に持ってくるのが礼儀正しいと思います。
gill
そうですか。
答えてくれてありがとうございます。
以後日本へ行けばもっと注意するはー
No. 2 klegrant's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Karacha (空茶)

Feb 21, 2018 12:03
When treating visitors in Japan, we often serve green tea with refreshments (Japanese confectionery).

However, if the visitor came to your home suddenly, you might not be able to serve refreshments.

In such a case, you should serve only green tea, and say 空茶でごめんなさい (karacha de gomennasai - I'm sorry, it's 'karacha').

空 (kara) means "empty" and 茶 (cha) means "(green) tea," but it doesn't mean that the teacup is empty.

"Karacha" means (green) tea that is served without refreshments.

If you are said as "I'm sorry, it's karacha," it will be better to express your feeling of apology toward the sudden visit.
空茶

日本では来客をもてなすとき、お茶にお茶菓子を添えて出します。

しかし、急な来客の場合はお茶菓子が無く、お茶だけを出すこともあります。

そのようなとき、「空茶でごめんなさい」のように言います。

「空」は "empty," 「茶」は "tea" を意味しますが、「お茶が空っぽ」という意味ではありません。

「空茶」は「お茶菓子が添えられていないお茶」を意味します。

もし「空茶でごめんなさい」のように言われたら、急に訪れたことを詫びる気持ちを伝えましょう。
No. 1 Steph's correction
Toru
  • If you are said as say "I'm sorry, it's karacha," it will be better a good way to express your feeling of apology toward the sudden visit.
Thank you so much for the correction!

> If you say "...
In this sentence, I assumed a situation that you visit a home suddenly and the host serves tea while saying "I'm sorry, it's karacha."

> it will a good way ...
I think that "be" is necessary here. Is my thought right?
Steph
You're welcome! :) I really liked your writing, and your grammar is really good!

Oh you're right!! Yes, there should be a "be" there! :)
Toru
Thank you for the comment!
I understand well :)
No. 2 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 3 Fifi's correction
Interesting!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comment! (^^)

Happou Bijin (八方美人 - Everybody's Friend)

Feb 20, 2018 10:58
A woman who tries to please everybody is called 八方美人 (happou bijin) in Japanese.

八方 (happou) means "eight directions" and 美人 (bijin) means "beautiful woman."

Here the eight directions represent "north," "northeast," "east," "southeast," "south," "southwest," "west," and "northwest," so the literal meaning of "happou bijin" is a woman who is beautiful from any direction.

However, the "bijin" implies a person with a beautiful attitude towards others, not a woman with a beautiful face.

That is to say, "happou bijin" means a person who tries to be all things to all people.

It might sound like a good meaning, but note that this term is often used in an ironic meaning.
八方美人

誰に対しても如才なくふるまう人のことを、日本語で「八方美人」と言います。

「八方」は "eight directions," 「美人」は "beautiful woman" を意味します。

ここで「八方」は「北」「北東」「東」「南東」「南」「南西」「西」「北西」のことであり、「八方美人」の文字どおりの意味は「どのほうこうから見ても欠点のない美人」です。

ただし、この「美人」は顔が美しい人という意味ではなく、他人に対する態度のことを指しています。

すなわち「八方美人」は、「誰からも好かれるように上手くふるまう人」のことを表します。

これだけ聞くと良い意味に聞こえるかもしれませんが、皮肉を込めて使われることも多いので注意して下さい。
No. 1 Chan's correction
I learned a new word today, thank you! ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 outdoors's correction
Sometimes we call that a "people pleaser".
Toru
Thank you so much for letting me know the term!
I learned something new :)

Shiku Hakku (四苦八苦 - Struggling to Do)

Feb 19, 2018 15:01
Struggling to do something or floundering is called 四苦八苦 (shiku hakku) in Japanese.

四 means "four," 苦 means "suffering," and 八 means "eight," so the literal meaning of "shiku hakku" is "four sufferings, eight sufferings."

Originally, this term meant every suffering in Buddhism.

"Shiku" represents four sufferings caused by -- "live," "old," "disease," and "death."

"Hakku" represents four additional sufferings caused by -- "separating from your loved one," "meeting with a hateful person," "things that you can't obtain," and "a fact that you can't control your body and spirit as you think."

For example, you can say 四苦八苦する (shiku hakku suru) to mean that you struggle to do something.
四苦八苦

ものすごく苦労することや、非常に苦しいことを、日本語で「四苦八苦」と言います。

「四」は "four," 「苦」は "suffering," 「八」は "eight" を意味するので、この言葉の文字どおりの意味は "four sufferings, eight sufferings" となります。

もともとこの言葉は、仏教においてあらゆる苦しみを意味するものでした。

「四苦」は「生」、「老」、「病」、「死」の4つの苦しみを表します。

「八苦」では上記の4つの苦しみに加えて、「愛別離苦(愛する者と別離する苦しみ)」、「怨憎会苦(恨み憎んでいる者に会う苦しみ)」、「求不得苦(求めるものが得られない苦しみ)」、「五蘊盛苦(人間の肉体と精神が思うがままにならない苦しみ)」を表します。

例えば「四苦八苦する」のように使われます。
No. 1 zzymyn's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Wakai Tsubame (若いツバメ - Toy Boy)

Feb 18, 2018 16:07
We sometimes refers to a young man who is a lover with older woman as 若いツバメ (wakai tsubame).

若い (wakai) means "young" and ツバメ means "swallow," so the literal meaning of "wakai tsubame" is "young swallow."

This term comes from a romantic relationship between Raicho Hiratsuka, a pioneering Japanese feminist, and Hiroshi Okumura, a young artist.

Okumura called Hiratsuka "wakai tsubame" or 弟 (otouto - younger brother).

However, this relationship was not good for Hiratsuka's activity that insists women's liberation.

For this reason, Hiratsuka decided to break up with Okumura, and sent a message something like "a young swallow flies away for the peace of a pond."

This words became famous, and "wakai tsubame" came to have the current meaning.
若いツバメ

年上の女性の愛人である若い男性のことを、「若いツバメ」と言うことがあります。

「若い」は "young," 「ツバメ」は "swallow" を意味するので、「若いツバメ」の文字通りの意味は "young swallow" です。

この言葉は、明治時代の婦人運動家である平塚雷鳥と、年下の若い画家である奥村博史の恋愛に由来します。

平塚は奥村のことを、「若いツバメ」や「弟」と呼んでいました。

しかし二人の関係は、女性解放を謳う平塚の活動において、あまり好ましいものではありませんでした。

そして平塚は奥村と別れることを決意し、「若いツバメは池の平和のために飛び去っていく」と綴りました。

この言葉が有名になり、「若いツバメ」は現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Riko's correction
Toru
  • These words became famous, and "wakai tsubame" came to have it's current meaning.
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

I have a question. I think that "its" should have been used instead of "it's" in the last sentence. Is this thought right?
Riko
Oops! You're right. It should be "its". Thanks for catching my mistake.
Toru
I understand well, thank you again! :)
No. 2 Ayman's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 3 outdoors's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

Udsagi Goya (ウサギ小屋 - Rabbit Hutch)

Feb 17, 2018 21:34
Japanese houses are sometimes described as ウサギ小屋 (usagi goya), the literal meaning of which is "rabbit hutch."

The reason is very simple -- it's because houses where Japanese live are basically narrow.

An informal report, issued by EC (European Communities) in 1979, said that Japanese houses are "cage a lapins" (narrow collective housing).

The literal translation of "cage a lapins" is ”usagi goya” (rabbit hutch), and this term has become popular as an ironic sense.

Indeed, in big cities such as Tokyo, the land is expensive and houses are very narrow.

However, I heard that the average site area of Japanese houses is similar to those of European countries.

(Of course it's narrow compared with houses of the US.)
ウサギ小屋

日本の家は、「ウサギ小屋」と形容されることがあります。

理由はとても単純で、日本人の住む家は基本的に狭いからです。

1979年、ECが出した非公式報告書では、"cage a lapins" (都市型の集合住宅) と表現されました。

この直訳の「ウサギ小屋」が、日本では自嘲の意味を込めた流行語となったというわけです。

確かに、東京などの都市では土地が高く、狭い家が多いです。

しかし、日本全体の平均値を見ると、ヨーロッパ諸国の家の広さとさほど変わりないようです。
(もちろんアメリカと比べると、狭いです。)
No. 1 Chanteru's correction
Overall, your post is very easy to comprehend. I found the topic interesting as well. :)

The corrections I made are just suggestions to make the writing a little more natural, but your original writing style is fine as well.

On another note, your use of the term "hutch" is okay, but in my experience, the term "hut" is used more frequently. They seem to be synonymous, so perhaps you can use them interchangeably in this context. I'm speaking as someone who uses American English though. Maybe "hutch" is more commonly used in British English. :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and explanation!
I learned something new :)

Snowboarding and Skiing

Feb 16, 2018 20:19
I've been a snow mountain since yesterday due to my work.

Yesterday, I tried to do snowboarding.

Since I had little experience about snowboarding, I tipped over many times, but finally I somehow managed to be able to turn continuously.

Unfortunately, I felt a severe muscle pain, I thought that I couldn't do snowboarding today.

Instead, I skied because I thought that skiing is less influence to the body.

It was my first skiing in about 18 years, but I remembered how to ski somewhat, so it was fun.

I also fun very nice hot springs.

I will ski again tomorrow.
スノーボードとスキー

仕事の関係で、昨日から雪山に来ています。

昨日はスノーボードをすべりました。

ほとんど経験が無かったので、何度も転びましたが、最終的にはなんとか連続でターンができるようになりました。

しかし今日は筋肉痛で、まともに滑れそうにありませんでした。

その代わりに、体への負担が少ないと思われるスキーを滑りました。

約18年ぶりのスキーでしたが、ある程度滑り方を覚えていたようで、楽しく滑ることができました。
No. 1 Mario 魏汉杰's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)
No. 2 Russell's correction
Good job! This was a nice essay. It was very easy to understand and I enjoyed it because I like to ski and snowboard. You have a solid understanding of the basics and you were able to express yourself well. I mostly made corrections to help you sound more natural. Be sure to remember the preposition "at." It can make a big difference, especially if there isn't much context around what you are saying or writing. I tried to provide helpful examples to show you why I made the corrections I did. If you have any questions about what I wrote, please send me a message.

Keep up the great work and have a great time skiing!
Toru
Thank you very much for your helpful corrections and comments!
I understand well. And I learned lots of new things.

> This should be separated into two sentences. The first sentence is correct as is. But I don't know if it is what you mean.

I think that the word "sore" you suggested is appropriate. Also, I forgot to add a conjunction like "so" or "since." I wanted to say something like "Since I had sore muscles, I thought that I wouldn't be able to snowboard."

> I'm not sure what you meant here so I guessed. The word fun always requires a verb (to have fun, to be fun, to look fun).
Sorry, my sentence, "I also fun," was terrible. I wanted to say something like "I also enjoyed a very nice hot springs." I think that the meaning of this is similar to the one of your correction.
I don't know whether or not I should add "at" in this case, like "I enjoyed at a hot springs," but I enjoyed the hot springs itself, so maybe "I enjoyed a hot springs" is more appropriate.

Thank you again!
Russell
I'm glad I could help. :)

Your sentence "Since I had sore muscles, I thought that I wouldn't be able to snowboard." is great! And you're correct on the sentence with the hot springs. Since you enjoyed the hot springs itself, you don't need "at." You're doing awesome!
Toru
Thank you for the comment!
I understand well. And I'm glad to hear you say that (^^)

Oetsu (嗚咽 - Sobbing)

Feb 15, 2018 18:11
Last week I got a job interview of a new position, but I also got a notice of rejection yesterday.

I'm about to sob in a choking voice.

Such a state is sometimes called 嗚咽 (oetsu) in Japanese.

嗚 (o) means sorrowing or crying voice, and 咽 (etsu) means to cry or sob while choking.

I think that there is no need to explain the etymology of this word.

Incidentally, we say おえ (oe) when feeling nauseated, so some people think that “oetsu” means to feel nauseat or cry while vomitting.

However, since this thought is wrong, please be careful when you use it.
嗚咽

私は先週新しい仕事の面接を受けましたが、昨日不採用通知がきました。

今にも声を詰まらせて泣き出しそうです。

このような状態のことを、日本語で「嗚咽」ということがあります。

「嗚」は悲しんだり泣いたりする声のことを、「咽」は息が詰まるように(むせるように)泣くことを意味します。

吐き気がするとき「おえ」と言うことから、嗚咽の意味を「吐き気を催すこと」や「吐きそうなほど泣くこと」と考える人がいますが、これは間違っています。
No. 1 tony's correction
tony
"Sob in a choking voice" is not a phrase I have ever heard or used. I think that "sob" by itself may mean what you are saying 嗚咽 means.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
I understand well :)

Kuragae (鞍替え - Changing Sides)

Feb 14, 2018 20:04
Have you ever changed your job?

Generally, changing your job or career is called 転職 (tenshoku) in Japanese.

Here 転 (ten) means "change" and 職 (shoku) means "job."

On the other hand, we sometimes call such changing your job/affiliation/sides 鞍替え (kuragae).

There are several theories about 鞍 (kura) -- some say that it comes from 倉 (kura), meaning "whereabouts," and others say that it comes from 郭 (kuruwa), meaning "licensed brothel."
(Also, "gae/kae" in "kuragae" means "change.")

This term was originally used when prostitutes changed their brothels.

Later, it has come to be used to mean to change your job.
鞍替え

あなたは仕事を変えたことがありますか?

通常、職業や職場などを変えることを日本語で「転職」と言います。

「転」は "change," 「職」は "job" を意味します。

一方、転職することを「鞍替え」と言うこともあります。

「鞍」の語源は諸説ありますが、居場所を意味する「倉(くら)」や、遊郭を意味する「郭(くるわ)」から来ていると考えられています。

「替え」は "change" を意味し、もともとこの言葉は遊女や芸人が事情があって勤め先を変更すること表していました。

現在では単に「転職」の意味でも用いられるようになっています。
No. 1 Zyzzyx's correction
So does 鞍替え have a negative connotation at all, or is it a neutral word now?
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Now 鞍替え is almost a neutral word, but sometimes it’s used as a negative meaning.

Kimo ga Suwaru (肝が据わる)

Feb 13, 2018 18:53
Yesterday, I introduced you to the expression; 心臓に毛が生えている (shinzo ni ke ga haeteiru - hairs are sprouted on one's heart), which means to be stout.

I also talked about the fact that we think of livers as a symbol of courage/mind, and the above expression was 肝に毛が生える (kimo ni ke ga haeru - hairs are sprouted on one's liver).

Actually, even now there are several expressions that regards 肝 (kimo - liver) as 心 (mind/heart) -- one of them is 肝が据わる (kimo ga suwaru).

Here, the verb 据わる (suwar) means that something is stable and doesn't move.

That is to say, "kimo ga suwaru" means a person who have stable mind and is stout.

This expression is used in the similar meaning as "shinzo ni ke ga haeteiru."
肝が据わる

昨日は、度胸があることを意味する「心臓に毛が生えている」という言葉を紹介しました。

そして、かつて日本では「心(精神)」が「肝」にあると考えられており、この言葉は「肝に毛が生える」だったということも紹介しました。

実は今でも、「肝」を「心」と考えてできた慣用句「肝が据わる」が使われています。

「据わる」は「安定して動かない」ことを意味する動詞です。

すなわち「肝が据わる」は、精神が安定していて何事にも動じないような人のことを表します。

「心臓に毛が生えている」と同じように使われる言葉です。
No. 1 Sharu's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

Shinzo ni Ke ga Haeteiru (心臓に毛が生えている - Stout)

Feb 12, 2018 13:39
We sometimes call a person who is stout and brazen 心臓に毛が生えている (shinzo ni ke ga haeteiru).

心臓 (shinzo) means "heart," "毛" means "hair," "生えている" means "sprouting hair," so the literal meaning of this expression is "hairs are sprouted on one's heart."

Originally, this expression was said as 肝に毛が生える (kimo ni ke ga haeru), by using 肝 (kimo - liver) instead of 心臓 (shinzo - heart).

In Japan, "liver" was regarded as a symbol of courage, and it was thought that people who are stout and manful have strong hairy livers.

Later, "kimo" (liver) changed to "shinzo" (heart), influenced by Western thought that our spirits/minds/feelings are in our hearts.
心臓に毛が生えている

図々しい人や、度胸のある人のことを、「心臓に毛が生えている」と言うことがあります。

「心臓」は "heart," 「毛」は "hair," 生えているは "sprouting hair" を意味するので、この言葉の文字通りの意味は "hairs are sprouted on one's heart" となります。

もともとこの言葉は、"liver" を意味する「肝」を使って、「肝に毛が生える」と言われていました。

日本では、「肝(肝臓)」は度胸や勇気の象徴とされており、ここに毛が生えるということは肝が強い、すなわち度胸があると考えられていました。

後に、心(精神)は心臓にあるという西洋の思考に影響され、「肝臓」が「心臓」に置き換わったそうです。
No. 1 Timmy's correction
Interesting! I have heard about hairy palms and such, but hairy liver is definitely something else! ^_^
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post!
Wow, hairy palms sound like shocking.
Timmy
You're welcome!
I was shocked too when I heard about it for the first time.

Kokoro (心 - Heart)

Feb 11, 2018 14:55
One's mind, that would be basis of human feelings, knowledge, or intention, is called 心 (kokoro) in Japanese.

There is a theory that this word comes from the fact that we called organs of poultry animals 凝る (koru) or 凝こる (kokoru).

Here, the verb "koru" means that something concentrates on one point.

Originally, "kokoro" meant organs, but it came to mean a human's organ (especially heart), and later, it has come to mean a mind.

Also, there is another theory that "kokoro" comes from an onomatopoeia: コロコロ (koro koro), which expresses that something is rotating/changing.

In this theory, it's implied that human mind or thought is easy to change.

Incidentally, if you want to mean a heart of organs, you should say 心臓 (shinzō) by adding 臓 (zō - organ) to 心 (shin - heart).


人間の理性・知識・感情・意思などの精神的な働きのもとになるものを、日本語で「心」と言います。

この言葉は、禽獣などの臓腑を見て「凝る」または「凝こる」と言ったのを語源とする説があります。

「凝る」は、一点に集中することなどを意味する動詞です。

もともとは臓腑を表していたのが、人間の内臓(特に心臓)の通称となり、さらには精神の意味に進んだとのことです。

また、何かが転がることを表す擬態語「コロコロ」から転じたという説もあります。

この説では、人の気持ちや思いは変わりやすいことを示唆しています。

ちなみに、臓器の心臓を意味したい場合は、臓物を意味する「臓」を付けて「心臓」と言います。
No. 1 Bull's correction
Your posts (from what I read a long time ago) were always very good and very easy to understand. There are rarely any mistakes too!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that (^^)

人 (Hito - Person)

Feb 10, 2018 20:24
Today I'd like to talk about the Kanji: 人 (hito), which means "person" or "human."

In the famous Japanese drama, "Kinpachi-sensei," this kanji was introduced something like the following:

"This kanji, 人, represents that a person supports another person. That is to say, people are support each other."

I think that many Japanese people remember this etymology about 人.

However, this theory is wrong -- actually this kanji represents one person who is standing sideways.

It's difficult to explain with only words, but the line extending to the upper side, the lower left, and the lower right represent a head, arms, a lower body, respectively.


今日は「人」という漢字について語ります。

「人」は "person" もしくは "human" を意味します。

日本で有名なドラマ「金八先生」で、この漢字の成り立ちは次のように紹介されました。

「「人」という字は、ひとりの「人」がもうひとりの「人」を支えている。つまり、人と人が支え合っているから「人」である。」

この言葉を覚えている日本人は、とても多いと思います。

しかし、実際のところこの漢字は、一人の人が横を向いて立っていることを表しているようです。

言葉で説明するのは難しいですが、上に伸びている線が顔で、左下に伸びている線が腕で、右下に伸びている線が下半身を表しています。
No. 1 Zyzzyx's correction
To me, this kanji looks like a person standing with feet far apart, but with the arms not represented. Is that what you mean?
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!

Actually, the original form of 人 is something like the following:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%E4%BA%BA-oracle.svg
Since the person is looked from the side, arms (feet) are represented by one line.
Zyzzyx
Ah, I see it now - interesting!

Kutabireru (くたびれる - Tired)

Feb 9, 2018 09:27
Yesterday, くたびれました (kutabire mashita – I was tired).

The verb くたびれる (kutabireru) means to lose your physical energy and tired/exhausted.

When expressing such a state, the verb 疲れる (tsukaresu) is commonly used.

I think that I also usually choose "tsukaresu" when I'm tired.

In my opinion, "kutabireru" is often used when you get mentally tired in addition to physical fatigue.

Incidentally, the subject of "tsukareru" is always people, whereas the subject of "kutabireru" can be things instead of people.

In this case, "kutabireru" means that something becomes shabby or beat-up.
くたびれる

昨日はくたびれました。

動詞「くたびれる」は、体力を消耗して元気がなくなることを表します。

一般的に、そのような状態を表す際には「疲れる」が用いられます。

私も大抵、「疲れる」を選択すると思います。

私の考えでは、「くだびれる」は肉体的な疲れに加えて、精神的にも疲れている際に使われる傾向があります。

また、「疲れる」は人を主語にとりますが、「くたびれる」は物も主語にとることができます。

その場合、使い古されてみすぼらしくなる、というような意味になります。
No. 1 Jacob's correction
I didn't know that. Thank you for teaching me a new word. Great job explaining it, too!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Isse Ichidai (一世一代 - Something of One's Life)

Feb 8, 2018 18:40
Today may be a very important day called 一世一代 (isse ichidai) for me.

The four-character idiom, "isse ichidai," means an important thing of your lifetime or an important event that it might never happen.

Here, both 一世 (isse) and 一代 (ichidai) are words that mean a human life.

Originally, this idiom was used for meaning that a kabuki (traditional Japanese drama performed by male actors) actor played a performance that he could do best in his last stage.

Such a performance in the last stage is of course a very important event that could never happen again in the future.
一世一代

今日は私にとって、「一世一代」の重要な日かもしれません。

「一世一代」とは、一生に一度だけであることや、二度とないほど重要な出来事であることを表す四字熟語です。

「一世」と「一代」はどちらも、人の一生を意味する言葉です。

もともとこの言葉は、歌舞伎役者が引退するときに、最後の舞台で最も得意な芸を演じることを指していたようです。

引退するときの最後の舞台は、まさに一生に一度しか訪れない重要なことです。
No. 1 Fifi's correction
I made it a little more natural today. Very interesting post. I hope your day goes well.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and kind comment!
I was so excited :)
No. 2 Finn's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)

"Doki Doki" (ドキドキ), "Waku Waku" (ワクワク), "Hara Hara" (ハラハラ)

Feb 7, 2018 16:02
I introduced you to two words related to "excitement" in the last two days.

Today I'd like to talk about three kind of onomatopoeia related to "excitement."

These are ドキドキ (doki doki), ワクワク (waku waku), and ハラハラ (hara hara).

"Doki doki" represents a beat of one's heart, and it's used for meaning various types of excitement -- anxiety, expectation, and fear.

"Waku waku" comes from the verb 湧く (waku), which means to well up, and it's usually used for meaning an excitement of joy or expectation.

"Hara hara" means an excitement due to a feeling of anxiety, and it's used when you worry about something.

ヒヤ (hiya hiya) is used instead of "hara hara."
「ドキドキ」と「ワクワク」と「ハラハラ」

ここ二日間で、私は「興奮」に関連する言葉を二つ紹介しました。

今日は、「興奮」を表す擬態語を三つ紹介します。

それは「ドキドキ」と「ワクワク」、そして「ハラハラ」です。

「ドキドキ」は心臓の鼓動を表した言葉で、不安や期待、恐怖など、さまざまな種類の興奮に用いられます。

「ワクワク」は感情が「湧く」から生まれた言葉で、主に期待や喜びによる興奮を表します。

「ハラハラ」は不安な気持ちを表す言葉で、何かの成り行きを心配する際に用いられます。

ちなみに、自分自身にも被害の可能性がある場合は、「ハラハラ」の代わりに「ヒヤヒヤ」が用いられます。
No. 1 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you very much for the corrections! :)
Chris
No problem! I always enjoy reading your posts :)

Kokoro Odoru (心躍る - Exciting)

Feb 6, 2018 19:07
Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term 胸騒ぎ (munasawagi), which means to have a bad feeling.

Today I'd like to talk about another Japanese term: 心躍る (kokoro odoru), which means to be excited with expecting good things.

心 (kokoro) means "heart" and 躍る (odoru) means "to leap up," so the literal meaning of this term si "one's heart leaps up."

This is comes from the fact that your heart skip a beat as if it would leap up when you're excited.

Remember that "munasawagi" is usually used for a bad feeling, but it can also used when expecting good things.

On the other hand, "kokoro odoru" is only used as a good meaning.
心躍る

昨日は、悪い予感がして興奮することを意味する「胸騒ぎ」という言葉を紹介しました。

今日は、良い予感がしたり楽しみで興奮することを意味する「心躍る」という言葉を紹介します。

「心」は "heart," 「躍る」は "" を意味するので、「心躍る」の文字通りの意味は "" となります。

興奮するとまるで躍るように心臓が高鳴ることが、この言葉の語源です。

「胸騒ぎ」は基本的には悪い予感で使われますが、良い予感にも使うことができます。

一方で「心躍る」は良い予感にしか使われません。
No. 1 toc's correction
Very interesting! I will try to remember and use these two phrases. Thank you!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)
No. 2 Yun 's correction
"Kokoro odoru"

千と千尋の神隠し(Spirited away)


呼んでいる
胸のどこか奥で
いつも心躍る
夢を見たい

Munasawagi (胸騒ぎ - Bad Feeling)

Feb 5, 2018 20:54
Have you ever felt that something bad would happen?

Such a state is called 胸騒ぎ (munasawagi) in Japanese.

胸 (mune) means "chest" and 騒ぎ (sawagi) means "romp," so the literal meaning of 胸騒ぎ is "one's chest romps."

The etymology is very simple -- if you have a bad feeling about something, you will feel tension and your heart beat faster as if the chest would romp.

These days, you can also say 胸騒ぎ when you're expecting good things and being excited.

Incidentally, this term is usually used like 胸騒ぎがする (munasawagi ga suru - I feel 'munasawagi'),.
胸騒ぎ

何か悪いことが起きると予感して興奮したことはありますか?

そのような状態のことを、日本語で「胸騒ぎ」と表現することがあります。

「胸」は "chest", 「騒ぎ」は "romp" を意味するので、「胸騒ぎ」の文字通りの意味は "one's chest romps" となります。

語源は単純で、嫌な予感で興奮しているときは、まるで胸が騒いでいるかのようのドキドキするからです。

最近では、期待で胸が高鳴ることも、「胸騒ぎ」と表現することがあります。

ちなみに、大抵の場合「胸騒ぎがする」の形で使われます。
No. 1 Jacob's correction
Is this similar to "doki doki suru"? Munasawagi, huh? I think I understand. Thank you very much, I've learned something new today!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!

> Is this similar to "doki doki suru"?
Yes, both have the similar meaning :)
I think that "doki doki suru" implies a good sense, whereas "munasawagi" implies a bad sense.
No. 2 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the suggestion!
Hmm, as you said, maybe it's a little too strong. I think that "munasawagi" can be translated as "vague foreboding," "funny feeling," or "presentiment."

Sarusuberi (サルスベリ - Lagerstroemia Indica)

Feb 4, 2018 13:25
Yesterday, I introduced you to a term related to 猿 (saru - monkey).

Today I'd like to talk about a kind of tree: サルスベリ (sarusuberi), the name of which contains サル (saru - monkey).

"Sarusuberi" is a member of the family Lythraceae, and is called "Lagerstroemia indica" or "crape myrtle" in English.

Here, スベリ (suberi) of "sarusuberi" means "to slip."

Since the bark of "sarusuberi" is very smooth and even a monkey slips and falls from the tree, it has become such a name.

Incidentally, this tree has another name: クスグリノキ (kusuguri no ki - tickling tree).

This is because it swings as if it's tickled when stroking the trunk of the tree.
サルスベリ

昨日は「猿」に関する言葉を紹介しました。

今日は、「猿」の名前が使われている植物を紹介します。

それは「サルスベリ」です。

「サルスベリ」はミソハギ科の落葉中高木で、英語では "Lagerstroemia indica" もしくは "crape myrtle" と呼ばれます。

「サル」は "monkey," 「スベリ」は "to slip" を意味します。

「サルスベリ」は樹皮がとても滑らかで、木登りが得意な猿でさえも滑って落ちることから、このような名前が付けられました。

この植物には、「クスグリノキ」という別名もあります。

木の幹の部分を撫でると、くすぐられたかのように動くためです。
No. 1 SecretSauce's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)
No. 2 Jeangrey27's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for checking my post! :)

Sarushibai (猿芝居 - Stupid Trick)

Feb 3, 2018 05:26
Formerly, I introduced you to the Japanese term 猿真似 (sarumane), which means to imitate acts of others without thinking.
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/63865845310158804822564330234895781584

Today I would like to talk about another Japanese term, 猿芝居 (sarushibai), which also contains the word 猿 (saru) as well as "sarumane" does.

Since 猿 (saru) means "monkey" and 芝居 (shibai) means "show" or "play," "sarushibai" originally meant a "monkey show" literally.

Later, it has come to mean a "poor show/performance," a "sucky play," and an "inept trick."

Incidentally, "sarushibai" is a little similar to the Japanese term 茶番 (chaban), which was introduced in the following my entry.
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/203983428487821700505159013443589740611
猿芝居

以前私は、「考えもなくむやみに人のまねをすること」を意味する「猿真似」という言葉を紹介しました。

今日は、同じく「猿」を使った言葉「猿芝居」を紹介します。

猿は "monkey," 芝居は "show" を意味するので、もともと猿芝居は文字通り "monkey show" を意味する言葉でした。

これが後に、下手な演技をあざける言葉として使われるようになり、更に、見え透いた浅はかなたくらみを意味するようにもなりました。

この言葉は、以下のリンクで紹介している「茶番」と意味が少し似ています。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
ahahaha, it's like the English equivalent of "Monkey see, monkey do." I have a request for a future entry: can you explain the origin of 一か八か?
Toru
Thank you for letting me know the expression! It's pleasing to the ear.

> I have a request for a future entry: can you explain the origin of 一か八か?
Thank you for the suggestion. Actually, I already talked about 一か八か in the following entry :)
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/113625984541929466656458525521577151436
No. 2 Timmy's correction
Interesting! Frankly I would like to see a play where all roles are performed by monkeys)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
If such a show exists, I also want to see it sometime :)

ちなみに少し前、以下のTwitterの猿芝居動画が話題になりました。
https://twitter.com/kyonodoga/status/864457591794974720/video/1
Timmy
You're welcome!

>ちなみに少し前、以下のTwitterの猿芝居動画が話題になりました。

Look at that poor sod, he didn't expect it to end like this)) Thank you for sharing the video!

Heppiri Goshi (へっぴり腰 - Full of Fear)

Feb 2, 2018 16:07
Have you ever seen a person who has a extremely diffident attitude or is full of fear?

Such a person is called へっぴり腰 (heppiri goshi) in Japanese.

へっぴり (heppiri) comes from へひり (hehiri) or 屁をひる (he wo hiru), which means "to fart," and 腰 (koshi) means "hip."

Therefore, the literal meaning of "heppiri goshi" is "one's hip (posture) when farting."

In fact, this term originally meant such a half-crouching posture that is unstable.

Later, since people have such a posture when they have less confidence, "heppiri goshi" has come to also mean a diffident attitude.
へっぴり腰

自信のない態度をとっている人を見たことがありますか?

そのような人のことを、日本語で「へっぴり腰」と言います。

「へっぴり」はおならをすることを意味する「屁をひる」および「へひり」から来ており、「腰」は "hip" を意味します。

すなわち、「へっぴり腰」の文字通りの意味は、「おならをする時のような姿勢(尻)」となります。

実際、この言葉はもともと、そのような中腰の不安定な姿勢を意味していました。

後に、人は自信が無い時にもそのような姿勢をとることから、自信のない態度を意味するようにもなりました。
No. 1 Marek's correction
Toru
  • Have you ever seen a person who has an extremely different attitude or is full of fear?
Thank you so much for the corrections!

I wanted to use the term "diffident," but is this unnatural?
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/diffident
Marek
I apologize, I've never heard of the word "diffident", so I wrongly assumed you meant "different". So "diffident" is correct and actually makes a bit more sense. My bad, sorry ^__^

Iki wo Korosu (息を殺す - Holding/Bating One's Breath)

Feb 1, 2018 01:20
If you don't want anyone to find you, you will keep your body still and depress breathing.

Such an act is called 息を殺す (iki wo korosu) in Japanese.

息 (iki) means "breath" and 殺す (korosu) means "to kill," so the literal meaning of this "iki wo korosu" is "to kill one's breath."

It is thought that this idiom comes from the fact that if you kill (stop) your breath, it will be very quiet.

Also, some thought that the etymology is that "iki" means "life" or "soul," and if you kill it, it will be very quiet.
息を殺す

誰かに見つかりたくないときは、呼吸を抑えて動かずにじっとしていると思います。

このようなことを、日本語で「息を殺す」と表現します。

「息」は "breath," 「殺す」は "to kill" を意味するので、「息を殺す」の文字通りの意味は "to kill one's breath" となります。

息をまるで殺したかのように、静かにすることが語源だと考えられます。

また、「息」は命や魂を意味し、「死んだように静かにする」ことが語源だとする説もあります。
No. 1 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Jigyaku-fū Jiman (自虐風自慢 - Humblebrag)

Jan 31, 2018 04:12
There is a Japanese slang term: 自虐風自慢 (jigyaku-fū jiman), which was born from the Internet.

自虐 (jigyaku) means "self-condemnation," 風 (fū) means "sounds like," and 自慢 (jiman) means "brag."

Therefore, "jigyaku-fū jiman" means one's brag that sounds like self-condemnation.

For example, it's something like the following utterances.

"Oh, I received ONLY $10,000 as a bonus in summer, it's terrible."

"These days various men try to ask me out almost every day, sigh.., I'm tired of refusing them."

Since "jigyaku-fū jiman" makes people uncomfortable, please be careful not to say it.
自虐風自慢

インターネットから生まれたスラングに「自虐風自慢」というものがあります。

「自虐」は "self-condemnation," 「風」は "sounds like," 「自慢」は "brag" を意味します。

このため、「自虐風自慢」は "one's brag that sounds like self-condemnation" を意味します。

例えば、次のような発言のことを指します。

「今年の夏のボーナス、たったの100万円しか貰えなかったよ」

「最近毎日のように色んな人からデートに誘われるんだけど、断るのが大変」

自虐風自慢は多くの人が不快に思うので、控えましょう。
No. 1 fortRedBorder's correction
Thanks for the interesting text. 自虐風自慢 certainly is an annoying characteristic. :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
Yes. Unfortunately you can find many 自虐風自慢 in Twitter in Japan.
No. 2 Kiwi's correction
Finally Japanese is catching up to American neologisms
Toru
Yes, indeed :)

Arikitari (ありきたり - Predictable)

Jan 30, 2018 09:06
If you are called ありきたり (arikitari), you will feel a little sad.

"Arikitari" means that something or someone is ordinary, commonplace, and you can find it everywhere.

This word was born by conjugating a verb: ありきたる (arikitaru).

あり (ari) of "arikitari" means "to exist" and きたり (kitari) means "to continue to the present", so this verb mean that something has existed as always.

Because of this, "arikitari" derived from "arikitaru" has come to means something ordinary, commonplace or predictable.

However, note that these days the verb "arikitaru" is rarely used.
ありきたり

「ありきたり」と言われたら、少し悲しい気持ちになると思います。

「ありきたり」は、珍しくなく、どこでも見かけるような、ありふれたさまを表す言葉です。

この言葉は、動詞「ありきたる」が変化したものです。

「あり」は存在する、「きたる」は現在にまで及ぶことを意味するため、この動詞は「もとから存在し続けてる」や「今までどおりである」ことを意味します。

このことから、「ありきたり」は「ありふれていること」を意味するようになりました。

動詞「ありきたる」は現在ではほとんど使われないことに注意して下さい。
No. 1 朋也's correction
Toru
Thank you for reading my post!

Kubi wo Nagaku-suru (首を長くする - Waiting Eagerly)

Jan 29, 2018 13:07
There is a Japanese idiom: 首を長くする (kubi wo nagaku-suru).

首 (kubi) means "neck" and 長くする (nagaku-suru) means "to lengthen something," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "to lengthen one's neck."

However, it actually means to wait for something eagerly.

If you are looking forward to meet someone, you will stretch yourself or lengthen your neck in order to look into the far distance.

Because of this, "kubi wo nagaku-suru" has come to be used in the above meaning.

If you want to express you're waiting for something explicitly, you can say 首を長くして待つ (kubi wo nagaku-shite matsu), by using the verb 待つ (matsu - waiting).
首を長くする

日本語には「首を長くする」という慣用句があります。

「首」は "neck," 「長くする」は "to lengthen something" を意味するので、「首を長くする」の文字通りの意味は "to lengthen one's neck" となります。

しかし、実際には「何かを期待して待ち焦がれる」ことを意味します。

誰かと会うとき、それが楽しみであれば、遠くを見ようとしてきっと首を伸ばしたり背伸びしたりするはずです。

このことから、「首を長くする」は上記の意味で使われるようになりました。

ちなみに、「首を長くして待つ」のようにして、「待つ」ことを明示的に表すこともできます。
No. 1 Jallyy's correction
面白い!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Kubi wo Hineru (首をひねる - Twisting One's Neck)

Jan 28, 2018 02:35
I 首をひねりました (kubi wo hineri mashita).

This Japanese expression, "kubi wo hineru" has two different meanings.

(首 (kubi) means "neck" and ひねる (hineru) means "to twist.")

The one meaning is literally, to twist and strain one's neck physically.

Unfortunately, I physically twisted my neck.

The other meaning is a kind of behavior when you doubt something, or you're dissatisfied with something.

In English, you can express it as "angle/lean/tilt one's head" by using "head" instead of "neck."

If you want to explicitly express the meaning of doubt or dissatisfaction, you should say 首を傾げる (kubi wo kasigeru - tilting one's neck).
首をひねる

私は首をひねりました。

「首をひねる」には、大きく二つの意味があります。

(「首」は "neck," 「ひねる」は "to twist" を意味します。)

一つ目の意味は、文字どおり、物理的に首をひねって痛めるということです。

残念ながら、私は物理的に首をひねりました。

もう一つの意味は、何かを疑ったり、何かに不満があるときの素振りです。

英語では、"angle/lean/tilt one's head" (頭を傾ける) のように表現します。

もし疑念や不満の意味であることを明示的に表したい場合は、「首を傾げる」と言うと良いと思います。
No. 1 jol's correction
Very interesting and very well written!
Toru
Thank you very much for the corrections! (^^)

Itsutsu no Fukuro (五つの袋 - Five Bags)

Jan 27, 2018 04:21
Yesterday, I introduced you to 三つの袋 (mittsu no fukuro - three bags), which is often told in Japanese weddings.

I said that there are three important bags in married life, but these days 五つの袋 (itsutsu no fukuro - five bags) are sometimes mentioned.

Today I'd like to talk about the additional two bags.

The fourth one is 胃袋 (ibukuro), which means "stomach."

Delicious meals are indispensable for a happy married life.

The fifth one is 金玉袋 (kintama bukuro), which means "scrotum."

It is also important to have sex life and have children.
五つの袋

昨日は、結婚式でよく使われる「三つの袋」について話しました。

結婚生活で大切な「三つの袋」ということでしたが、最近では二つ追加されて「五つの袋」と言うこともあります。

今日は残りの二つの袋を紹介します。

四つ目は「胃袋」です。

美味しいご飯は、幸せな結婚生活には欠かせません。

五つ目は「金玉袋」です。

性生活や、子孫を残すことも大事というわけです。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
I see
No. 2 fortRedBorder's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)
> Or perhaps euphemistically "the family jewels". :)
I learned a nice expression!

Mittsu no Fukuro (三つの袋 - Three Bags)

Jan 26, 2018 09:39
There is a classic story called 三つの袋 (mittsu no fukuro), which is used in a Japanese wedding.

The literal meaning of "mittsu no fukuro" is "three bags," and these bags are often mentioned as important things in married life or keys to matrimonial harmony.

The first one is 給料袋 (kyuryo bukuro), which means "pay envelope."

Economic stability is of course important.

The second one is 堪忍袋 (kannin bukuro), which means a limit of patience.

Sometimes you should endure something for your happy married life.

The third one is お袋 (ofukuro), which means "mother" or "mother-in-law."

This implies that you must not to forget that your parents raised you, and have to take good care of your parents.
三つの袋

日本の結婚式のスピーチでは、「三つの袋」という定番ネタがあります。

この「三つの袋」は、結婚生活で大切なものや、夫婦円満の秘訣としてよく紹介されます。

一つ目は、給料袋です。

経済的に安定することは、当然ですが重要です。

二つ目は、堪忍袋です。

堪忍袋は我慢できる限界を表した言葉です。

結婚生活を送る上で、時には我慢も大事だということです。

三つ目は、お袋です。

お袋とは母親(もしくは姑)のことで、育ててもらった恩を忘れず、大切にしていきなさいということです。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
I never understood why one's mother is called お袋。Is it because kangaroos raise their joeys in their pouches?
Toru
Thank you for the comment, Kiwi-san.
I think that most Japanese people don't know the etymology. I talked about お袋 in the following entry. If you have time, please check it :)
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/72569617963816665032649022677124416558
Kiwi
Thanks, but I don’t really believe it. Children carried in bags? No way
Toru
Sorry for my confusing English.

There are several theories about the reason why one's mother is called お袋.
The first one is that mothers managed the property (money) with bags.
The second one is that we grow up in our mother's bosom (here the bosom implies psychological one). Bosom is called 懐 (futokoro), and it changed to fukuro, and ofukuro.
Also, there is another theory -- it comes from the fact that we called uterus ふくろ (fukuro).
No. 2 John's correction
Good job. Keep going.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
No. 3 alexthegreat's correction
These ideas towards marriage seem a bit old fashioned, but the post was very interesting. I really like the term 堪忍袋. I don't think we have anything similar in English. We have some expressions for when you lose your patience like "the last straw".
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the interesting expression!
I learned something new (^^)

Kusawake (草分け - Pioneer)

Jan 25, 2018 16:17
A person who did something for the first time is called 創始者 (soushisha).

創 (sou) means "creation," 始 (shi) means "first," and 者 (sha) means "person," so I don't think that it's necessary to explain the etymology of this term.

On the other hand, there is another term, 草分け (kusawake), which has the similar meaning of "soushisya."

草 (kusa) means "grass" and 分け (wake) means "to mow," so the literal meaning of 草分け (kusawake) is "to mow grass."

nOriginally, this term meant to develop a foundation of a village or town by opening a grassy land.

Deriving from it, this term has come to mean development of a new field, or a pioneer.
草分け

何かを初めてする人のことを「創始者」と言います。

「創」は "creation," 「始」は "first," 「者」は "person" を意味するので、この言葉の成り立ちについては説明するまでもありません。

一方、「創始者」と同じ意味を持つ言葉に「草分け」があります。

「草」は "grass," 「分け」は "to mow" を意味するので、「草分け」の文字どおりの意味は "to mow grass" となります。

もともとこの言葉は、草深い未開の土地を切り開き、村や町を興すことを意味していました。

これが派生し、未開の分野を切り開くことや、創始者を意味するようにもなったというわけです。
No. 1 chrisjruddy's correction
Interesting! 草分けは聞いたことないです!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)
chrisjruddy
Of course!

Nechigae (寝違え - Sprained Neck)

Jan 24, 2018 22:56
Yesterday, maybe I got a bad symptom called 寝違え (nechigae).

"Nechigae" refers to a symptom accompanied with pain (especially around the neck) like muscle ache, which is caused by unnatural posture while sleeping.

Here, 寝 (ne) means "sleep," and 違え (chigae) means "difference" or "disagreement."

Therefore, it is thought that this term implies that the sleeping is different from the correct way.

If you want to this term as a verb, you can say 寝違える (nechigaeru).

Since the pain of "nechigae" this time is really strong, I will go to a hospital if it continues until tomorrow.
寝違え

私は昨日、寝違えたかもしれません。

「寝違え」とは、睡眠中に無理な姿勢をとることで、首などの筋肉に負担をかけ、筋肉痛のような痛みが生じる症状のことです。

「寝」は "sleep," 「違え」は "difference" や "disagreement" を意味します。

このため、「寝方を間違える」が「寝違え」の語源だと考えられます。

動詞で使う場合は、「寝違える」と言います。

今回の寝違えは痛みがかなり強いので、明日になっても治まらなかったら病院に行こうと思います。
No. 1 wnowicki's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 outdoors's correction
uh oh. Hope you feel better.
Toru
Thank you for your kind comment!
I've been somewhat recovered :)

Okotoba ni Amaete (お言葉に甘えて - If You Insist)

Jan 23, 2018 10:56
Today I'd like to talk about the convenient Japanese expression, お言葉に甘えて (okotoba ni amaete), which can be used in various situations.

"Okotoba ni amaete" is used when you want to accept someone's kind offer willingly.

お (o) in お言葉 (okotoba) is a polite prefix, and 言葉 (kotoba) means "words."

Also, 甘えて (amaete) means "to depend on somsething."

Therefore, the literal meaning of "okotoba ni amaete" is "I depend on your words."

Here, "your words" implies "your kind offer," so this expression actually means "I'll take you on that" or "If you insist."
お言葉に甘えて

今日は、日常会話でもビジネスシーンでも使える便利な表現、「お言葉に甘えて」を紹介します。

「お言葉に甘えて」は、相手の好意からの申し出を進んで受け入れるときに使われる言葉です。

「お言葉」の「お」は丁寧の接頭辞で、「言葉」は "words" を意味します。

そして「甘えて」は "to depend on something" を意味します。

したがって「お言葉に甘えて」の文字どおりの意味は、"I depend on your words" となります。

ここで、お言葉 (your words) は好意 (your kind offer) を示唆しており、冒頭で紹介したような意味になるというわけです。

英語では "I'll take you up on that" や "If you insist" などと訳されます。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
good job
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for your corrections! :)

Osoreirimasu (恐れ入ります - Thanks/Sorry)

Jan 22, 2018 20:45
Yesterday and the day before yesterday, I introduced you to Japanese expressions that mean the feeling of apology or appreciation.

In addition, I'd like to talk about another term that has the similar meaning, 恐れ入ります (osoreirimasu).

"Osoreirimasu" is the polite form of 恐れ入る (osoreiru).

The literal meaning of "osoreiru" is "I’m scared of you," but it can also mean "I can't stand against you" or "I'm awed by you."

Later, it has come to contain the current meanings.

"Osoreirimasu" is more polite than "sumimasen," and is often used when you want to say sorry/thanks with awe.
恐れ入ります

昨日と一昨日は、「感謝」と「謝罪」の気持ちを表す言葉を紹介しました。

今日は更にもう一つ、「恐れ入ります」を紹介します。

「恐れ入る」の文字どおりの意味は「あなたのことを恐れている」ですが、「あなたには敵いません」や「畏まってしまう」ということも意味します。

そして、「感謝」や「謝罪」の気持ちが含まれるようになったというわけです。

「すみません」よりも、相手に対する畏怖・畏敬の念を表したいときによく使われます。
No. 1 mpjnerd's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Katajikenai (かたじけない - Thanks)

Jan 21, 2018 16:18
Yesterday, I introduced you to the expression すみません (sumimasen), which is used when expressing the feeling of apology or appreciation.

There is another expression, かたじけない (katajikenai), which can express your feeling as similar to "sumimasen" or ありがとう (arigatou - Thank you).

"Katajikenai" originally meant something like "humbled" or "afraid," but now it also means the feeling of appreciation.

There are several theories about its etymology, but the truth hasn't cleared yet.

"Katajikenai" was used as a word of thanks in various situations before "arigatou" became popular, but these days it's rarely used in everyday conversation.

(You can find this expression in Japanese period films/dramas.)
かたじけない

昨日は、謝罪や感謝の気持ちを表すときによく使う「すみません」という言葉を紹介しました。

「すみません」や「ありがとう」と同じような気持ちを表現する言葉に、「かたじけない」というものがあります。

「かたじけない」はもともと「恐れ多い」という意味でしたが、転じて感謝の気持ちを表すようにもなりました。

語源については諸説あり、はっきりとしたことはわかっていません。

この言葉は「ありがとう」が一般化する前に、お礼の言葉として広く用いられていましたが、現在の日常会話ではほとんど使われなくなりました。
(時代劇などでよく見かけます。)
No. 1 Lamia's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Sumimasen (すみません - Sorry/Thanks)

Jan 20, 2018 14:48
Japanese people often say すみません (sumimasen) when they want to express their feelings of apology or appreciation.

"Sumimasen" is a polite form of すまぬ (sumanu), and "sumanu" is composed of the verb 済む (sumu) and the negative word ぬ (nu).

Here, "sumu" originally means "to be finished" or "to be solved," and it can also mean "to feel cheerful" or "to feel comfortable."

That is to say, "sumimasen," the negative form of "sumu," means that "you don't feel cheerful."

If you bring trouble to someone, or are helped by someone while taking much time, your feeling won't be cheerful/comfortable.

Because of this, "sumimasen" has come to be used to express the feeling of apology or appreciation.
すみません

日本では、謝罪や感謝の気持ちを表す時、よく「すみません」と言います。

「すみません」は「すまぬ」の丁寧な形で、「すまぬ」は動詞「済む」に打ち消しの「ぬ」がついた言葉です。

ここで「済む」は、「仕事が終わる」「物事が解決する」のような意味で、「気持ちがはれる」「気持ちが安らぐ」などを意味することもあります。

すなわち、「済む」の否定である「すみません」は、「気持ちがはれない」ことを意味します。

誰かに迷惑をかけたり、手間を大いにかけて助けてもらったら、あなたの気持ちははれず、満足もできないと思います。

このことから、「すみません」は謝罪や感謝の気持ちを表す際に利用されるようになりました。
No. 1 SecretSauce's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Does the SPEAKER not feel cheerful, or the listener?
What I wanted to say is that the speaker doesn't feel cheerful :)
No. 2 Yun 's correction
Toru san, how about :

かたじけない
恐れ入ります
お言葉に甘えて
Toru
Thank you for the comment, Yun-san!
Please let me write about these expressions in my posts.
Yun
\\^__^// well, thank you.. very nice
Yun
\\^__^// well, thank you.. very nice
No. 3 Sharon's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 4 クライド's correction
Your English is amazing, Toru! Great job! :D
Toru
Thank you for the correction and your comment, クライド-san! (^^)

Hashigo (はしご - Ladder)

Jan 19, 2018 18:24
はしご (hashigo) is a kind of tool that is used to go up to high places, and is referred to as "ladder" in English.

In Japan, we sometimes say はしごする (hashigo suru), the literal meaning of which is "I do ladder," but do you know the actual meaning?

Here "hashigo" is short for はしご酒 (hashigo zake - ladder alcohol), which means to go on a pub crawl.

This term comes from the fact that we called going familiar bars one by one just like climbing up a ladder step by step "hashigo zake."

These days, "hashigo" can mean to visit the same kind of shops or facilities continuously.
はしご

「はしご」は高い所に上るための道具で、英語では "ladder" と表現されます。

日本では「はしごする」のような表現を使うことがありますが、どのような意味か想像できますか?

ここでの「はしご」は「はしご酒」の略で、次々と店を変えて飲み歩くことを意味します。

これは、はしごを一段ずつ登っていくように、なじみの店を一軒ずつ訪ね歩いて飲むことと「はしご酒」と呼んだことに由来します。

現在では飲み屋だけでなく、同じ類の店や施設を渡り歩くことも「はしご」や「はしごする」と言います。
No. 1 SecretSauce's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Mimicchii (みみっちい - Stingy)

Jan 18, 2018 15:44
Have you ever stuck to a small amount of money of or a small thing?

Such a person is referred to as みみっちい (mimicchii) in Japanesr.

みみ (mimi) is short for ミミズ (mimizu), which means "earthworm," and っちい (cchii) means that it looks like something.

That is to say, this term implies that someone has thin and small personality like a earthworm.

I don't care about a small amount of money, but I often stick to a small thing, so I might be called みみっちい人間 (mimicchii hito - stingy person).
みみっちい

僅かなお金や小さなことにこだわったことはありますか?

そのような人のことを、日本語で「みみっちい」と形容することがあります。

「みみ」は昆虫の「ミミズ」を省略したもので、「っちい」は「〜のようだ」ということを意味します。

すなわちこの言葉は、「ミミズのように細く小さい人間だ」ということを言っているわけです。

私はお金にはあまりこだわりがありませんが、小さなことに対してこだわりが強いので、結局「みみっちい人」かもしれません。
No. 1 PeterJ's correction
みみっちい in dictionary also says small-minded, might want to expound on that topic more because "small things" does not really mean small-minded.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and your fortune note!
I think that "small-minded" represents みみっちい very well.

> っちい is like らしい?
Yes, or like のような. There is another expression ぼろっちい that uses っちい, but I think that っちい is used only slang terms.

Monuke no Kara (もぬけの殻 - Completely Empty)

Jan 17, 2018 11:01
If there are completely no people in a building, the situation is called もぬけの殻 (monuke no kara) in Japanese.

もぬけ "monuke" comes from the Japanese verb: もぬける (monukeru), which means that cicadas or snakes cast their shells/skins.

殻 (kara) means "shell" or "slough," so "monuke no kara" originally meant "cicada shell" or "snake's slough."

Later, this has come to be used for buildings where no one is present or containers with nothing.

Also, it is thought that も (mo) of "monukeru" comes from 身 (mi - body) or 裳 (mo - kimono/clothes), so "monukeru" implies that "one's body leave" or "one leave by clothes."
(Note that 抜ける(nukeru) of "monukeru" means to leave by somewhere.)
もぬけの殻

建物などに人が全く居ない状態のことを、「もぬけの殻」と言います。

「もぬけ」は、蛇や蝉が脱皮することを意味する「もぬける」という動詞から来ています。

「殻」は、"shell" を意味するので、「もぬけの殻」はもともと蛇や蝉の抜け殻を意味する言葉でした。

これが、人間がいなくなった建物や、物が無くなった箱などにも使われるようになったというわけです。

また、「もぬける」の「も」は、「身」や「裳(着物)」だと考えられており、「身が抜ける」や「着物から抜け出す」ことがこの言葉の語源だとされています。
No. 1 Broch (ブラック)'s correction
I did not know the word "slough" in English, so thanks for teaching me something about my own language! もぬけの殻 is also an interesting phrase.

Excellent work on these sentences! You were attempting some difficult grammar rules. A lot of English writers don't know how to properly put a parenthetical sentence at the end like that either.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and helpful comments!
I learned something new! And I'm so glad to hear you say that (^^)

Kugi wo Sasu (釘を刺す Warning against Someone)

Jan 16, 2018 13:24
To give someone a warning in advance in order not to cause a problem later is referred to as 釘を刺す (kugi wo sasu) in Japanese.

釘 (kugi) means "nail" and 刺す (sasu) means "to drive," so the literal meaning of "kugi wo sasu" is "to drive a nail (into someone)."

This expression comes from the construction method in Japan.

In the past, Japanese people built buildings only by assembling timbers, but later we have come to drive nails to fix them for the sake of safety.

Because of this, "kugi wo sasu" has come to mean to warn against someone for safety purposes.
釘を刺す

人に対して、あとで問題が起きないように念を押すことを、「釘を刺す」と言います。

「釘」は "nail," 「刺す」は "to drive" を意味するので、「釘を刺す」の文字どおりの意味は "to drive a nail (into someone)" となります。

この表現は、日本における建築の工法に由来します。

かつて日本では、釘を使わずに木材を組み込んで建築を行っていましたが、後に念のために釘を打って固定するようになりました。

このことから、人に対して前もって念を押すことも、「釘を刺す」と言うようになりました。
No. 1 Ciara's correction
What great English! The only problem I found was that the style is a little stiff or formal.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that (^^)

Kacchīn (カッチーン)

Jan 15, 2018 13:33
Can you imagine the meaning of カッチーン (kacchīn), which is one of the Japanese onomatopoeia?

This word is used to express your feeling of anger against someone's behavior.

"Kacchīn" was made by emphasizing another onomatopoeia; かちん (kachin).

"Kachin" represents the sound that a small and hard thing hit something, but it can also mean one's feeling of anger.

It is thought that the reason is because an impact that something hits to your head or heart is similar to the feeling of anger.

Incidentally, when you want to use "kachin" to mean your feeling of anger, it is usually used as かちんとくる (kachin to kuru), the literal meaning of which is "the sound 'kachin' is coming."
カッチーン

「カッチーン」は擬態語の一つですが、どのような意味か想像できますか?

この言葉は、他人の行動や言動に対して、怒りの感情を表すときに使います。

「カッチーン」は「かちん」を強調した言葉です。

「かちん」は小さくて硬いものが何かにぶつかったことを表す擬音語ですが、怒りの感情を表すこともできます。

これは、頭や心に何かがぶつかる衝撃と、怒りの感情を結びつけたものだと考えられます。

ちなみに、「怒り」の意味で「かちん」を使う場合は、基本的に「かちんとくる」と言います。
No. 1 Broch (ブラック)'s correction
Excellent work! The meaning was very clear, and I learned a knew phrase: かちんとくる!

頑張ってくださいね。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and explanations!
嬉しい言葉をありがとうございます (^^)

Ii Kimi and Ii Zama (「いい気味」と「いい様」)

Jan 14, 2018 20:52
The Japanese adjective いい (ii) usually means "good" or "nice," but it sometimes implies the reverse and converys irony.

The Japanese term いい迷惑 (ii meiwaku) that I introduced you yesterday is one of the example.

There are other terms that use ironic "ii" -- for example, they're いい気味 (ii kimi) and いい様 (ii zama).

"Kimi" means "feeling" and "zama/sama" means "figure," so the literal meaning of "ii kimi" and "ii zama" are "good feeling" and "good figure," respectively.

However, actually "ii kimi" implies someone's failure or misfortune, and "ii zama" implies someone's stupid/disgraceful figure.
「いい気味」と「いい様」

日本語の「いい」は、基本的に "good" や "nice" を意味しますが、特定の単語の前に付くことで反語的に用いられることがあります。

昨日紹介した「いい迷惑」は、その用例の一つです。

その他に「いい」が反語的に使われる例としては、「いい気味」と「いい様」などがあります。

「気味」は "feeling," 「様」は "figure" を意味するので、「いい気味」と「いい様」の文字通りの意味はそれぞれ "good feeling" や "good figure" となります。

しかし実際には、「いい気味」は「他人の失敗や不幸を喜んでいい気分になること」を、「いい様」は「他人のみっともない姿をあざけること」を意味します。
No. 1 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post, Chris-san!
I learned something new (^^)
No. 2 クライド's correction
Great post, Toru! :D
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting me! (^^)

Ii Meiwaku (いい迷惑 - Real Nuisance)

Jan 13, 2018 19:11
When you get involved in something unrelated to you, you can say いい迷惑 (ii meiwaku) in Japanese.

Here 迷惑 (meiwaku) means just "nuisance."

However, いい (ii) usually means "good" or "nice," so Japanese lerners may be confused about the meaning of "ii meiwaku."

Actually, "ii" is able to be used in an ironic meaning in addition to the good meaning.

That is to say, "ii" of "ii meiwaku" contains the ironic/bad meaning.

Note that only when "ii" is attached to specific terms such as "meiwaku," it's mainly used ironically.

I'd like to introduce you to other idiomatic Japanese terms that contain the ironic "ii."
いい迷惑

自分には関係のないところで迷惑をうけることを、「いい迷惑」と言うことがあります。

「迷惑」は "nuisance" を意味します。

しかし、「いい」は通常 "good" や "nice" を意味することなので、日本語学習者は混乱してしまうかもしれません。

実は「いい」には反語的用法があります。

すなわち、「悪い」ことに対して皮肉の意味を込めて「いい」と言っているわけです。

「迷惑」などの特定の単語に「いい」がつくと、主に反語的に使われることに注意して下さい。

明日は「いい迷惑」以外の、「いい」が反語的に使われる慣用表現を紹介します。
No. 1 ダンボー's correction
However, いい (ii) usually means "good" or "nice," so Japanese lerners may be confused about the meaning of "ii meiwaku."
しかし、「いい」は通常 "good" や "nice" を意味することなので、日本語学習者は混乱してしまうかもしれません。

➡ Given that いい (ii) usually means "good" or "nice," "ii meiwaku" may throw Japanese learners into confusion.

I replaced 'however' (しかし) with 'given that'.


Actually, "ii" is able to be used in an ironic meaning in addition to the good meaning.
実は「いい」には反語的用法があります。

➡ In this expression, "ii" actually implies the reverse (of "good") and conveys irony.

I added 'in this expression' for clarity and emphasis.


Combining the two sentences:
➡ Given that いい (ii) usually means "good" or "nice," "ii meiwaku" may throw Japanese learners into confusion. In this expression, "ii" actually implies the reverse and conveys irony.


This is very interesting, thanks for sharing.
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and suggestions!
I learned new expressions! (^^)
ダンボー
You're welcome. どういたしまして。
No. 2 クライド's correction
勉強になりました!ありがとう、Toru!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction, クライド-san! (^^)

Kutakuta and Hetoheto (「くたくた」と「へとへと」 - Exhausted)

Jan 12, 2018 16:36
There are Japanese onomatopoeia, くたくた (kutakuta) and へとへと (hetoheto), both of which mean that someone is exhausted.

Both of kutakuta and hetoheto are often used in the same situation, but the degrees of tiredness that are expressed are different.

Kutakuta implies that you are tired, but you will get active if you take a little rest.

Hetoheto implies that you are exhausted, and it is difficult to you to not only move but also get up.

Also, kutakuta can be used to mean that things are shabby, but hetoheto is used to only people.

Incidentally, I'm now kutakuta.
「くたくた」と「へとへと」

日本語には疲れたことを意味する擬態語に、「くたくた」と「へとへと」があります。

どちらも似た状況でよく使われますが、表している「疲れ具合」が異なります。

「くたくた」は、疲れてはいるが、少し休めば動けるよるような状態を表します。

「へとへと」は、ひどく疲れ切って、立ち上がるのも困難な状態を表します。

また、「くたくた」は物が使い古された様子を表すこともできますが、「へとへと」は人に対してしか使えません。

ちなみに私は今、くたくたです。
No. 1 ashley林's correction
For your consideration! Cheers!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and your kind comment! :)
ashley林
You're welcome!
No. 2 Chris's correction
Chris
I'm also feeling kutakuta right now. Hopefully this tea I'm about to drink will help.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm praying that you get well soon.

Neko no Te mo Karitai (猫の手も借りたい - I Need Every Help I Can Get)

Jan 11, 2018 10:47
I would like to say the Japanese proverb 猫の手も借りたい (neko no te mo karitai) now.

猫 (neko) means "cat," 手 (te) means "hand," and 借りたい (karitai) means "to want to borrow something."

Therefore, the literal meaning of this proverb is "I want to borrow even if it is a cat hand."

Cats usually don't help us except to catch rats.

If you want to borrow such cats' hands, it will imply that you are very busy.

Because of this, this proverb means that you're busy and need every help you can get.
猫の手も借りたい

私は今、「猫の手も借りたい」と言いたいです。

「猫」は "cat," 「手」は "hand," 「借りたい」は "to want to borrow" を意味します。

したがって、このことわざの文字通りの意味は "I want to borrow even if it is a cat hand" となります。

猫は通常、ネズミを捕まえること以外には役に立ちません。

そんな猫の手でさえも借りたいということは、非常に忙しいということを示唆します。

すなわちこのことわざは、誰でもいいからとにかく助けが欲しい、それほど忙しいということを表します。
No. 1 tony's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections!
I learned the new word :)
tony
It would of course be strange to translate 誰かに手を差し伸べる as "give someone a paw" or "reach out a paw to someone". ^^

Arienai (ありえない - I Can't Believe It)

Jan 10, 2018 14:43
Young people these days often say ありえない (arienai) when incredible things happen or they are in trouble.

Originally, ありえない (arienai) is a negative form of ありえる (arieru), which means that something is possible to happen.

Therefore, the original meaning of ありえない (arienai) is that something is impossible to happen or something cannot exist.

If something that cannot happen happens, it will be an incredible thing.

Also, such incredible things can cause a troubling situation.

Because of this, it seems that ありえない (arienai) has come to mean "I can't believe it" or "I'm in trouble."
ありえない

最近の若者は、信じられないことが起きた時や、とても困った状況に陥った時、「ありえない」と言うことがあります。

もともと「ありえない」は、「ありえる」を否定にした言葉です。

このため、「ありえない」の本来の意味は、「起こり得ない」や「存在するはずがない」となります。

「起こり得ないこと」が起こったら、それは「信じられないこと」になります。

そして、「信じられないこと」は、「困った事態」を引き起こす可能性があります。

このことから、「ありえない」は「信じられない」や「困った」の意味で使われるようになったと考えられます。
No. 1 Yukinekorin's correction
^^
Toru
It's been a while, Yukinekorin-san :)
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)
Yukinekorin
You're welcome ^^ Have a great day! :)
No. 2 Zak's correction
Interesting! Thanks!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and helpful comments! (^^)
No. 3 Yun 's correction
Thank you very much for explanation.

作り話ーー>

奇跡というのは?

A:あるわけないでしょう
B:ありえないわけではない
C:あるはずだ
D:あるはずなのに..
E:あることはある..
Toru
Thank you for your comment!
Nice, from A to E are all natural Japanese.
By the way, in the lyrics of 奇跡 by コブクロ, there is a sentence something like the following:
奇跡は起こるものじゃない、起こすものなんだ。

Kaki no Tane (柿の種)

Jan 9, 2018 11:28
I'm now eating 柿の種 (kaki no tane), which is one of famous Japanese rice snacks.

柿 (kaki) means "persimmon" and 種 (tane) means "seed," so the literal meaning of 柿の種 is "seeds of a persimmon."

The etymology of "kaki no tane" is very simple -- it is because the shape of this snack is similar to seeds of a persimmon.

It is an orange color, is a bit spicy, and peanuts are often included in the same bag together.

Also, it is often served as a snack with alcohol.

When you come to Japan, please try it once.
柿の種

今私は「柿の種」を食べています。

「柿の種」は日本で有名な、米菓子の一つです。

「柿」は "persimmon," 「種」は "seed" を意味するので、「柿の種」の文字通りの意味は "seeds of a persimmon" となります。

語源は至ってシンプルで、このお菓子の形が柿の種に似ているからです。

オレンジ色で少し辛いあられで、よくピーナッツが一緒に入っています。

そして、お酒のおつまみとして親しまれています。

日本に来たら、一度試してみてください。
No. 1 eveychua's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)

Kaeru no Ko wa Kaeru (蛙の子は蛙 - Like Father, Like Son)

Jan 8, 2018 21:07
Yesterday, I talked about an idiom related to a parent tiger and its cub.

Today, I'd like to introduce you to a Japanese proverb related to a frog parent and its child; 蛙の子は蛙 (kaeru no ko wa kaeru).

蛙 (kaeru) means "frog" and 子 (ko) means "child," so the literal meaning of this proverb is "a flog child is a frog."

Larvae of frogs, tadpoles, are not similar to their parents, but as they grow up they will finally change to look like their parents, frogs.

Because of this, "kaeru no ko wa kaeru" is used to mean that the nature/ability of a child resemble his/her parents.

However, note that this proverb often contains a bad meanings, which is something like that if parents are ordinary persons, their child will be ordinary.
蛙の子は蛙

昨日は虎の親子に関する慣用句を紹介しました。

今日は、蛙の親子に関することわざ「蛙の子は蛙」を紹介します。

「蛙」は "frog," 「子」は "child" を意味するので、このことわざの文字どおりの意味は "a flog child is a flog" となります。

蛙の幼生であるオタマジャクシは、親と全く似ていませんが、成長すればいずれ親とそっくりな姿になります。

このことから「蛙の子は蛙」は、子の性質や能力は親に似ることを意味することわざとして使われます。

ただし、親が凡人であれば子も凡人であるという悪い意味合いを含むので、使う際は注意して下さい。
No. 1 pandelion's correction
Toru
Thank you very much for the corrections and the helpful comments!
I learned something new! (^^)

Tora no Ko (虎の子 - Precious Thing)

Jan 7, 2018 14:30
Do you have any important things that you never want to let go?

Such things are called 虎の子 (tora no ko) in Japanese.

虎 (tora) means "tiger" and 子 (ko) means "child," so the literal meaning of the combination is "tiger's child."

This term comes from the fact that a mother tiger cherishes her child.

In fact, general feline animals nurture their children for three to six months after they were born, whereas tigers nurture their children for eighteen to twenty-four months.

Incidentally, "tra no ko" can refer to money that has been saved, and then it's translated as "nest egg" in English.
虎の子

大切にしていて、絶対に手放したくないものはありますか?

そのようなもののことを、日本語で「虎の子」と言うことがあります。

虎は "tiger," 子は "child" を意味するので、虎の子の文字通りの意味は "tiger's child" になります。

この言葉は、虎の母親が自分の子を手元で大切に育てる事実に由来します。

一般的なネコ科の動物は生後3~6ヵ月で親離れするのに対して、虎は生後18~24ヵ月だそうです。

ちなみに、「虎の子」は将来のための貯蓄を意味することもあり、その際は "nest egg" などと訳されます。
No. 1 reririx's correction
Your English skills are really good!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I learned something new :)
No. 2 クライド's correction
Great post! Thank you for teaching me! ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting me! (^^)

Ice-cream Headache

Jan 6, 2018 18:25
I have a terrible headache.

There are various kind of headache, and one of which is called "ice-cream headache" or "cold-stimulus headache."

This headache refers to a headache that occurs during a few minutes immediately after eating cold food such as ice cream.

Various studies related to the ice-cream headache have been conducted, but because of the short symptom, the onset mechanism has not been elucidated yet.

There are two widely accepted theories about the cause of the ice-cream headache.

One is says that when the temperature in your oral cavity sharply decreases, the blood vessel leading to the head will expand reflexively in order to raise your body temperature.

The other says that when the trigeminal nerve of your throat is stimulated with a cold thing, a transmission signal is generated, and your brain misunderstands it as joint pain.
アイスクリーム頭痛

私は今、頭がとても痛いです。

頭痛にはさまざまな種類があり、その内の一つに「アイスクリーム頭痛」というものがあります。

これは、アイスクリームなどの冷たいものを食べた直後に数分程度発生する頭痛のことを表します。

アイスクリーム頭痛に関するさまざまな研究が行われていますが、すぐに収まる頭痛であるため、発症メカニズムの解明などは進んでいないそうです。

原因に関する有力な説として、次の二つがあります。

一つは、口腔内の温度が急激に低下することで、反射的に体温を上昇させるために頭に通じる血管が膨張するというものです。

もう一つは、喉の三叉神経が冷たい物で刺激され、このときに発生する伝達信号を脳が関節痛と勘違いするというものです。
No. 1 freckles's correction
We call it "brain freeze" when your head hurts after eating something cold
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the term! :)

Namae (名前 - Name)

Jan 5, 2018 17:44
Almost everything has 名前 (namae).

名前 (namae) is a term given to a thing or person, and is used for identification.

Since 前 (mae) is a term that means "organized," "complete," or "formal," you can say just 名 (na) instead of 名前 (namae).

There is a theory about the etymology about 名 (na) -- it comes from 音 (ne), which means "sound" -- but whether or not it's true is unclear.

Incidentally, a Japanese animated film 君の名は (Kimi no Na Wa - Your Name) was broadcast via television two days ago.

It was a very impressive movie.
名前

あらゆるものに、「名前」が付いています。

「名前」とは、物や人に与えられた言葉のことで、その対象を指し示す際に使われます。

「前」は「整えられた」「完全な」「正式な」などを意味する語で、「名前」は単に「名」と言うこともできます。

「名」の語源について、「音(ね)」から来ているという説がありますが、はっきりとしたことはわかっていません。

ちなみに一昨日、アニメ「君の名は」がテレビで放送されました。

とても印象的なアニメでした。
No. 1 Dane3's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting me! :)

U-Turn Rush

Jan 4, 2018 13:50
I've been staying at my parents' house in Aichi prefecture since last Friday.

Unfortunately, I have to go back to Tokyo by tonight because I have work tomorrow.

Originally, I planned to drive to Tokyo yesterday in order to have leeway, but I watched the news about "U-turn rush" and stopped departing.

"U-turn rush" means a crowded situation that occurs when people who have come to their parents' home go back (u-turn) to Tokyo for work.

The highway that I planned to use seemed to have a 31 kilometers long traffic jam.

Since many Japanese do their work from today, not only roads but also trains were very crowded yesterday.

Today I will drive on unoccupied highways in comfort.
Uターンラッシュ

私は先週金曜日から、実家に帰省しています。

そして明日から仕事があるので、今日には東京に戻らなければなりません。

もともとは1日余裕を持たせるため、昨日東京に帰るつもりでしたが、「Uターンラッシュ」のニュースを見てやめました。

「Uターンラッシュ」とは、正月に実家に帰省していた人たちが、仕事のため東京にUターンする際の混雑を意味する言葉です。

私が使う予定の高速道路は、最長31kmの渋滞だったそうです。

多くの日本人は今日から仕事が始まるため、昨日は道路だけでなく、交通機関も混雑がひどかったようです。

私は今日、空いている高速を悠々と運転します。
No. 1 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you very much for correcting my post! (^^)

Otoshidama (お年玉 - New Year's Gift Money)

Jan 3, 2018 15:35
There is a kind of New Year events called お年玉 (otoshidama), which is important for children.

Otoshidama refers to money that is given by adults to children when starting the New Year.

It is said that this tradition comes from the fact that 鏡餅 (kagami mochi - round rice cake) preparing for welcoming 歳神 (toshigami - Shinto God) were given to children
as 年玉 (toshidama) after fulfilling the role.

Here, the literal meanings of 年 (toshi) and 玉 (dama/tama) are "year" and "ball," respectively.

There are several theories about the etymology of toshidama -- one says that it comes from 年の賜物 (toshi no tamamono - year's gift), and another sayd that it comes from 年の魂 (toshi no tamashii - year's soul).
お年玉

正月の重要な行事の一つに、「お年玉」があります。

お年玉とは、新年を迎える際に贈られる金品、特に大人から子どもに与えられるものを指します。

この風習は、歳神様を迎えるために供えた鏡餅のお下がりを、「年玉」として子どもたちに与えたことに由来するそうです。

ここで、「年」は "year,"「玉」は "ball" を意味します。

「年玉」の語源に関する説は幾つかあり、「年の賜物」から来ている説や、「年の魂」から来ている説などがあります。
No. 1 PeterJ's correction
Nice English and explanation :)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Kakizome (書き初め)

Jan 2, 2018 16:32
On January 2nd in various places of Japan, a traditional event called 書き初め (kakizome) is held.

The 書き (kaki) means "to write," the 初め (some/zome) means "beginning," and this term means "art of writing using a brush and ink for the first time in the New Year."

Originally, kakizome was a ritual held at the imperial court, but it has spread among common people since the Edo period.

Also, to begin something on January 2nd is called 事始め (kotohajime - beggining things), and it's believed that it's easy to improve what you begin on that day.

That is to say, kakizome is conducted to improve your calligraphy skill.
書き初め

日本では1月2日、「書き初め」と呼ばれる伝統行事が各地で行われます。

「書き」は "to write," 「初め」は "beginning" を意味し、「書き初め」は「年が明けて初めて毛筆で書く書のこと」を表します。

もともと書き初めは宮中で行われていた儀式でしたが、江戸時代以降は庶民にも広まりました。

また、1月2日に何かを始めることを「事始め」と良い、この日に始めたことは上達しやすいと言い伝えられてきました。

すなわち、書き初めには「書道が上達するように」という願いが込められているというわけです。
No. 1 Anya's correction
This was very interesting to read! I didn't know about kakizome!
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)

Zorome (ゾロ目 - Repdigit)

Jan 1, 2018 16:56
Happy New Year.

Today is January 1st, and this is 1111th post.

When same numbers line up like this, it is called ゾロ目 (zorome) in Japanese.

"Zorome" was created by emphasizing the word, 揃い目 (soroime).

Here, the 揃い (soroi) means "to much up" or "to get together," and the 目 (me) means "pips of a dice."

Because of this, "zorome" originally meant that two dices show the same number.

These days, it has come to mean that same numbers line up.

Incidentally, there is no perfect power in zorome natural numbers composed of two or more digits (e.g., 111, 3333).
ゾロ目

あけましておめでとうございます。

今日は1月1日、そしてこれは1111回目の投稿です。

このように同じ数字が並ぶことを、「ゾロ目」と言います。

「ゾロ目」は、「揃い目」が強調された言葉です。

ここで「目」は、サイコロの目を意味します。

もともと「ゾロ目」は2つのサイコロの目が揃うことを意味していました。

これが転じて現在では、同じ数字が並ぶことも意味するようになったというわけです。

ちなみに、2桁以上のゾロ目の自然数で、累乗数のものは存在しません。
No. 1 mpjnerd's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! :)
No. 2 thethinker83's correction
I'd be very interested to see a proof of that last statement ;)

あけましておめでとうございます!
Toru
Thank you very much for correcting my post!
According to the Wikipedia, you can see the proof of that in an article, "On the Diophantine equation a(x^n-1)/(x-1)=y^q," written by Yann Bugeaud.

あけましておめでとうございます!
thethinker83
Thanks! I haven't found the specific paper yet, but it looks like related works contain a lot more math than I learned in college ^^;

New Year's Eve Events

Dec 31, 2017 17:26
In my post just one year ago, I wrote about that December 31st is called 大晦日 "omisoka" in Japanese.
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/224394078701397240103991911399205800908

Today, as I declared in the post, I will introduce you to a Japanese traditional event held in omisoka.

It is 除夜の鐘 (joya no kane), the literal meaning of which is a temple bell of December 31st night.

In this event, the temple bell is struck 108 times across midnight.

It is said that the reason is because people have 108 earthly desires, and they are purified by striking the bell.

Also, 年越しそば (toshikoshi soba) is another famous traditional event held in omisoka.

I told you about it in the following post.
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/56610173602368085034687509221862048814
大晦日の行事

私はちょうど一年前の投稿で、12月31日のことを「大晦日」と呼ぶことについて書きました。
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/224394078701397240103991911399205800908

今年の大晦日は、去年の宣言通り、大晦日に行われる伝統行事を紹介します。

それは、除夜の鐘です(12月31日の夜のことを「除夜」と言います)。

寺院の梵鐘を、深夜0時を挟んで108回つくというものです。

この理由は、人間には108の煩悩があり、これを払うためだと言われています。

また、年越しそばも、大晦日に行われる有名な伝統行事の一つです。

年越しそばについては、以下の投稿で紹介しています。
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/56610173602368085034687509221862048814
No. 1 John's correction
Good job
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Toshi no Se (年の瀬 - The End of the Year)

Dec 30, 2017 20:00
The end of the year is sometimes referred to as 年の瀬 (toshi no se) in Japanese.

The 年 (toshi) means "year" and the 瀬 (se) means "shallow area of a river."

Since the flow of water becomes faster in the shallow area of the river, it's difficult to cross over there by ship.

On the other hand, many Japanese people in the Edo period often used money on deferred payments, and they settled these bills at the end of the year.

By comparing such a rush at the end of the year with a shallow area of a river, this term 年の瀬 (toshi no se) was born.
年の瀬

日本では、年末のことを「年の瀬」と表現することがあります。

ここで「瀬」とは、川の浅いところを意味する言葉です。

川の浅いところは、水の流れが早くなるため、船で渡ることが困難です。

一方、江戸時代の日本の生活ではつけ払いが多く、年末に未払いのものをまとめて精算していたようです。

このような精算の慌ただしさや大変さを川の瀬に例えて、年の瀬という言葉が生まれたとされています。
No. 1 Kysna's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
No. 2 James's correction
I always learn new phrases and expressions from your entries. Keep it up!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting me!
I'm glad to hear you say that :)

New Year Holidays

Dec 29, 2017 15:08
Today I'd like to tell you the information about New Year holidays in Japan.

According to a survey conducted by a Japanese company, the most common last business day for Japanese workers in 2017 is today, December 29th.

This is because December 29th, 2017 is Friday.

Also, the most common first business day in 2018 seems to be January 4th.

That is to say, New Year holidays are five to six days for many Japanese workers.

Saturday and Sunday are included in them, so the actual holidays that are given specially for New Year are about three days.

I thought that this number is small, but I found that it was more than holidays of the US.
正月休み

今日は、日本人の正月休みに関する情報をお伝えします。

日本の企業が行ったアンケート調査によると、2017年の仕事納めは、本日12月29日が最も多かったようです。

これは、12月29日が金曜日であることに影響しているようです。

そして、2018年の仕事初めは、1月4日が最も多かったようです。

つまり、最も一般的な日本の社会人は、正月休みが5〜6日間だということです。

そこには土日も含まれるので、正月に特別与えられた休暇は、実質3日程度なのかもしれません。

私はこの日数は少ないなと思ったのですが、調べたらアメリカよりも多いようでした。
No. 1 Kat's correction
Good job.

Don't forget that the US also gets a holiday for Christmas, and many people use their sick leave to not work between Christmas and the new year.

If a person normally works from Monday to Friday, and if they use sick leave from the 26th to the 29th, then they can not work at all from December 23rd to January 1st.

It's the same here in Australia, except we also get a holiday on the 26th, so we only need to take 3 days off from work to get a 10 day holiday. :D
Dave
Kat, I really like your corrections and suggestions. Happy New Year.

Toru San, Thank you for the info and Happy New Year to you too.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the helpful information!

It's a very nice idea to take holidays between Christmas and the new year. First of all, I hope Christmas to be a holiday also in Japan.

> Dave san
Thank you for the comment! Best Wishes for the New Year :)
No. 2 Dave's correction
I
No. 3 TC's correction
.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Mochi (餅 - Rice Cake)

Dec 28, 2017 21:04
Today I did 餅つき (mochitsuki).

Mochitsuki is a traditional Japanese event that people make 餅 (mochi - rice cake) -- I explained about that just one year ago in the following entry.
http://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/76091474305243240897493045035997627438

Today, I'd like to talk about one accepted theory about the reason why Japanese people eat mochi on New Year holidays.

The theory says that it comes from 歯固めの儀 (hagatame no gi - teeth hardening ritual), which was held during the Heian period.

In this ritual, people ate hard food from January 1st to 3rd in order to make their teeth strong, while wishing for longevity and health.

Here mochi were used as hard food.


私は今日、餅つきをしました。

餅つきとは餅を作る日本の伝統行事のことで、そのことについてはちょうど一年前の以下の投稿で説明しています。

今日は、日本で正月に餅を食べるようになった理由について、1つの有力な説を紹介しようと思います。

それは、平安時代に行われた「歯固めの儀」に由来するというものです。

この儀式は、元日から三日まで硬いものを食べて歯を丈夫にし、長寿と健康を願います。

ここで「硬いもの」として「餅」が使われていたというわけです。
No. 1 Sharu's correction
That's a good theory !
Toru
Thank you for the comment, Sharu-san (^^)
No. 2 SecretSauce's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
> I wouldn't call mochi "hard". Perhaps difficult to chew might be a better thing to say?
Actually, we often dry mochi to keep them long. Such dried mochi are hard physically (not sticky), and they were used in hagatame no gi.
SecretSauce
I see! I didn't know that. I guess we both learned something from this entry.ありがとう! :)
Toru
My pleasure! Yes, it was a great opportunities :)

Hara wo Waru (腹を割る - Heart to Heart)

Dec 27, 2017 12:23
Sometimes it is important to talk with someone heart to heart.

To lay one's heart bare like this is expressed as 腹を割る (hara wo waru) in Japanese.

The 腹 (hara) means "stomach" and the 割る (waru) means "to split," so the literal meaning of idiom is "to split one's stomach."

Before the age of science, people seemed to believe that one’s stomach thought things, and one’s heart (mind) was located in the stomach.

Because of this, 腹を割る (hara wo waru - to split one's stomach) has come to mean to talk heart to heart.
腹を割る

時には、本心を隠さずに打ち明けることも重要です。

このように心の中をさらけ出すことを、日本語で「腹を割る」と言います。

「腹」は "stomach," 「割る」は "to split" を意味するため、「腹を割る」の文字どおりの意味は "to split one's stomach" となります。

科学が進歩する前は、脳ではなく腹が物事を考えたり、心は腹にあるものだと信じられていたようです。

このことから、「腹を割る」は現在の意味を持つようになりました。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
面白い!勉強になりました!ありがとう😊
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Yakatabune (屋形船 - Houseboat)

Dec 26, 2017 17:07
I'd like to take a 屋形船 (yakatabune) someday.

屋形船 means a Japanese style boat that is equipped with a roof and tatami mats, and it is mainly used for enjoying meals and sightseeing while cruising.

Here the 屋形 (yakata) means a mansion of nobles and the 船 (fune/bune) means a boat/ship.

Formerly, 屋形船 was used by nobles for enjoying cherry blossom viewing, moon viewing, and fireworks.

These days everyone can enjoy 屋形船, but the cost to reserve it is expensive, so it's not easy to take it.

If you have time, check for "yakatabune" or "屋形船" on Google Images.
屋形船

私はいつか、「屋形船」に乗ってみたいと思っています。

屋形船は屋根と座敷が備えられた和船のことであり、主に船上で食事や宴会、観光を楽しむ目的で利用されます。

「屋形」は "mansion," 「船」は "ship" を意味します。

かつて屋形船は、花見や月見、花火などを楽しむために、貴族に愛用されていました。

現在は誰でも楽しむことができますが、少し値も張るので、気軽に乗ることはできません。

時間があったら、屋形船を検索してみて下さい。
No. 1 Chris Granger's correction
Well-written and interesting! I had never heard of a yakatabune prior to reading this. Thanks for the informative description.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I learned something new (^^)

Kuri Bocchi (クリぼっち)

Dec 25, 2017 12:40
Merry Christmas.

Have you ever heard the Japanese term クリぼっち (kuri bocchi)?

This is a slang term born on the Internet, which means to spend Christmas on your own.

The etymology is very simple -- クリぼっち (kuri bocchi) is a compound word of the クリスマス (kurisumasu - Christmas) and the ひとりぼっち (hitori bocchi - loneliness).

Since it's a standard to spend Christmas with a lover in Japan, even if you spend with your family, it may be called クリぼっち.

Incidentally, I will work at the university until late at night as usual.
クリぼっち

メリークリスマス。

「クリぼっち」という言葉を聞いたことがありますか?

この言葉はインターネットで生まれたスラングで、クリスマスを一人で過ごすことを意味します。

「クリスマス」と「ひとりぼっち」を組み合わせた造語となっています。

日本においてクリスマスは恋人と過ごすのが定番であることから、家族と過ごす場合でも「クリぼっち」と言われることがあるようです。

ちなみに私は大学でいつもどおり夜までお仕事です。
No. 1 Sharu's correction
Merry Kurisumasu, Toru san :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Merry Kurisumasu! :)
No. 2 Priyanka's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Yoi Otoshi wo (良いお年を)

Dec 24, 2017 14:16
This year will be over in about a week.

There is a Japanese parting greeting that is used only during this time of year.

It is 良いお年を (yoi otoshi wo).

The 良い (yoi) means "good" and the お年 means "year."

This expression is short for 良いお年をお迎えください (yoi otoshi wo omukae kudasai), where the お迎えください (omukae kudasai) means something like "to wish you a prosperous something."

I think that the most similar English expression to 良いお年を is "Have a happy new year."
良いお年を

あと一週間ほどで今年が終わります。

日本語にはこの時期にだけ使われる別れの挨拶があります。

「良いお年を」です。

「良い」は "good," 「お年」は "year" を意味します。

この言葉は、「良いお年をお迎えください」を省略したものです。

英語では "Have a happy new year" が最も近い表現だと思います。
No. 1 SecretSauce's correction
You can also say, "Have a (adjective) New Year" if you want to say something unique.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Bounenkai (忘年会)

Dec 23, 2017 12:22
During this time of year, a lot of 忘年会 (bounenkai) are held in Japan.

A bounenkai is a drinking party that is held at the end of the year, in order to forget the past year.

There is no religious meaning or particular style.

The 忘 (bou) means "to forget," the 年 (nen) means "year," and the 会 (kai) means "party," so 忘年会 (bounenkai) literally means "forget the part year party."

I think that End of the Year Party is very similar to bounenkai.

Incidentally, today I will participate in a bounenkai - this is the third time this week.
忘年会

この時期、日本各地で忘年会が開催されます。

忘年会は年末に催される宴会のことで、その年の苦労を忘れるために行われます。

宗教的意味付けや、決まった様式などはありません。

「忘」は "forget," 「年」は "year," 「会」は "party" を意味し、忘年会は文字通り " forget the past year party" という意味です。

英語で言うところの "End of the Year Party" に近いと思います。

ちなみに私は今日、今週で3回目の忘年会に参加します。
No. 1 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
> Was probably just a typo, but I thought I'd point it out just in case.
Yes, it was a typo. Thank you for pointing that out :)

Mizu wo Sasu (水を差す - Casting a Damper)

Dec 22, 2017 21:38
Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese expression 話の腰を折る
(hanashi no koshi wo oru), which means to interrupt others when theyare talking.

Today I'd like to talk about the similar expression, 水を差す (mizu wo sasu).

The 水 (mizu) means "water" and the 差す (sasu) means "to put in/pour," so the literal meaning of this expression is "to put water in something."

If you put water in hot water or tasty dish, they will become tepid or thin, then they can be ruined.

Because of this, 水を差す (mizu wo sasu) has come to be used the currect meaning.
水を差す

昨日私は、「会話の邪魔をする」という意味の「話の腰を折る」という表現を紹介しました。

今日は、それと似た表現「水を差す」を紹介します。

「水を差す」は、うまくいっている物事に対して邪魔をすることを意味します。

熱いお湯や濃い料理に水を入れると、冷めたり味が薄くなったりして、台無しになってしまいます。

このことから、「水を差す」は現在の意味で使われるようになりました。
No. 1 Sharu's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections! (^^)

Hanashi no Koshi wo Oru (話の腰を折る - Interrupting when Someone is Talking)

Dec 21, 2017 20:35
Today, I sometimes interrupted others in the middle of talking.

Such an action is called 話の腰を折る (hanashi no koshi wo oru) in Japanese.

The 話 (hanashi) means "story/conversation," the 腰 (koshi) means "a lower back/waist," and the 折る (oru) means "to break," so the literal meaning of this term is "to break a lower back of conversation."

"A lower back" is a very important part of the body, and if it's hurt, it will become difficult to support your body.

Because of this, 話の腰を折る has come to mean to interrupt when someone is talking.
話の腰を折る

今日、私は何度か他人が話しているところに口をはさみ、会話を遮ってしまいました。

このような行為のことを、日本語で「話の腰を折る」と言います。

「話」は "story/conversation," 「腰」は "lower back," 「折る」は "to break" を意味するので、「話の腰を折る」の文字通りの意味は "to break a lower back of conversation" となります。

「腰」は、体の中でも重要な部分であり、少し痛めただけでも体を支えるのが困難になります。

このことからこの言葉は、会話を遮って邪魔をすることを意味するようになりました。
No. 1 pyrpoi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 piepmachientje's correction
Thank you, I learned a new Japanese idiom ^ - ^
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I learned something new! (^^)
No. 3 piepmachientje's correction
Thank you, I learned a new Japanese idiom ^ - ^
Toru
Thank you again! (^^)

How to Go to the Bathroom: Part 2

Dec 20, 2017 09:40
Yesterday, I introduced you to a common expression that is used when you want to go to the bathroom.

Today I'd like to talk about other Japanese expressions implying that you will go to the bathroom.

*お花摘みに行く* (*ohana tsumi ni iku* - I will go picking flowers): This is an expression for women.

*雉撃ちに行く* (*kiji uchi ni iku* - I will go pheasant hunting): This is an expression for men.

Originally, it seems that these expression was used to imply urinating/defecating on climbing.

This is because the posture of urinating/defecating in the grass is similar to the posture of flower picking or pheasant hunting.
トイレへの行き方 Part 2

昨日は、トイレに行くときに使う一般的な表現を紹介しました。

今日は、その他のトイレに行くことをほのめかす表現を幾つか紹介します。

「お花摘みに行く」・・・女性が用を足しに行くことを意味する表現です。

「雉撃ちに行く」・・・男性が用を足しに行くことを意味する表現です。

これら表現は、登山において用を足しに行く際に使われていたことに由来するようです。

草花の中で用を足す姿は、花摘みや雉撃ちの際の姿勢と似ているためです。
No. 1 SecretSauce's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correcting my post! :)
No. 2 なんだとコラ!'s correction
うんこしたい!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

Haha, 「うんこしたい」はとても子どもっぽい表現です :)

How to Go to a Bathroom Part 1

Dec 19, 2017 16:37
I posted an entry about how to use a toilet yesterday.

Today I'd like to tell you about how to express in Japanese that you want to go to a bathroom.

The most simple expression is that "toile ni ittekimasu" (トイレに行ってきます - I will go to a toilet).

However, such a direct expression is not elegant.

In my opinion, the most common and accepted expression is "otearai ni ittekimasu" (お手洗いに行ってきます - I will go to an otearai), here the "otearai" (お手洗い) is a place where you wash your hands.

Japanese people have been sure to wash their hands carefully after urinating/defecating since a long time ago.

Because of this, "to go to a bathroom" has come to be expressed as "otearai ni iku" (お手洗いに行く - I will go to an otearai).
トイレへの行き方 Part 1

昨日はトイレの使い方についての話題を投稿しました。

今日は、誰かと話しているときにトイレに行きたくなった場合、日本語でどのように表現すればいいかを紹介します。

もっともシンプルな言い方は、「トイレに行ってきます」です。

しかし、このような直接的な表現は上品ではありません。

個人的に最も無難でよく使われる表現は、「お手洗いに行ってきます」です。

日本では昔から、用を足した後は手を洗う習慣がありました。

このことから、トイレに行くことを「お手洗いに行く」と表現するようになりました。
No. 1 r_wozey's correction