Article Archive

These are my posts on Lang-8.

Chi mo Namida mo Nai (血も涙もない - Cold-blooded)

Mar 27, 2021 15:19
Chi mo Namida mo Nai

A ruthless person who has no human kindness can be described as 'chi mom namida mo nai' (血も涙もない).

Since 'chi' (血) means "blood," 'namida' (涙) means "tear," and 'nai' (ない) means "nothing/no," the literal meaning of 'chi mo namida mo nai' is "no blood or tears."

This phrase comes from the image that a ruthless person would not shed his/her blood or tears in any situation.

Such a person can be described using "blood" in English, such as "bloodless" or "cold-blooded."
血も涙もない

人間らしい思いやりがなく、冷酷な人のことを「血も涙もない」と形容することがあります。

「血」は "blood"、「涙」は "tear"、「ない」は "nothing/no" を意味するので、「血も涙もない」の文字どおりの意味は "no blood or tears" となります。

冷酷な人は、血を流すことも、涙を流すこともないように思えることから、この言葉が生まれました。

英語でも、そのような人間は "bloodless" や "cold-blooded" のように血を使った表現で形容されることがあります。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
  • A ruthless person who has no human kindness can be described as 'chi mom namida mo nai' (血も涙もない).
  • A ruthless person who has no human kindness can be described as 'chi mo namida mo nai' (血も涙もない).
  • Since 'chi' (血) means "blood," 'namida' (涙) means "tear," and 'nai' (ない) means "nothing/no," the literal meaning of 'chi mo namida mo nai' is "no blood or tears."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • This phrase comes from the image that a ruthless person would not shed his/her blood or tears in any situation.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Such a person can be described using "blood" in English, such as "bloodless" or "cold-blooded."
  • Such a person can be described using "blood" or "cold" in English, such as "bloodless"(?) or "cold-blooded" or "cold-hearted."
     I think "bloodless" would be used more to describe someone or something that is lifeless, or without any passion or enthusiasm.
Good job!
Toru
Thank you for the correction and comment! :)

Neko Bang Bang (猫バンバン - Knock Knock Cats)

Mar 26, 2021 12:44
Neko Bang Bang

Have you ever heard of the term 'neko bang bang' (猫バンバン)?

'Neko' (猫) means "cat," and 'bang bang' (バンバン) is an onomatopoeic phrase representing that one bangs or knocks something.

When it gets cold, cats sometimes enter the engine compartment of a stationary car in search of a narrow and warm place.

'Neko bang bang' refers to the act of banging or knocking the hood of a car to let such a cat go somewhere else. This term also refers to the effort to protect the lives of cats through such acts.

The act and term have been proposed by Nissan Motor.
猫バンバン

「猫バンバン」という言葉を聞いたことがありますか?

「猫」は "cat"、「バンバン」は何かを叩く擬音語を意味します。

猫は寒い時期になると、狭く暖かい場所を求めて、止まっている自動車のエンジンルームやタイヤの上などに入り込むことがあります。

猫バンバンとは、このような猫を逃がすためボンネットをバンバンと叩く行為、およびそれによって猫の生命を守る取り組みのことを指します。

この行為および言葉は日産自動車が提唱し、商標登録もなされています。
No. 1 Kiersten's correction
  • Neko Bang Bang
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Have you ever heard of the term 'neko bang bang' (猫バンバン)?
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Neko' (猫) means "cat," and 'bang bang' (バンバン) is an onomatopoeic phrase representing that one bangs or knocks something.
  • 'Neko' (猫) means "cat," and 'bang bang' (バンバン) is an onomatopoeic phrase representing the sound of banging or knocking on something.
  • When it gets cold, cats sometimes enter the engine compartment of a stationary car in search of a narrow and warm place.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Neko bang bang' refers to the act of banging or knocking the hood of a car to let such a cat go somewhere else.
  • 'Neko bang bang' refers to the act of banging or knocking on the hood of a car to make such a cat go somewhere else.
  • This term also refers to the effort to protect the lives of cats through such acts.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • The act and term have been proposed by Nissan Motor.
  • Taking this precaution has been promoted by Nissan Motor, who also coined the term.
     suggestion
I didn't know about it! I think it is a great initiative.
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

Neko Manma (ねこまんま - Cat's Meal)

Mar 25, 2021 12:52
Neko Manma

When I was a poor student, I often ate 'neko manma' (ねこまんま).

'Neko' (ねこ) means "cat," and 'manma' (まんま) is a baby word that means "meal."

Hence, the literal meaning of 'neko manma' is "cat's meal," but it actually refers to a frugal human's meal that looks like food for cats and dogs.

'Neko manma' can be classified into two types: rice mixed with bonito flakes and soy sauce, and rice mixed with a miso soup.

I especially like the former 'neko manma', which contains bonito flakes and soy sauce.

Incidentally, since cats have a low ability to digest carbohydrates, you should avoid giving cats 'neko manma'.
ねこまんま

苦学生時代、私は「ねこまんま」をよく食べました。

「ねこ」は "cat" を意味し、「まんま」は幼児語で "meal" を意味します。

したがって、「ねこまんま」の文字どおりの意味は "cat meal" となりますが、実際には、イヌやネコに与える簡単な餌(残飯)のように見える人間の食事を指します。

ねこまんまは大きく、米に鰹節と醤油をかけるものと、米に味噌汁などの汁物をかけるものの、2種類があります。

私は特に、鰹節と醤油をかけるタイプのねこまんまが好きです。

ちなみに、ネコは炭水化物の消化能力が低いので、上述のねこまんまをネコに与えるのは避けたほうがよいです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
  • When I was a poor student, I often ate 'neko manma' (ねこまんま).
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Neko' (ねこ) means "cat," and 'manma' (まんま) is a baby word that means "meal."
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Hence, the literal meaning of 'neko manma' is "cat's meal," but it actually refers to a frugal human's meal that looks like food for cats and dogs.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • 'Neko manma' can be classified into two types: rice mixed with bonito flakes and soy sauce, and rice mixed with a miso soup.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • I especially like the former 'neko manma', which contains bonito flakes and soy sauce.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Incidentally, since cats have a low ability to digest carbohydrates, you should avoid giving cats 'neko manma'.
  • Incidentally, since cats have a low ability to cannot digest carbohydrates well, you should avoid giving cats 'neko manma'.
     "have a low ability to" sounds like a direct translation of Japanese. Reads strange in English.
Sounds like a tasty meal for people on a budget. ^^
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
Yes, it's very cheap but the taste is decent. :)

Neko Kentei (Cat Test)

Mar 24, 2021 18:08
Neko Kentei

Today, when I was looking at cats on the Internet, I found 'neko kentei' (ねこ検定).

Since 'neko' (ねこ) means "cat" and 'kentei' (検定) means "test," the literal meaning of 'neko kentei' is "cat test."

'Neko kentei' is a test asking for knowledge to live happily with cats. It has been held annually, and about 13,000 people took the test so far.

There are three levels of the test: beginner (pass rate: 90.6%), intermediate (pass rate: 75.2%) and advanced (pass rate: 25.3%).

The beginner level test requires knowledge to live with cats without stressing cats.

The intermediate level test requires knowledge to have responsibility for the cats' lives and be happy with each other with cats.

The advanced level test requires medical knowledge about cats in addition to understanding cats' behavior and feelings.
ねこ検定

今日、猫について調べていたら「ねこ検定」というものを見つけました。

「ねこ」は "cat"、「検定」は "test" を意味するので、「ねこ検定」は "cat test" という意味になります。

ねこ検定は、猫と幸せに暮らすための知識を問う検定で、2017年から毎年1回開催しており、これまでに約13,000人が受験しています。

テストは初級、中級、上級があり、合格率はそれぞれ90.6%、75.2%、25.3%だそうです。

初級では、猫にストレスを与えることなく一緒に暮らす知識が求められます。

中級では、猫の一生に責任を持ち、お互いに幸せに過ごすための知識が求められます。

上級では、猫の行動や気持ちを理解することに加え、医療的な知識も求められます。
No. 1 なだれ's correction
  • Neko Kentei
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Today, when I was looking at cats on the Internet, I found 'neko kentei' (ねこ検定).
  • Today, when I was looking at cats on the Internet, I found the 'neko kentei' (ねこ検定).
  • Since 'neko' (ねこ) means "cat" and 'kentei' (検定) means "test," the literal meaning of 'neko kentei' is "cat test."
  • Since 'neko' (ねこ) means "cat" and 'kentei' (検定) means "test," 'neko kentei' literally means "cat test."
  • 'Neko kentei' is a test asking for knowledge to live happily with cats.
  • 'Neko kentei' tests your knowledge on how to live happily with cats.
  • It has been held annually, and about 13,000 people took the test so far.
  • It is held annually, and about 13,000 people have taken it thus far.
  • There are three levels of the test: beginner (pass rate: 90.6%), intermediate (pass rate: 75.2%) and advanced (pass rate: 25.3%).
  • There are three levels of the test: beginner (pass rate: 90.6%), intermediate (pass rate: 75.2%) and advanced (pass rate: 25.3%).
  • The beginner level test requires knowledge to live with cats without stressing cats.
  • The beginner level is about living with cats without stressing them out.
  • The intermediate level test requires knowledge to have responsibility for the cats' lives and be happy with each other with cats.
  • The intermediate level is about taking responsibility for their quality of life and living in harmony with them.
  • The advanced level test requires medical knowledge about cats in addition to understanding cats' behavior and feelings.
  • The advanced level is about feline physiology and requires medical know-how, in addition to an understanding of feline behavior and their emotions.
This is fascinating! Thank you so much for sharing!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Catalog Gift

Mar 23, 2021 19:44
Catalog Gift

Today, I received a "catalog gift" as a commemorative gift from a student who graduated from university.

I am very pleased about it.

A catalog gift is a kind of gift in which the receiver can choose his/her favorite items from a catalog listing various products.

That is to say, I have a catalog now.

When I choose one of them then post an application card, the gift will be delivered to me.

In Japan, there have been many troubles related to gift-giving since long ago.

To solve such troubles, catalog gifts have been commonly used since the 1980s.
カタログギフト

今日、大学を卒業した学生から記念に「カタログギフト」をいただきました。

とても嬉しいです。

カタログギフトとは、さまざまな商品が掲載されたカタログから、好きなものを選んで受け取ることができる形のギフトです。

すなわち、私の手元には今、カタログがあります。

そこから欲しい物を選んでハガキを出すと、手元にその商品が届くというわけです。

日本では、贈り物にまつわるトラブルが昔から多くありました。

カタログギフトは、そのようなトラブルを解消するものとして、1980年代頃より一般的に利用されるようになりました。
No. 1 Lexee's correction
  • I am very pleased about it.
  • I am very pleased aboutby it.
     Or: It made me very happy.
  • A catalog gift is a kind of gift in which the receiver can choose his/her favorite items from a catalog listing various products.
  • A catalog gift is a kind of gift in which the receiver can choose his/her favorite items from a catalog listing various products.
  • That is to say, I have a catalog now.
  • That is to say, I have a catalog now.
     This sentence is fine, but the following could sound more natural:

    "Having said all that, I now have one of these catalogs." / "Having said all that, I now have a catalog."
  • When I choose one of them then post an application card, the gift will be delivered to me.
  • When I choose one of them and then post an application card, the gift will be delivered to me.
     Note: Using "post" as a verb is British English. In America, you would say "send" instead. :)
  • In Japan, there have been many troubles related to gift-giving since long ago.
  • In Japan, there have been many troublesproblems related to gift-giving since long ago.
  • To solve such troubles, catalog gifts have been commonly used since the 1980s.
  • To solve such troublesproblems, catalog gifts have been commonly used since the 1980s.
I never knew about catalog gifts, that's cool! Great job :).
Toru
Thank you for the correction and comment!
I learned something new! :)

Kankodori (閑古鳥 - "Cuckoo")

Mar 22, 2021 14:54
Kankodori

In my post yesterday, I explained that cuckoos are not very auspicious in Japan.

A cuckoo is sometimes called 'kankodori' (閑古鳥) in Japanese.

Since 'kan' (閑) means "quiet," 'ko' (古) means "old," and 'tori/dori' (鳥) means "bird," the literal meaning of 'kankodori' is a quiet old bird.

In addition, by adding 'naku' (鳴く - meaning "call") to that, it becomes the idiom, 'kankodori ga naku' (閑古鳥が鳴く - "a cuckoo calls").

Cuckoos' call echoes lonely in mountains far from town, giving a sad impression.

Because of this, the phrase 'kankodori ga naku' became an idiom to describe a quiet store that is not prosperous.
閑古鳥

昨日の投稿で、「カッコウ」は日本であまり縁起が良くないと説明しました。

「カッコウ」は日本語で「閑古鳥」とも呼ばれます。

「閑」は "quiet"、「古」は "old"、「鳥」は "bird" を意味するので、「閑古鳥」の文字どおりの意味は "quiet old bird" となります。

また、"call" を意味する「鳴く」をつけると、「閑古鳥が鳴く」という慣用句になります。

閑古鳥の泣き声は、人里離れた山間などで寂しげに響き、物哀しい印象があります。

このことから「閑古鳥が鳴く」は、客足がなく商売が繁盛していない様子を表す慣用句となったというわけです。
No. 1 Shuuanson's correction
  • Kankodori
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In my post yesterday, I explained that cuckoos are not very auspicious in Japan.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • A cuckoo is sometimes called 'kankodori' (閑古鳥) in Japanese.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Since 'kan' (閑) means "quiet," 'ko' (古) means "old," and 'tori/dori' (鳥) means "bird," the literal meaning of 'kankodori' is a quiet old bird.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • In addition, by adding 'naku' (鳴く - meaning "call") to that, it becomes the idiom, 'kankodori ga naku' (閑古鳥が鳴く - "a cuckoo calls").
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Cuckoos' call echoes lonely in mountains far from town, giving a sad impression.
  • Cuckoos' calls echoes lonely in mountains far from town, giving a sad impression.
  • Because of this, the phrase 'kankodori ga naku' became an idiom to describe a quiet store that is not prosperous.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
This was very interesting! I'm surprised that they are regarded as quiet birds in Japan, but to be honest, I've never actually met one before, so I wouldn't know :)
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
Cuckoos might not really be quiet birds, but we have an image that cuckoos sing in a quiet place. :)

Hatodokei (鳩時計 - Cuckoo Clock)

Mar 21, 2021 18:47
Hatodokei

These days, I want to buy a 'hatodokei' (鳩時計).

Since 'hato' (鳩) means "dove" and 'tokei/dokei' (時計) means "clock," so the literal meaning of 'hatodokei' is "dove clock." However, it is refered to as "cuckoo clock" in English and "kuckucksuhr" in German.

A cuckoo clock is a clock that strikes the hours with a cuckoo's call and was first made around 1750 in the Black Forest area in Germany.

After World War II, cuckoo clocks began to be produced in Japan.

Because cuckoos are not auspicious very much in Japan, cuckoo clocks were launched under the name 'hatodokei'.
鳩時計

私は今、鳩時計を購入したいと考えています。

「鳩」は "dove"、「時計」は "clock" を意味するので、「鳩時計」の文字どおりの意味は "dove clock" となりますが、英語では "cuckoo clock"、ドイツ語では "kuckucksuhr" と呼ばれます。

鳩時計はカッコウの鳴き声で時刻を知らせてくれる時計で、1750年頃にドイツの黒い森と呼ばれるシュヴァルツヴァルト地方で作られました。

鳩時計は、戦後、日本でも生産されるようになりました。

しかし、日本では閑古鳥を意味するカッコウはあまり縁起が良くないということで、平和の象徴でもある「鳩」を製品名に使うようになったそうです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
  • These days, I want to buy a 'hatodokei' (鳩時計).
  • These days, I've been wanting to buy a 'hatodokei' (鳩時計).
     tenses
  • Since 'hato' (鳩) means "dove" and 'tokei/dokei' (時計) means "clock," so the literal meaning of 'hatodokei' is "dove clock." However, it is refered to as "cuckoo clock" in English and "Kuckucksuhr" in German.
  • Since 'hato' (鳩) means "dove" and 'tokei/dokei' (時計) means "clock," so the literal meaning of 'hatodokei' is "dove clock." However, it is referred to as "cuckoo clock" in English and "Kuckucksuhr" in German.
     You can't use "so" and "since" in the same sentence like this.
    It would be like saying 「「鳩」は ""、「時計」は "clock" を意味するので、「鳩時計」の文字どおりの意味は "" となるからです」in Japanese. Doesn't make any sense.
  • A cuckoo clock is a clock that strikes the hours with a cuckoo's call and was first made around 1750 in the Black Forest area in Germany.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • After World War II, cuckoo clocks began to be produced in Japan.
  • This sentence is perfect! No correction needed!
  • Because cuckoos are not auspicious very much in Japan, cuckoo clocks were launched under the name 'hatodokei'.
  • Because cuckoos are not very auspicious very much in Japan, cuckoo clocks were launched sold under the name 'hatodokei'.
     word order
    Also "launched" sounds weird here. It makes the cuckoo clock sound like a new cutting edge product.
Good example of the importance of localization. ^^
Toru
Thank you very much for the correction!

> ... Doesn't make any sense.
Oh, I completely forgot to add the meaning I looked up in the dictionary. Thank you for letting me know that. :)

Sure thing! Just to be clear, I was referring to the usage of "since" and "so" in the same sentence. Just copied and pasted your Japanese text as an example. ^^

Kodomobeya Ojisan (子供部屋おじさん - Middle-aged Men in Children's Rooms)

Mar 20, 2021 12:23
Kodomo-beya Ojisan

An Internet slang term, 'kodomo-beya ojisan' has come to be used since 2014.

Since 'kodomo' (子供) means "child," 'heya' (部屋) means "room," and 'ojisan' (おじさん) means "middle-aged man," the literal meaning of 'kodomo-beya ojisan' is "a middle-aged man in a child's room."

This slang term is used in a derogatory sense to describe a middle-aged man who continues to live in the child's room of his parents' house.

It can also mean a middle-aged man whose personality and lifestyle remain children.

On the Internet, 'kodomobeya ojisan' is often abbreviated as 'kodo-oji' (こどおじ).
子供部屋おじさん

2014年から使われ始めたインターネットスラングに「子供部屋おじさん」があります。

「子供」は "child"、「部屋」は "room"、「おじさん」は "middle-aged man" を意味するので、「子供部屋おじさん」の文字どおりの意味は "a middle-aged man in a child room" となります。

このスラングは、実家の子供部屋で成人後も(30〜40代になっても)暮らす人を揶揄する蔑称として用いられます。

単に子供部屋で暮らし続けていることを指すのではなく、性格や生活スタイルが子どものまま中年になってしまった人を指すこともあります。

「子供部屋おじさん」は、インターネット上では「こどおじ」とよく略して使用されます。

Shirankedo (知らんけど - "I'm not sure, tho")

Mar 19, 2021 09:24
Shirankedo

I feel that the number of people who say 'shirankedo' (知らんけど) after talking something has increased lately.

'Shiran' (知らん) means "I'm not sure" and 'kedo' (けど) is an adversative conjunction, so 'shirankedo' means "I'm not sure, though."

By saying 'shirankedo' after asserting or recommending something, you can imply that it is hearsay information and you are not responsible for that.

For example, it is used in a conversation like 'kore taberu to yaserurashii yo, shirankedo' (これ食べると痩せるらしいよ、知らんけど - "You will lose weight if you eat this, I'm not sure, though").


'Shirankedo' was originally a Kansai dialect, but it is now commonly used all over Japan, I'm not sure, though.
知らんけど

最近、発言の最後に「知らんけど」をつける人が増えたように感じます。

「知らん」は "I don't know" 、「けど」は逆接の接続詞であるので、「知らんけど」は "I don't know though" という意味になります。

何かを断言したり勧めたりした後に、「知らんけど」をつけることで、それが伝聞情報であることやその情報に責任を持てないということを、相手に伝えることができます。

例えば、「これ食べると痩せるらしいよ、知らんけど」のように使います。

「知らんけど」は関西弁ですが、現在は日本中でよく使われています。知らんけど。
No. 1 Fifi's correction
We say "But who knows" a lot in English in the same manner.
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post and letting me know the phrase! (^^)

Limited Graduation Ceremony

Mar 18, 2021 16:58
Limited Graduation Ceremony

Today, my university held a graduation ceremony at Nippon Budokan with restricted admission.

No graduates' families were allowed to attend, and only graduates and faculty members were able to attend.

Participation is not mandatory, and some graduates and faculty members were absent.

Although it was a limited graduation ceremony, I felt that it was a big change compared to the graduation ceremony last year that was canceled due to COVID-19.

Of course, attendees were required to go home promptly after the graduation ceremony.

I hope that we will be able to hold a thank-you party or a graduation party next year.
制限付きの卒業式

私の大学は今日、日本武道館で入場制限をしながら卒業式を実施しました。

卒業生の家族は参列不可で、卒業生と教員のみが出席可能でした。

欠席した卒業生や教員もそれなりにいたようです。

制限付きの卒業式ではありましたが、昨年は新型コロナウィルスの影響で中止になったことと比べると、大きな変化に感じました。

もちろん、卒業式終了後は、速やかに帰宅することが求められました。

来年には、卒業式後に謝恩会や記念パーティができるような状況になっていることを願います。
No. 1 Alisa (アリサ)'s correction
Congratulations on your graduation!
Toru
Thank you for the correction and comment!
BTW, I am a teacher and not a graduate, just to be sure. :)

I realized that after I already submitted the comment, haha

Jōhatsu (蒸発 - Evaporation/Missing)

Mar 17, 2021 23:43
Jōhatsu

Some people around me sometimes do 'jōhatsu' (蒸発).

'Jōhatsu' means "evaporation," and it usually refers to the process that a liquid changes into the gas phase.

When the subject of "evaporation/evaporate" is a person, such as 'kare wa jōhatsu shita' (彼は蒸発した - literally means "he evaporated"), it actually means "he went missing."

This expression says that just as an evaporated liquid is invisible, so is an evaporated person.

Incidentally, the process that a substance directly from the solid to the gas state is called 'shōka' (昇華 - "sublimation"), but 'shōka' is rarely used with a person as the subject.

When using it like 'kare wa shōka shita' (彼は昇華した - literally means "he sublimated"), it means something like "he became a higher state (existence) than before".
蒸発

私の周りで「蒸発」する人がまれにいます。

「蒸発」は "evaporation" を意味し、通常は液体が気体の状態になる過程のことを表します。

「蒸発」の主語を人にして、「彼は蒸発した」のように使うと、「彼は行方不明(音信不通)になった」といった意味になります。

液体が気体になると見えなくなるように、「蒸発した人」も見えないというわけです。

ちなみに、個体から気体になることは「昇華」と言いますが、人を主語にして使うことはほとんどありません。

仮に「彼は昇華した」のように使った場合、「彼は一段階高度な状態(存在)になった」のような意味になります。
No. 1 spontaneouspotato's correction
Interesting! In English, sometimes we'd (jokingly) say 'He has ascended to a different plane of existence'.
Toru
Thank you for letting me know the interesting phrase! :)

I've heard that it's relatively easy to vanish in Japan because your nation has very strict laws concerning privacy. Actually, I'm feeling rather intrigued about the people you knew who vanished into thin air/vanished without a trace...
Toru
Yes, unfortunately, there are many missing people in Japan. The disappearance is often not reported to the police, so it often ends with unknown details.

You can use "evaporate" the same way in English as well (eg. He evaporated.) but it's probably not as common as in Japanese.

I had never heard the word "sublimate." Maybe it's because I never really studied science seriously haha.
Toru
Thank you for the correction and explanation! I learned something new.
I think that about 2-30% of Japanese people understand the meaning of the term 昇華. :)

Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)

Takara no Mochigusare (宝の持ち腐れ - Better Spent Than Spared)

Mar 16, 2021 10:56
Takara no Mochigusare

I splashed out and bought a new car about a year ago.

However, COVID-19 has become pandemic since immediately after that, so I could rarely use the car.

I think that I have used my new car only about 10 times in the past year.

Such a situation can be described as 'takara no motigusare' (宝の持ち腐れ).

Since 'takar' (宝) means "treasure," 'mochi' (持ち) means "have," and 'gusare/kusare' (腐れ) means "rot," so 'takara no motigusare' means "The treasure you have is rotting."

It implies that if one does not use something useful or talented that the one has, it will be a waste.
宝の持ち腐れ

私は約1年前、思い切って車を購入しました。

しかしその直後、新型コロナウィルスが流行したため、ほとんど外出することができませんでした。

この1年で新車に乗った回数は、10回くらいだと思います。

このような状況を、「宝の持ち腐れ」と表現することがあります。

「宝」は "treasure"、「持ち」は "have"、「腐れ」は "rot" を意味するので、「宝の持ち腐れ」は "" という意味になります。

役に立つものや、才能などを持っていながら、それを活用しないでいると、腐ってしまうということです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Good example!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

Toranpu (トランプ - "Playing Card")

Mar 15, 2021 15:24
Toranpu

"Playing card" is called 'toranpu' (トランプ) in Japan.

'Toranpu' is a Japanese-English word and comes from "trump" of "trump card."

A playing card was imported from Portugal to Japan in the 16th century.

Because of this, a playing card was used to be called 'karuta' (かるた), which comes from the Portuguese "carta."

At the end of the 19th century, Japanese people came to refer to a playing card as 'toranpu'.

The reason is believed that some Westerners who entered Japan used the word "trump" repeatedly while playing cards, and Japanese people misunderstood the name of the cards as "trump."
トランプ

日本では、"playing card" のことを「トランプ」と呼びます。

「トランプ」は和製英語で、切り札を意味する "trump" から来ているとされています。

トランプは、16世紀にポルトガルから日本に伝来しました。

かつては、ポルトガル語の carta から「かるた」と呼ばれていました。

19世紀末頃、入国した欧米人がトランプで遊びながら "trump" という言葉を使っていたのを、日本人がカードの名称と勘違いし、現在のように広まったものと考えられています。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Very interesting. I didn't know that karuta came from Portugese,
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
To tell you the truth, I also learned that fact for the first time on Wikipedia the day before yesterday, haha.

Harapeko (腹ペコ - Being Hungry)

Mar 14, 2021 16:43
Harapeko

When describing that you are hungry, you can use the casual term 'harapeko' (腹ぺこ).

'Hara' (腹) means "stomach," and 'peko' (ぺこ) is short for the onomatopoeia 'pekopeko' (ぺこぺこ), which represents that something is dented.

As you can guess, this term comes from the fact that you feel your stomach is dented when being hungry.

You can also say 'onaka ga pekopeko' (お腹がぺこぺこ) without abbreviation. Here, ‘onaka’ (お腹) is a polite expression for ‘hara’ (腹).

Incidentally, the onomatopoeia 'pekopeko' can also represent that someone bows many times.
腹ぺこ

お腹が空いたことを表すカジュアルな表現として「腹ぺこ」があります。

「腹」は "stomach"、「ぺこ」は何かが凹んでいることを表す擬態語「ぺこぺこ」の省略です。

お腹が凹んでいるということは、空腹であるというわけです。

省略せずに、「お腹がぺこぺこ」のように言うこともできます。

ちなみに「ぺこぺこ」という擬態語は、何度もお辞儀をするさまを表すこともできます。
No. 1 polgee's correction
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)

Hara ga Hette wa Ikusa ga Dekinu (腹が減っては戦ができぬ - An Army Marches on Its Stomach)

Mar 13, 2021 21:40
Hara ga Hette wa Ikusa ga Dekinu

In my post yesterday, I introduced the phrase 'onaka ga heru' (お腹が減る), which means "being hungry" and is also called 'hara ga heru' (腹が減る).

There is a proverb that uses this word, 'hara ga hette wa ikusa ga dekinu' (腹が減っては戦ができぬ).

Since 'ikusa' means "battle" and 'dekinu' means "cannot," the literal meaning of this proverb is "You cannot do battle when you are hungry."

Here, "battle" implies various jobs and things, and this provern says that you need to sate your hunger first to do anything.
腹が減っては戦ができぬ

昨日は "being hungry" を意味する「お腹が減る」(「腹が減る」とも)という表現を紹介しました。

「腹が減る」を使ったことわざに、「腹が減っては戦ができぬ」があります。

「戦」は "battle"、「できぬ」は "cannnot" を意味するので、このことわざの文字どおりの意味は "" となります。

ここで "battle" は、さまざまな仕事・物事を示唆しており、このことわざは何をするにもまずは腹ごしらえが必要ということを表しています。
No. 1 rsail's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Onaka ga Heru (お腹が減る - Being Hungry)

Mar 12, 2021 23:07
Onaka ga Heru

Japanese people say 'onaka ga suku' (お腹が空く) or 'onaka ga heru' (お腹が減る) to represent being hungry.

'Onaka' (お腹) means "stomach," '空く' means "to be empty," and 'heru' (減る) means "to decrease."

That is to say, the literal meanings of 'onaka ga suku' and 'onaka ga heru' are "one's stomach is empty" and "one's stomach decreases," respectively.

You can see that "one's stomach is empty" literally means hungry, whereas you may feel that "one's stomach reduced" sounds strange.

Perhaps the subject of the verb "decrease" does not the stomach itself, but food in the stomach.

Incidentally, 'onaka ga heru' sounds a little more casual than 'onaka ga suku'.
お腹が減る

日本人は、空腹になることを「お腹が空く」や「お腹が減る」と言います。

「お腹」は "stomach"、「空く」は "to be empty"、「減る」は "to decrease" を意味します。

すなわち、「お腹が空く」と「お腹が減る」の文字どおりの意味は、それぞれ "one's stomach is empty" と "one's stomach decreases" となります。

「お腹が空く」は、文字どおり空腹を表していることがわかりますが、「お腹が減る」の文字どおりの意味は少しおかしく感じるかもしれません。

恐らく、「減る」というのは「お腹の中のもの」に対して言っているものだと思われます。

ちなみに、「お腹が減る」は「お腹が空く」よりも若干カジュアルに聞こえます。
No. 1 velo35's correction
Nice job, and I learned something from your post
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)

First International Conference in a While

Mar 11, 2021 14:37
First International Conference in a While

Today, I participated in an international conference and made a presentation in English for the first time in about two years.

It was an online conference using Zoom, but I was very nervous.

In particular, the problem was the question and answer session after my presentation.

I was not confident that I could answer English questions immediately and well.

Since the first question was simple, I managed to answer it.

However, I could not understand the intent of the second question.

Eventually, I had no idea what to say, and barely said "umm, it's a difficult question for me...," then the questioner said something like "okay" and the session was over.

I must study harder.
久しぶりの国際会議

今日は、約2年ぶりに国際会議で英語で発表しました。

Zoomを用いたオンライン会議でしたが、とても緊張しました。

発表はなんとか終わったものの、問題はその後の質疑応答です。

英語を聞き、即座にうまく答えられる自信がありませんでした。

1人目の質問は簡単な内容だったので、なんとか答えることができましたが、2人目の質問はうまく内容を理解できませんでした。

結局、なんと言ってよいかわからず、" umm, it's a difficult question for me..." と返したら "okay" のように言われて、質疑が終わってしまいました。

もっと精進します。
No. 1 yt3's correction
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)


"It was an online conference that used Zoom, but I was very nervous nonetheless." Sorry, nonetheless works better than nevertheless in that line above.
Toru
Thank you for the correction and explanation! :)

Toru
Thank you for the correction and kind explanations!

Pien Koete Paon (ぴえんこえてぱおん)

Mar 10, 2021 15:13
Pien Koete Paon

In my post yesterday, I introduced you to the net slang 'pien' (ぴえん), which represents crying.

'Pien' is often used to express a slight change in emotion.

If you want to express stronger emotions than 'pien', you can say 'pien koete paon' (ぴえんこえてぱおん).

'Koete' (こえて) means "over" or "beyond," and 'paon' (ぱおん) is short for the elephant's bark 'paōn' (ぱおーん).

In other words, this phrase represents a feeling that you want to cry loudly like an elephant, beyond the feeling of 'pien'.

You can also say just 'paon' instead of 'pien'.
ぴえんこえてぱおん

昨日は、泣いていることを表すネットスラング「ぴえん」を紹介しました。

「ぴえん」は、ちょっとした感情の変化を表す際によく使われます。

「ぴえん」よりも感極まっていることを表したい場合には、「ぴえんこえてぱおん」と言うことがあるようです。

「こえて」は "over" や "beyond"、「ぱおん」は象の鳴き声「ぱおーん」を省略したものです。

すなわち、「ぴえん」という感情を通り越して、象のように大声で泣きたい気持ちになっていることを表しているわけです。

単に「ぴえん」の代わりに「ぱおん」と使われることもあります。
No. 1 Mhtyhr's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
Actually, some lang-8 users changed my sentence "I introduced the term ..." into "I introduced you to the term ..." several times. However, is the phrase "I introduce you to something" grammatically wrong?

Pien (ぴえん - Sobbing)

Mar 9, 2021 12:30
Pien

Have you ever heard of the term 'pien' (ぴえん)?

'Pien' is an onomatopoeia that represents crying, which has been widely used among young Japanese people on SNSs since around the end of 2018.

'Pien' came from the voice when a child crying, 'piēn' (ぴえーん), and you can feel free to use the term in various situations such as you are sad or happy.

In addition, it is often used with an emoticon that has moist eyes and a troubled face (Pleading Face); the emoticon itself is sometimes called 'pien'.

In fact, the emoticon will appear when converting with ぴえん on recent smartphones.
ぴえん

「ぴえん」という言葉を聞いたことがありますか?

「ぴえん」は、日本のSNSで2018年末頃から若者の間で広く使われるようになった、泣いているさまを表す擬態語です。

「ぴえん」の由来は泣き声の「ぴえーん」であり、悲しいときにも嬉しいときにも、気軽に使うことができます。

目を潤わせて困った顔をした顔文字とともに用いられることが多く、その顔文字自体が「ぴえん」と呼ばれることもあります。

実際、最近のスマートフォンでは「ぴえん」で変換すると、その顔文字が出てきます。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
I'm curious when you would use ぴえん in a happy situation.
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
I think that ぴえん in a happy situation is used when a significant event has occurred or you are extremely happy. For example, 「大学に合格した!ぴえん」.
To tell you the truth, I have rarely used ぴえん, because I am not so young, haha.

Sounds like tears of joy ^^

International Women's Day

Mar 8, 2021 11:13
International Women's Day

Today, March 8 is International Women's Day.

The United Nations has designated March 8 as International Women's Day since 1987, and various events have been held in the world.

However, I heard the news that a Swedish ambassador to Japan said that he does not like this day.

According to the news, he said "It is strange to celebrate only this day as Women's Day," "Why can we celebrate even though we are in an unequal state," and "Every day should be a day of gender equality."

Indeed, I think that that is right.

On this day, it is perhaps better to think and discuss gender equality than to celebrate.
国際女性デー

今日、3月8日は「国際女性デー」です。

国連は1975年の3月8日以来、この日を「国際女性デー」と定め、世界でさまざまなイベントが行われてきました。

しかし、スウェーデンの駐日大使の方は、「国際女性デーが嫌い」と話しているというニュースを耳にしました。

曰く、「この日だけを女性デーとして祝うのはおかしい」「そもそも不平等な状態なのにどうして祝うのか」「毎日が男女平等の日であるべき」ということだそうです。

確かに、そのとおりのようにも思います。

この日は、祝う日ではなく、男女平等について考え議論する日、とすればよいのかもしれません。
No. 1 ジミー's correction
I think that they should talk about this in schools because the young kids are the ones who will grow up and become the teachers, doctors, and politicians of the future.
.
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

> or do you mean, "However, I heard the news that a Swedish ambassador went to Japan and said that he does not like this day"?
No, I wanted to say something like "a Swedish ambassador working at the Embassy of Sweden in Tokyo said that ..." (my dictionary says that such a person is referred to as "an ambassador to Japan").

> I think that they should talk about this in schools...
Yes, I agree with it.

ok then just go with "However, I heard the news that a Swedish ambassador working in Japan said that he does not like this day."
Toru
Thank you! :)

Omagari Neko (尾曲がり猫 - Cats with Bent Tails)

Mar 7, 2021 16:41
Omagari Neko

Yesterday, I introduced you to the term 'kagishippo' (かぎしっぽ), which represents a tail of a cat bent like a key.

Such cats with 'kagishippo' are also called as 'omagari neko' (尾曲がり猫).

'O' (尾) means "tail," 'magari' (曲がり) means "tail," and 'neko' (猫) means "cat," so 'omagari neko' literally means a cat with a bent tail.

To tell you the truth, there are many such cats in Japan.

In particular, about 80% of cats are 'omagari neko' in Nagasaki prefecture.

It is said that this is because Japanese people have believed that cats with long and straight tails could become monsters called 'nekomata' (猫又) and have especially cherished cats with short and bent tails.
尾曲がり猫

昨日は、鍵のように曲がっている猫のしっぽを表す「かぎしっぽ」という言葉を紹介しました。

「かぎしっぽ」を持つ猫のことを、「尾曲がり猫」とも言います。

「尻」は "tail"、「曲がり」は "bent"、「猫」は "cat" を意味するので、「尾曲がり猫」は文字どおり "a cat with a bent tail" となります。

尾曲がり猫は縁起がよいとされていますが、実は日本にはそのような猫が多く生息しています。

特に長崎県では、約80%の猫が尾曲がり猫だそうです。

この理由の一つに、日本では長くてまっすぐな尻尾を持つ猫は「猫又」という妖怪になるとされ、短いしっぽや曲がったしっぽを持つ猫が愛されていたからという説があります。
No. 1 katyenka's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction and explanation! :)

Since "believe" is a stative verb like "resemble" or "know," it might be a little weird (or, it could give different nuances) to use it in the past participle.

Kagishippo (かぎしっぽ - Kinked Tail)

Mar 6, 2021 22:07
Kagishippo

There are many stray cats living around my apartment.

Around noon today, a stray cat that crossed in front of me had 'kagisippo' (かぎしっぽ).

'Kagi' (かぎ) means "key," 'shippo' (しっぽ) means "tail," and 'kagishippo' (かぎしっぽ) is a term for representing a tail of a cat bent like a key.

A cat's tail is commonly composed of 18 to 20 coccygeal vertebrae, and it becomes 'kagishippo' when a part of the coccygeal vertebrae deforms or fuses.

Cats with 'kagishippo' have been believed to protect property in Japan and China, and they have been cherished as auspicious cats.

Also in European countries, it seems that such cats are treated as auspicious cats.
かぎしっぽ

私のアパートの周りには野良猫がたくさん住んでいます。

今日の昼頃、私の目の前を横切った野良猫は、「かぎしっぽ」をしていました。

「かぎ」は "key"、「しっぽ」は "tail" を意味し、「かぎしっぽ」は鍵のように曲がった猫のしっぽを表す言葉となっています。

猫のしっぽは一般的に、18~20個の尾椎で構成されており、尾椎の一部がくっついたり変形したりすると、かぎしっぽになるようです。

かぎしっぽの猫は、日本や中国では「財産を守ってくれる」と言われ、縁起のよい猫として大事にされてきました。

また、ヨーロッパでは「幸せをひっかけてくる」と言われ、やはり縁起のよい猫とされているようです。
No. 1 ハイジ's correction
My cat was a stray I picked up off the street and he had a kinked tail. I think he was part Siamese. That might explain why he had a kink in his tail! I suppose Thai people think kinked-tail cats bring good luck!
Toru
Sounds nice!
> bring good luck!
This is exactly what I wanted to say in my last sentence. I heard that people in European countries also think that such kinked-tail cats bring good luck (cats with kinked tails could hook you good luck).

The average American doesn't know the word "auspicious", so they'd probably say "bring good luck" instead.

Toru
Thank you for the correction!
I understand well! :)

Jūbako no Sumi wo Tsutsuku (重箱の隅をつつく - Quibbling on Insignificant Detail)

Mar 5, 2021 12:51
Jūbako no Sumi wo Tsutsuku

In my post the day before yesterday, I introduced the word 'jūbako' (重箱), which means multitiered boxes in which food is stored.

There is an idiom that uses this word, 'jūbako no sumi wo tsutsuku' (重箱の隅をつつく).

Since 'sumi' (隅) means "corner" and 'tsutsuku' (つつく) means "to poke," the literal meaning of 'jūbako no sumi wo tsutsuku' is "to poke a corner of multitiered boxes for storing food."

Since the shape of 'jūbako' is a rectangular parallelepiped, some food often remains in the corners.

Compared to poking and eating the food left in the corner of 'jūbako', this idiom means to pick up insignificant things and quibble about that.

I do not like to quibble about insignificant things, but I want to eat the food left in the corner of 'jūbako'.
重箱の隅をつつく

一昨日の投稿で、重ねることができる料理を入れる箱を意味する「重箱」という言葉を紹介しました。

「重箱」を使った慣用句に「重箱の隅をつつく」というものがあります。

「隅」は "corner"、「つつく」は "to pick" を意味するので、「重箱の隅をつつく」の文字どおりの意味は "to pick a corner of multitiered boxes for storing food" となります。

重箱は直方体であるため、隅には料理の一部が残ることがあります。

その隅に残った料理をつついて食べることから、この慣用句は「ささいなことを取り上げ難癖をつけること」という意味を持ちます。

私は、難癖をつけるのは好きではありませんが、重箱の隅に残った料理はしっかりと食べたいです。
No. 1 Silberfee's correction
Toru
Thank you for checking my post! :)

We say "to nitpick". Unlike your idiom which is about finding the last bits of food in a box, ours is about looking for louse eggs in someone's hair.

BTW - I'm impressed by your use of the term rectangular parallelepiped !!!
Toru
Thank you for letting me know that!
I learned something new! (^^)

Yutō Yomi (湯桶読み - Mixed Reading of Japanese and Chinese)

Mar 4, 2021 13:26
Yutō Yomi

I introduced you to the expression 'jūbako yomi' (重箱読み) yesterday, which means a term that is read as a mixture of a Chinese reading and a Japanese reading.

When the order of Chinese and Japanese readings is reversed, it is called 'yutō yomi' (湯桶読み).

'Yu' (湯) means "hot water," 'tō' (桶) means "bowl," and 'yutō' (湯桶) means a traditional Japanese beverage container.

Here, 'yu' is a Japanese reading and 'tō' (桶) is a Chinese reading.

Since 'yomi' (読み) means "reading," 'yutō yomi' means a term that is read as a mixture of a Japanese and a Chinese reading in this order.

Incidentally, 湯桶 can read as 'yuoke' with only Japanese reading, in which case it generally means "wash-basin."
湯桶読み

昨日は音読みと訓読みの漢字が混ざった熟語を表す「重箱読み」という表現を紹介しました。

音読みと訓読みの漢字の順番が逆である場合は、「湯桶読み」といいます。

「湯(ゆ)」は ""、「桶(とう)」は "" 、そして「湯桶(ゆとう)」は "" を意味します。

ここで、「湯」は訓読み、「桶」は音読みとなっています。

「読み」は "reading" を意味するので、「湯桶読み」とは「湯桶」のように訓読みと音読みが混ざった読み方を意味する表現というわけです。

ちなみに「湯桶」はすべて訓読みで「ゆおけ」と読むこともでき、このときの一般的な意味は「入浴用の桶」となります。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Cool!
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)

Jūbako Yomi (重箱読み - Mixed Reading of Chinese and Japanese)

Mar 3, 2021 20:32
Jūbako Yomi

In my post yesterday, I explained that it is not standard to read 代替 as 'daigae' (だいがえ).

When the reading of 代替 is 'daigae' (だいがえ), 代 is the Chinese reading, whereas 替 is the Japanese reading.

The combination of the Chinese and Japanese readings in this way is called 'jūbako yomi' (重箱読み) in Japanese.

'Jū' (重) means "overlap," 'bako/hako' (箱) means "box," and the combination 'jūbako' (重箱) means multitiered boxes in which food is stored.

Here, 'jū' is the Chinese reading, and 'bako' is the Japanese reading.

In addition, 'yomi' (読み) means "reading."

That is to say, 'jūbako yomi' means a term that is read as a mixture of a Chinese reading and a Japanese reading like 'jūbako'.
重箱読み

昨日の投稿で、「代替」を「だいがえ」と読むのは規範的ではないと説明しました。

「代替」の読みが「だいがえ」であるとすると、「代」は音読み、「替」は訓読みとなります。

このように、音読み(漢語)と訓読み(和語)が結合した読み方のことを「重箱読み」といいます。

「重」は "overlap"、「箱」は "box" を意味し、「重箱」はハレの日の料理を入れる、重ねることができる箱を差します。

ここで、「重」は音読み、「箱」は訓読みとなっています。

また、「読み」は "reading" を意味します。

すなわち「重箱読み」とは、「重箱」の意味は関係なく、「重箱」のように音読みと訓読みが混ざった読み方を意味する表現というわけです。
No. 1 spontaneouspotato's correction
Very natural, not much correction needed. Good work!
Toru
Thank you for the comment!
I'm glad to hear you say that. (^^)

Very useful. Thanks for sharing!
Toru
  • The word 'jubako' is itself a 'jubako yomi'

    This sentence was hard to understand. Was this what you meant?

Thank you for correcting my post!

>> The word 'jubako' is itself a 'jubako yomi'
> This sentence was hard to understand. Was this what you meant?

Yes, this is what I wanted to mean. :)

Daitai (代替 - Alternative)

Mar 2, 2021 09:45
Daitai

Yesterday, I was working all day and could not write a post on Lang-8.

My daily English learning goal on Lang-8 is to write more than 100 words.

In my work yesterday, I wrote over 1000 English words, so I would like to regard this task as 'daitai' (代替) of yesterday's learning goal.

Since the kanji 替 is often used in the readings of 'kae' (かえ) or 'gae' (がえ), I feel that many Japanese people mistakenly read 代替 as 'daigae'.

To tell you the truth, the reading 'daigae' is listed in Japanese dictionaries as a special reading, but it is not a normative one.
代替

昨日は起きてから寝るまでずっと仕事をしていて投稿できませんでした。

Lang-8での私の英語学習のノルマは、1日100単語以上です。

昨日は仕事の中で、1000単語以上の英作文をしたので、これを学習ノルマの「代替」としたいと思います。

「代替」の「替」の字は、「かえ」や「がえ」と読み方で使われることが多いためか、「だいがえ」と誤って読む日本人が多く感じます。

「だいがえ」という読み方は、特殊な読み方(重箱読み)として国語辞典にも掲載されているようですが、規範的なものではありません。
No. 1 FireWolf's correction
I can't find any mistakes. Good job!
Toru
Thank you for reading my post!

I didn't know that! ^^ Thank you for sharing! I feel informed!
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! ^^
Toru
Please let me ask you a question.
In the last sentence, the word "normative" changed to "common." However, I also explained that "many Japanese people mistakenly read 代替."
In other words, my explanation implied that the wrong reading is common. I wanted to say something like that the reading is common but is not normative. Here, I used "normative" to mean "a correct rule," but should I avoid using "normative"?

It just sounded unnatural to me! ^^; If you want to use the word "normative", maybe something like this would be a little better?
"To tell you the truth, 'daigae' is listed in Japanese dictionaries as a special way to pronounce the word, but it is not a normative use of that term."
To be honest, using "normative" in this sentence is not normative! > v <
Toru
Thank you for the explanation!
I would like to consider using "standard" instead of "normative." "Standard" may be similar to "common," but I think that it is closer to what I wanted to say - 'kihanteki' (規範的).
(My dictionary says that 'kihanteki' is "canonical," "normative," or "prescriptive.")

Oh, standard would be an excellent word to use! ^^ Great idea!

Ping Pong Dash (ピンポンダッシュ - Ding-dong Ditch)

Feb 28, 2021 16:04
Ping Pong Dash

Recently in Japan, food delivery services such as "Uber Eats" and "Demaekan" have become widespread, but I heard that "DoorDash" has the top market share in the US.

I also heard that "DoorDash" came to Japan in January 2021.

It seems to provide high-quality service, but the company name could be liable to remind Japanese people of 'ping pong dash' (ピンポンダッシュ).

'Ping pong' (ピンポン) is the sound of a doorbell, 'dash' (ダッシュ) literally means "dash," and 'ping pong dash' means mischief that someone rings a doorbell and runs away.

Strictly speaking, this act is criminal, and you could be charged in "violation of anti-nuisance regulations" or "house-breaking," so please do not do that.
ピンポンダッシュ

日本では最近「Uber Eats」や「出前館」というフードデリバリーサービスが浸透してきていますが、アメリカでは「ドアダッシュ」のシェアが1位になっていると聞きました。

2021年1月、「ドアダッシュ」は日本にも進出したようです。

とても優れたサービスを提供するようですが、この企業名は日本では「ピンポンダッシュ」を連想する恐れがあります。

「ピンポン」は家の呼び鈴の音(卓球ではありません)、「ダッシュ」は "dash" のことで、「ピンポンダッシュ」は呼び鈴を押して走って逃げるイタズラのことを表します。

厳密には「迷惑防止条例違反」や「住居侵入罪」に該当する犯罪行為ですので、決してしないようにしてください。
No. 1 ハイジ's correction
Many exported products have failed because they had a name that didn't sound good in the target country's language. BTW, in English, the onomatopoeia for the sound of a doorbell is "ding-dong".

Personally, to me "ding-ding" is the sound of the bell on a bike.
Toru
Thank you so much for letting me know that!
Ah, although my dictionary said "ding-dong ditch," I mistakenly wrote "ding ding ditch." :P

No worries!

Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! ^^

Asemizu wo Tarasu (汗水をたらす - Sweating Over One's Work)

Feb 27, 2021 23:05
Asemizu wo Tarasu

I have been working while doing 'asemizu wo tarasu' (汗水をたらす) lately.

'Ase' (汗) means "sweat," 'mizu' (水) means "water," and 'tarasu' (たらす) means "to drop (something)," so the literal meaning of 'asemizu wo tarasu' is "to drop sweat" or "sweat drops."

As you can guess, this idiom implies that you work so much that you sweat.

Of course, I am not actually sweating because it is cold.

In English, it can be expressed as "to sweat over one's work" or "to break one's back."
汗水をたらす

私は最近、汗水をたらして働いています。

「汗」は "sweat"、「水」は "water"、「たらす」は "drop" を意味するので、「汗水をたらす」の文字どおりの意味は "" となります。

汗がたれるほど、一生懸命働いているさまを表す慣用句となっています。

実際には寒いので、汗はたれていません。

英語では、"sweat over one's work" や "break one's back" などと言うようです。
No. 1 Anya's correction
Well done, no errors! むりにしないでください!
Toru
Thank you for your explanation and kind comment! :)

Iki wo Nomu Utsukushisa (息を呑む美しさ - Breathtaking Beauty)

Feb 26, 2021 17:29
Iki wo Nomu Utsukushisa

Lately, I work while seeing natural landscape videos on a display installed at the back of my desk.

I played a Russian landscape video today.

The beautiful scene was played continuously, but the scenery of jewel-like ice (probably Lake Bikal) was breathtaking.

In the last Japanese sentence, I added 'iki wo nomu' (息を呑む) before 'utukushisa' (美しさ), meaning "beauty."

'Iki' (息) means "breath" and 'nomu' (呑む) means "to drink/swallow."

That is to say, 'iki wo nomu' implies that you are so surprised that you hold your breath for a moment, and it can emphasize adjectives.

Today's work did not go well very much because I was fascinated by the video.
息を呑む美しさ

最近私は、机の奥に設置したディスプレイに、自然の映像を流しながら仕事をしています。

今日は、ロシアの景色を流していました。

美しい映像が続きましたが、特に宝石のような氷が広がる景色(バイカル湖でしょうか?)は、息を呑む美しさでした。

直前の文で私は、"beauty" を意味する「美しさ」に「息を呑む」という言葉をつけました。

「息」は "breath"、「呑む」は "drink" や "swallow" を意味します。

すなわち「息を呑む」とは「息が一瞬止まるほど驚くこと」を表し、形容詞を強調するはたらきを持ちます。

素晴らしい映像に見とれたため、仕事はあまり捗りませんでした。
No. 1 SlowAndSteady's correction
If you are negatively surprised, you can say you "gasped". Positively, you can say something "took my breath away."
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post and letting me know that! :)

Mogo Mogo (もごもご - Muttering) and Mogu Mogu (もぐもぐ - Nom Nom)

Feb 25, 2021 16:45
Mogo Mogo and Mogu Mogu

In my yesterday's post, I explained that the onomatopoeic phrase 'mogo mogo' (もごもご) could represent that someone talks while eating something.

After that, I searched for the phrase in an online Japanese dictionary and found that the meaning of 'mogo mogo' is the same as 'mogu mogu' (もぐもぐ).

'Mogu mogu' means 1) someone chews or says something without opening one's mouth enough, 2) something moves slowly.

It is probably true that 'mogo mogo' and 'mogu mogu' can be interchangeable, but I think that almost all Japanese people use these two in different cases as follows:

Mogo mogo: someone mutters something, or something moves slowly.

Mogu mogu: someone chews and eats something.
「もごもご」と「もぐもぐ」

昨日の投稿の中で、「もごもご」は「何かを食べながら話すことを表す擬声語」と紹介しました。

その後、日本語の辞書で調べたところ、「もごもご」の意味は「もぐもぐ」と同じで、「口を十分に開けずに物をかんだりものを言ったりするさま」「何かがゆっくりと動くさま」とありました。

確かに文章中の「もごもご」と「もぐもぐ」は交換可能かもしれませんが、ほとんどの日本人は、これら2つを以下のように使い分けていると思います。

もごもご:はっきりとものを言わないさま、何かがゆっくりと動くさま

もぐもぐ:物をかんだり食べたりするさま
No. 1 Fifi's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Munya Munya (むにゃむにゃ - Muttering)

Feb 24, 2021 17:05
Munya Munya

Muttering words that do not make sense is sometimes expressed by an onomatopoeia, 'munya munya' (むにゃむにゃ).

This onomatopoeia was probably made just by imitating someone's words that do not make sense; there is no complex etymology.

An online dictionary says that one of the meanings of 'munya munya' is "talking with food in one's mouth," however, I think that this description is wrong.

'Munya munya' can express that one chews and eats food slowly, whereas the most appropriate onomatopoeia, which means to talk with food in one's mouth, is 'mogo mogo' (もごもご).
むにゃむにゃ

意味のわからない言葉をつぶやくさまを、「むにゃむにゃ」という擬声語で表現することがあります。

恐らく、深い語源はなく、意味のわからない発言の音を単に表現しようとして生まれた言葉だと思われます。

「むにゃむにゃ」は特に、寝ぼけているときの不明瞭な発言や、意味不明な寝言を表す際によく使われます。

あるオンライン辞書では "talking with food in one's mouth" とありましたが、 口に食べ物を入れながら話すことを「むにゃむにゃ」とは普通言わないと思います。

「むにゃむにゃ」は、食べ物をゆっくり噛んで食べることを表すことはありますが、食べながら話すことを表す擬声語としては、「もごもご」が最も近いと思います。
No. 1 Lewern's correction
The main lesson to take away from this entry is that 'onomatopoeia' is more of a concept than a catch-all noun that you would put a definite article in front of. In English, we like to define things with precise details even when it's not really necessary, which is very different from Japanese! So, just a minor issue. Otherwise, I was very impressed with your English.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I learned something new. And I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

The Emperor's Birthday (2019-)

Feb 23, 2021 11:02
The Emperor's Birthday (2019-)

Today, February 23 is a Japanese national holiday called "the Emperor's Birthday."

The purpose of this holiday is literally to celebrate the emperor's birthday.

This entry implies that the current Japanese emperor Tokuhito who has reigned since May 1, 2019, born on February 23.

Until April 30, 2019, The Emperor's Birthday was December 23, which is the birthday of the former emperor Akihito.

(I wrote a post introducing the Emperor's Birthday also on December 23, 2015.)

On this day, various events are usually held in the emperor's court; however, last year and this year, these events were canceled in light of the current situation where COVID-19 is spreading.
天皇誕生日(2019年~)

今日2月23日は天皇誕生日、祝日です。

この祝日は、「天皇の誕生日を祝う」ことを趣旨としています。

2019年5月1日より在位中の天皇徳仁陛下の誕生日が、2月23日というわけです。

2019年4月30日までは、先代天皇明仁階下の誕生日である12月23日が、祝日でした。

(2015年12月23日にも、天皇誕生日を紹介する記事を投稿していました。)

この日、宮中では祝賀の義などの行事が催されるのが通例ですが、今年は昨年に続き、新型コロナウィルス感染拡大の現状に鑑み、中止となっています。
No. 1 ebh's correction
Interesting!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Nice post.
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)

Ichi wo Kiite Jū wo Shiru (一を聞いて十を知る - A Word Is Enough to the Wise)

Feb 22, 2021 17:47
Ichi wo Kiite Jū wo Shiru

When I was a child, my grandmother told me "Become a person who can 'ichi wo kiite jū wo shiru' (一を聞いて十を知る)."

Since 'ichi' (一) means "one," 'kiite' (聞いて) means "to listen," 'jū' (十) means "ten," and 'shiru' (知る) means "to understand," the literal meaning of 'ichi wo kiite jū wo shiru' is "to listen to one and understand ten."

In other words, this phrase means to understand the whole thing by just listening to a piece of information, and you can use this to describe a very wise person.

In my self-assessment, I am a person who can listen to seven to eight and understand ten.

Sometimes I become a person who listens to about thirteen to understand ten.

I will put more effort.
一を聞いて十を知る

私は幼い頃、祖母に「『一を聞いて十を知る』ことができる人になりなさい」と言われました。

「一」は "one"、「聞いて」は "to listen"、「十」は "ten"、そして「知る」は "to understand" を意味するので、「一を聞いて十を知る」の文字どおりの意味は "to listen to one and understand ten" となります。

すなわちこの言葉は、物事の一端を聞いただけで全体を理解することを意味し、非常に賢い人を形容する際に使用することができます。

私の自己評価では、「7~8を聞いて10を知る」くらいでしょうか。

ときどき、「12を聞いて10を知る」くらいになっているようにも感じます。

精進します。
No. 1 リン's correction
よくできていますね!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Ohisashi-buri Desu (お久しぶりです - It's been a long time)

Feb 21, 2021 14:28
Ohisashi-buri Desu

These days, I have been so busy that I could not afford to post on Lang-8.

However, English is still essential in my work and life, so I would like to do my best again from today.

At the beginning of this post, I wrote 'ohisashi-buri desu' (お久しぶりです).

'O' (お) is a polite prefix, 'hisashi' (久し) means "a long time has passed," 'buri' (ぶり) means "the degree of time passed," and 'desu' (です) is a polite suffix.

That is to say, 'ohisashi-buri desu' literally means "It's been a long time" or "Long time no see."

When using this phrase to a close person such as friends or family, it is common to remove the polite parts and say just 'hisashi-buri' (久しぶり).
お久しぶりです。

ここ最近は仕事が忙しくて、投稿や添削をする余裕がありませんでした。

しかし、やはり英語は私の人生で必須なものなので、これからまた頑張りたいと思います。

この記事冒頭で私は「お久しぶりです」と書きました。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「久し」は長い時間が経過したこと、「ぶり」は日時の経過の程度、「です」は丁寧の接頭辞を表します。

すなわち「お久しぶりです」は、文字どおり "It's been a long time" や "Long time no see" といった意味になります。

友人や家族など親しい相手に使う際は、丁寧語を取り除いて「久しぶり」と言います。
No. 1 Silberfee's correction
Toru
Thank you for reading my post!

Tajitatan (多事多端 - Eventful)

Nov 15, 2019 22:30
Tajitatan

This is the first post for a month.

I could not write English essays on Lang-8 because I have been given a lot of work from several facilities.

To describe situations where you need to do many things and are busy, you can say the four-character idiom 'tajitatan' (多事多端).

Since 'ta' (多) means "many," 'ji' (事) means "thing," and 'tan' (端) means "beginning/edge," the literal meaning of 'tajitatan' is "many things and beginnings."

As you can image, a situation where there are many things that you have to begin is a very busy situation.
多事多端

1ヶ月ぶりの投稿となります。

最近私は大学の用務が忙しく、英語のエッセイを書けませんでした。

このようにするべき仕事が多く忙しいことを「多事多端」と言います。

「多」は "many"、「事」は "thing"、「端」は "beginning/edge" を意味するので、「多事多端」の文字どおりの意味は "many things and beginnings" となります。

多くの始めるべき事があるような状況は、忙しい状況であるというわけです。
No. 1 DanielC54's correction

Typhoon No. 19

Oct 14, 2019 22:55
Typhoon No. 19

A super large typhoon, Typhoon No. 19, hit Japan from October 12th to 13th.

The typhoon, which is also called as "Hagibis," belongs to Category five in hurricane indicators.

There were various damages caused by this typhoon -- especially the damage of river break and river flooding seems to be severe.

At present, it has been confirmed that 21 rivers broke, and 142 rivers are flooded.

In addition, 30 people died and 15people were missing.

Rescue and recovery efforts are still being carried out in various places.

It is my sincere wish that the damage will not be magnified any more.
台風19号

10月12日から13日にかけて、超大型の台風19号が日本を直撃しました。

「ハギビス」とも呼ばれる台風19号は、ハリケーンに使用されるカテゴリーの最大レベル5に匹敵します。

この台風による被害はさまざま出ていますが、特に豪雨による河川の決壊は氾濫の被害が大きいようです。

現時点で、決壊は21河川、氾濫は142河川で確認されています。

また、死者数は30人、行方不明者数は15人となっています。

現在も各地で救助・復旧作業が行われています。

これ以上被害が大きくならないことを切に願います。
No. 1 Zara's correction
Interesting essay, the typhoon had a big impact.

I hope you were out of harms way and life gets back to normal, or as normal as it can get, soon.

Unlucky Coins Part 2

Oct 14, 2019 22:29
Unlucky Coins Part 2

Yesterday, I introduced 'jūen-dama' (十円玉 - "ten-yen coin") and 'gohyakuen-dama' (五百円玉 - "five-hundred-yen coin"), which are unpopular/unlucky coins as offertory money, and explained the reason for the former.

The reason for the latter is as follows:

'Dama/tama' (玉) meaning "coin" can be rephrased as 'kōka' (硬貨).

'Kōka' (硬貨) has the same sound as 効果, which means "effect."

In addition, the most expensive coin in Japan is "five-hundred-yen coin."

In other words, there are no coins (effects) larger than that.
縁起の悪いお賽銭 Part 2

昨日はお賽銭に縁起の悪い硬貨として「十円玉」と「五百円玉」を紹介し、「十円玉」の理由を説明しました。

「五百円玉」が縁起が悪いとされる理由は、次のようなものです。

"Coin" を意味する「玉」は、「硬貨」と言い換えることができます。

「硬貨」は、"effect" を意味する「効果」と同音です。

また、日本の硬貨で最も金額が大きいのは、「五百円玉」です。

すなわち、それ以上大きな硬貨(効果)はない、というわけです。
No. 1 David's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
I'm sorry for the late reply.

Unlucky Coins Part 1

Oct 13, 2019 23:25
Unlucky Coins Part 1

Yesterday, I introduced 'goen-dama' (五円玉 - "five-yen coin") as a popular offertory coin.

On the other hand, there are two unpopular coins as offertory money -- they are 'jūen-dama' (十円玉 - "ten-yen coin") and 'gohyakuen-dama' (五百円玉 - "five-hundred-yen coin").

The kanji character 十 of 十円玉 can also be read as 'tō' (とお).

'Tō' can be written as 遠, which means "distance."

In addition, 'en' (円) has the same sound as 縁, which means "relationship."

That is to say, 十円 implies the unlucky term 'tōen' (遠縁), which means "distance relationship."
縁起の悪いお賽銭 Part 1

昨日は、お賽銭に人気のある縁起の良い硬貨として、「五円玉」を紹介しました。

逆に、縁起の悪い硬貨として、「十円玉」と「五百円玉」があります。

「十円」の「十」は、「とお」と読むことができます。

「とお」は "distant" を意味する「遠」を表すことができます。

また、「円」は "relationship" を意味する「縁」と同音です。

すなわち「十円」は、「遠縁」("distant relationship") を暗に意味し、演技がよくないというわけです。

Five-yen Coin

Oct 13, 2019 22:31
Five-yen Coin

Usually, there is 'saisenbako' (賽銭箱) in Japanese shrines and temples.

'Saisen' (賽銭) means money that is dedicated when you pray for something to gods/Buddha, or when your prayer was fulfilled.

In addition, 'bako/hako' (箱) means "box," so 'saisenbako' means an offertory box.

The most popular coin to put in there is 'goen-dama' (五円玉 - "five-yen coin").

This is because 'goen' (五円 - "five-yen") has the same sound as 'goen' (ご縁), which means "relationship."

People devote a five-yen coin in hopes of having a good encounter.
五円玉

日本の神社や寺院などには「賽銭箱」が置かれていることがあります。

「賽銭」は、神仏に何かを祈願する際、もしくは祈願成就のお礼参りの際に奉納する金銭のことです。

また、「箱」は "box" を意味するので、「賽銭箱」はその金銭を入れる箱というわけです。

この賽銭箱に入れる金額としては、「五円玉」が人気です。

「五円」は ”relationship” を意味する「ご縁」と同音であるからです。

人々は「ご縁がありますように」と心のなかで願いながら、五円玉を奉納するというわけです。

En mo Yukari mo Nai (縁もゆかりもない - Complete Stranger)

Oct 9, 2019 20:32
En mo Yukari mo Nai

When describing that there is no relationship between things or people, you can say 'en mo yukari mo nai' (縁もゆかりもない) in Japanese.

Both 'en' (縁) and 'yukari' (ゆかり) means relationships between family members, friends, or things.

In fact, 'yukari' can be written in kanji as 縁 or 所縁 -- this kanji character is the same as 'en'.

In addition, 'nai' (ない) in a negative word.

That is to say, this phrase emphasizes the lack of relationships by repeating similar terms.
縁もゆかりもない

物事の間にまったく繋がりがないことを、「縁もゆかりもない」と言います。

「縁」と「ゆかり」は、どちらも家族や友人、物事との間の関係を意味する言葉です。

実際、「ゆかり」は漢字では「縁」もしくは「所縁」と書き、「縁(えん)」と同じ字を使います。

また、「ない」は否定語です。

すなわちこの言葉は、似たような言葉を繰り返して、繋がりの無さを強調しているというわけです。
No. 1 rdean's correction
Great job!
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)

I actually just heard this phrase used on TV the other night. It's interesting how they use two different readings of the kanji in this way
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
Actually, I chose this topic because I heard it on TV the other day, haha.

haha, I thought that might have been the case. It was the story about the baby who got stuck in a hole right?

Ato no Matsuri (後の祭り - Too Late) Part 2

Oct 8, 2019 13:41
Ato no Matsuri Part 2

Yesterday, I introduced the Japanese phrase 'ato no matsuri' (後の祭り), which means a situation where something is too late, and explained a theory about its etymology.

The other accepted theory about the etymology is related to the deceased.

In Japan, when a person dies, people will hold some events called 'sōshiki' (葬式 - "funeral") and 'hōji' (法事 - "Buddhist memorial service").

This theory compared these events with 'matsuri' (祭り - "festival") and says that it is too late to hold such festivals for the deceased.
後の祭り Part 2

昨日は、何かが手遅れであることを意味する「後の祭り」という表現と、語源に関する一つの説を紹介しました。

もう一つの有力な説は、「故人」に関するものです。

日本では人が亡くなると、多くの場合、葬式や法事といった行事が行われます。

これら行事を「祭り」に見立て、故人に対して仰々しく祭りを行っても手遅れである、ということを言っているわけです。
No. 1 David's correction
Good as always. I can't think of another way to say the same thing.
Toru
Thank you for reading my entry! (^^)

Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)

Ato no Matsuri (後の祭り - Too Late) Part 1

Oct 7, 2019 18:51
Ato no Matsuri Part 1

I often get into a situation called 'ato no matsuri' (後の祭り).

Since 'ato' (後) means "latter" and 'matsuri' (祭り) means "festival," the literal meaning of 'ato no matsuri' is "latter festival," but it actually means a situation where something is too late.

There are two major theories about its etymology.

One theory says that it comes from the Gion Festival in Kyoto.

The Gion Festival takes place throughout a month, and it consists of two parts: 'Saki-matsuri' (前祭 - "Pre-Festival") and 'Ato-matsuri' (後祭 - "Post-Festival").

Since the 'Ato-matsuri' is relatively low-key, it came to mean "too late" or "let a chance go by."
後の祭り Part 1

私はよく「後の祭り」と呼ばれる状況になります。

「後」は "latter"、「祭り」は "festival" を意味するので、「後の祭り」の文字どおりの意味は "festival" ですが、実際には「時機を逸して何かが手遅れになること」を意味します。

この言葉の語源には大きく二つの説があります。

一つは、京都の祇園祭から来ているという説です。

祇園祭は1ヶ月かけて行われる大きな祭りで、「前祭」と「後祭」の二部構成になっています。

しかしながら「後祭」は比較的地味であるため、「時機を逃した」や「手遅れ」の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Fraumeow's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
Actually, the Japanese word 'ato' (後) can mean both "latter" and "later." Here, I wanted to say something like "festival held in the second half."

Shirokuro Tsukeru (白黒つける - Determining Clearly)

Oct 7, 2019 17:32
Shirokuro Tsukeru

Sometimes you will have a situation where you need to determine whether something is right or wrong, good or bad.

Determining such a thing is expressed as 'shirokuro tsukeru' (白黒つける) in Japanese.

'Shiro' (白) means "white," 'kuro' (黒) means "black," and 'tsukeru' means "determine," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "to determine whether something is white or black."

It is said that this phrase comes from "Go" (a board game using white and black stones).

Since "Go" determines whether the winner is white side or black side, 'shirokuro tsukeru' came to mean to make a clear conclusion.
白黒つける

時には、物事の善し悪しや是非を、はっきりと示す必要があると思います。

そのようなことを日本語で「白黒つける」と言います。

「白」は "white"、「黒」は "black"、「つける」は "determine " を意味するので、「白黒つける」の文字どおりの意味は "to determine whether something is white or black" となります。

この表現は、囲碁から派生したと言われています。

囲碁で「白の勝ち」か「黒の勝ち」か決着をつけることから、「白黒つける」は物事の明確な結論を下す意味になったというわけです。
No. 1 David's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Aku wa Nobeyo (悪は延べよ)

Oct 7, 2019 08:52
Aku wa Nobeyo

Yesterday, I introduced the proverb 'zen wa isoge' (善は急げ),

Actually, this proverb has an additional part -- it is 'aku wa nobeyo' (悪は延べよ).

(Usually, the latter part is omitted.)

Since 'aku' (悪) means "bad" and 'nobeyo' (延べよ) means "postpone," the literal meaning of 'aku wa nobeyo' is "postpone bad things."

In other words, this proverb says that if you think it is bad, you should postpone doing it as much as possible.

If you postpone doing the bad thing, sometime you may come less need to do it.
悪は延べよ

昨日は、良いと思うことはすぐに実行すべきであることを意味する「善は急げ」ということわざを紹介しました。

実は、このことわざには「悪は延べよ」という続きがあります。

(大抵、後半は省略されます。)

「悪」は "bad"、「延べよ」は "postpone " を意味するので、「悪は延べよ」の文字どおりの意味は "postpone bad things" です。

すなわち、「悪いと思うことは、できるだけ延期せよ」と言っているわけです。

延期すれば、いつかそれを行わなくて済むようになるかもしれません。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Interesting. Sounds like a useful phrase ^^
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
Yes, it may be a useful phrase, but fewer Japanese use it compared with 善は急げ.

Zen wa Isoge (善は急げ - Now is the Time for Action)

Oct 5, 2019 20:04
Zen wa Isoge

I sometimes remind myself of the Japanese proverb 'zen wa isoge' (善は急げ).

Since 'zen' (善) means "good/virtue" and 'isoge' (急げ) means "hasten/hurry," the literal meaning of 'zen wa isoge' is "hasten to do good things."

In other words, this proverb says that if you think it is a good thing, you should do it immediately without hesitation.

However, unplanned and imprudent actions can cause a bad result, so you should also have some caution.

It can be translated into English as "Now is the time for action."
善は急げ

私はときどき「善は急げ」ということわざを自分に言い聞かせます。

「善」は "good/virtue"、「急げ」は "hasten/hurry" を意味するので、「善は急げ」の文字どおりの意味は "hasten to do good things." になります。

すなわち、「良いと思ったことならば、ためらわずすぐに実行するべきだ」ということを言っているわけです。

ただ、無計画に慌てて行動しては失敗してしまうかもしれないので、気をつけなければいけません。

英語では "Now is the time for action" のように言うことができます。
No. 1 Mac's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

I thought that the Japanese sentence 'warui kekka wo maneku' (悪い結果を引き起こす).
Here, 'warui' (悪い) means "bad," 'kekka' (結果) means "result/outcome/consequence," and 'hikiokosu' (引き起こす) means "cause/deliver/produce/lead to."

I just chose the most common translation for each word from that, but such thoughtless behavior seems to lead to bad outcomes.

I like how you used the word outcome instead of results in your reply. It made me smile :P You're learning quickly.

Kenmin no Hi (県民の日 - "Prefecture Citizens Day")

Oct 4, 2019 18:22
Kenmin no Hi

Yesterday, I introduced 'Tomin no Hi' (都民の日 - "Tokyo Citizens Day"), which was established for Tokyo citizens.

In addition to Tokyo, 20 out of 46 prefectures have established the regional anniversary as 'Kenmin no Hi' (県民の日 - "Prefecture Citizens Day").

Usually, the day when the prefecture or its name was borne is defined as 'Kenmin no Hi'.

However, except for Tokyo, only five prefectures (Chiba, Gunma, Ibaraki, Saitama, and Yamanashi) close most elementary, junior high, and high schools on that day.

Incidentally, in Aichi where I grew up, there was no such a day.
県民の日

昨日は、東京都民のために制定された「都民の日」を紹介しました。

東京都以外にも、46道府県のうち20の県が「県民の日」としてその地域の記念日を制定しています。

その県もしくは県名が誕生した日が、県民の日となることが多いようです。

しかし、その中で小中高を休校としているのは、「千葉県」「群馬県」「茨城県」「埼玉県」「山梨県」のたったの5県です。

私の育った愛知県では、そもそも「県民の日」がありませんでした。
No. 1 nottheauthor's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Tomin no Hi (都民の日 - Tokyo Citizens Day)

Oct 2, 2019 20:43
Tomin no Hi

October 1st was 'Tomin no Hi' (都民の日).

Since 'to' (都) means "Tokyo," 'min' (民) means "people/citizens," and 'hi' (日) means "day," the literal meaning of 'tomin no hi' is "Tokyo Citizens Day."

'Tomin no hi' was established by Tokyo in 1952, and most elementary schools, junior high schools, and high schools in Tokyo are closed on this day.

I had no idea about this day until recently, because I started living in Tokyo after graduating from my university.

I heard that many facilities in Tokyo, such as Tokyo Sky Tree, zoos and aquariums, are free to enter on this day.
都民の日

10月1日は「都民の日」でした。

「都」は "Tokyo"、「民」は "people/residents"、「日」は "day" を意味するので、「都民の日」の文字どおりの意味は "Tokyo Residents Day" です。

都民の日は東京都が1952年に制定した記念日であり、東京都の小中高校は休校となるようです。

私は東京に住むようになったのは大学卒業後なので、このような日があることは最近まで知りませんでした。

都民の日には、東京スカイツリーや動物園、水族館など東京都にあるさまざまな施設の利用が無料になるようです。
No. 1 Mac's correction
All your sentences are great!
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)

Good! :)
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

10% Consumption Tax

Oct 2, 2019 20:13
10% Consumption Tax

On October 1, 2019, the consumption tax in Japan was raised from 8% to 10%.

Originally, the rising tax to 10% was scheduled to be implemented in 2015, but it was postponed twice, and it was finally raised this year.

There are pros and cons to this raising consumption tax, but I do not care really much.

Because the consumption tax related food and drink are out of the tax increase -- I mainly spend money on them in my current life.

According to TV news, many people bought large home appliances such as refrigerators and washing machines before the consumption tax increased.
消費税10%

10月1日、日本で消費税が8%から10%に引き上げられました。

もともとは2015年に10%になる予定でしたが、二度にわたり先送りされ、今回ようやく10%になりました。

増税に関しては賛否両論ありますが、私はどちらでもよいと感じています。

なぜならば、現在の私の主要な消費である飲食料品は、増税の対象外だからです。

増税前には、冷蔵庫や洗濯機などの大型家電を買おうとする人が多くみられたようです。
No. 1 Mac's correction
I saw this on NHK! Why was it delayed?
Toru
Thank you for the correction!

> I saw this on NHK! Why was it delayed?
I'm not sure about that, but it is said that the main factor is the economic downturn after the previous tax increase in 2014.

Hito no Furi mite Wa-ga Furi Naose (人の振り見て我が振り直せ)

Oct 1, 2019 15:06
Hito no Furi mite Wa-ga Furi Naose

The day before yesterday, I introduced the idiom 'hanmen kyōshi' (反面教師), which comes from China and means a negative exemplar.

There is a Japanese proverb that has a similar meaning to this -- it is 'hito no furi mite wa-ga furi naose' (人の振り見て我が振り直せ).

Since 'hito' (人) means "person," 'furi' (振り) means "behavior," ''mite' (見て) means "look," wa-ga' (我が) means "my," and 'naose' (直せ) means "fix," the literal meaning of this proverb is "Fix your behavior by looking other's behavior."

I think there is no need to explain the etymology.

It just says that you should learn what to do and what not to do from other's behavior.
人の振り見て我が振り直せ

二日前、中国の慣用句に由来する「反面教師」という言葉を紹介しました。

「反面教師」とよく似た日本のことわざに、「人の振り見て我が振り直せ」があります。

「人」は "person"、「振り」は "behavior"、「見て」は "look"、「我が」は "my"、「直せ」は "fix" を意味するので、このことわざの文字どおりの意味は "" となります。

特に説明は不要だと思います。

他人の行動を見て、良いところは見習い、悪いところは改めよということを言っているわけです。
No. 1 ジョシュ's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Kakukaku Shikazika (かくかくしかじか)

Oct 1, 2019 13:47
Kakukaku Shikazika

When you feel tired of explaining something concretely, you can say 'kakukaku shikazika' (かくかくしかじか).

Actually, its etymology has not been cleared, but 'kaku' (かく) and 'shika/zika' (しか/じか) can be written in kanji as 斯く and 然, respectively.

Both 斯く and 然, mean "such," that is, you can avoid concrete expressions or explanations by using these terms.

Because of this, it is thought that the expression 'kakukaku shikazika' came to be used when avoiding concrete expressions, explanations or descriptions.
かくかくしかじか

何かを具体的に説明するのが面倒なとき、「かくかくしかじか」と言うことができます。

語源についてははっきりしていませんが、「かく」と「しか」はそれぞれ漢字で「斯く」「然」と書くことができます。

「斯く」と「然」は、いずれも「このような」「そのような」といった意味で、具体的表現を省略する語です。

このため、これらを繰り返した「かくかくしかじか」は、説明を省略する際に利用されるようになったと考えられます。
No. 1 ebh's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Hanmen Kyōshi (反面教師 - A Negative Exemplar)

Sep 30, 2019 08:54
Hanmen Kyōshi

There are many people and things that can be described as 'hanmen kyōshi' (反面教師) in the world.

(It is difficult to notice for myself, but I might become that.)

'Hanmen' (反面) means "other side" and 'kyōshi' (教師) means "teacher," so the literal meaning of 'hanmen kyōshi' is "the other side teacher."

Actually, it means a bad example that can be a material for reflection.

This four-character idiom was created by a leader of the Chinese Communist Party, Mao Zedong, and it was used for the first time in his speech in 1957.
反面教師

世の中は「反面教師」となる人や物事であふれています。

(私自身がそうかもしれません。)

「反面」は "other side"、「教師」は "teacher" を意味するので、「反面教師」の文字どおりの意味は "the other side teacher" です。

実際には、悪い見本として反省の材料となる人や物事のことを表します。

この四字熟語は、中国共産党の指導者、毛沢東によって発案され、1957年に行われた演説で初めて使われたようです。
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
Interesting post.
I came across a 反面教師 just yesterday. And she is literally a sort of 教師 ^^;
Toru
Thank you for the comment. :)
It's ironic, haha.

Wow, I didn't realize Mao invented that phrase. Ironic, cause he's a bit of a 反面教師 himself haha
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
> Think this is what you meant?
Yes, it's exactly what I wanted to say. :)

> Ironic, cause he's a bit of a 反面教師 himself haha
Such a case can be described as ブーメラン (boomerang) in Japan, haha.

Neguse (寝癖 - Bed Hair)

Sep 27, 2019 18:06
Neguse

Somehow I often have a 'neguse' (寝癖).

Since 'ne' (寝) means "sleep" and 'kuse' (癖) usually means "habit," the literal meaning of 'neguse' is "sleeping habit."

Here, 'kuse' is also used for hair, and in which case, it means "bent hair."

If you say 'kuse no aru kami' (癖のある髪 - "hair having 'kuse' "), it means "wavy hair."

Commonly, the term 'neguse' also implies one's hair (after sleeping) -- it can be translated into English as "bed hair."

Sometimes my hair looks like it exploded when I wake up.
寝癖

私はよく「寝癖」がつきます。

「寝」は "sleep"、「癖」は "habit" を意味するので、「寝癖」の文字どおりの意味は "sleeping habit" になります。

ここで「癖」は、髪の毛に対して使われることもあり、その場合は「折れたり曲がったりした状態」を表します。

「癖のある髪」と言うと、"wavy hair" のような意味になります。

実は「寝癖」という言葉も髪の毛のことを意味しており、英語では "bed hair" と訳すことができます。

時々、私の髪の毛は爆発しています。
No. 1 Kento's correction
In Canada we call this, "bed head."
Toru
Thank you for letting me know!
I learned something new. :)

Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Umi no Sachi, Yama no Sachi (海の幸と山の幸) Part 2

Sep 26, 2019 17:46
Umi no Sachi, Yama no Sachi Part 2

This entry is continuation of yesterday's post.

Yesterday, I introduced 'umi no sachi' (海の幸), meaning "sea produce," and 'yama no sachi' (山の幸), meaning "mountain harvest."

I explained that 'sachi' (幸) means "products/produce/harvest," but 'sachi' originally meant tools for catching fish or animals, such as fishhooks or arrows.

Later, it came to have the meaning of produce/harvest itself.

Incidentally, since the kanji 幸 often means "happiness," some people think that 'umi no sachi' and 'yama no sachi' are "gifts from the sea" and "gifts from mountains," respectively.
海の幸、山の幸 Part 2

今日は昨日の投稿の続きです。

昨日は、"sea produce" を意味する「海の幸」と "mountain harvest" を意味する「山の幸」を紹介しました。

「幸」は "products/produce/harvest" を意味すると説明しましたが、かつて「幸」は、漁猟などで獲物をとる道具(釣り針や弓矢)を意味していました。

そこから、漁猟などで得た獲物自体も表すようになったというわけです。

ちなみに、「幸」は "happiness" をよく意味することから、「海の幸」「山の幸」を「海からの贈り物」「山からの贈り物」のように考える人もいます。
No. 1 RPeregrino's correction
Perfect! Well done!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Umi no Sachi, Yama no Sachi (海の幸と山の幸) Part 1

Sep 25, 2019 09:40
Umi no Sachi, Yama no Sachi Part 1

Yesterday, I introduced some foods that are often eaten in fall/autumn in Japan.

In particular, something caught in the sea, such as saury, is called 'umi no sachi' (海の幸), and something caught in mountains, such as chestnuts or mushrooms, is called 'yama no sachi' (山の幸).

Since 'umi' (海) means "sea," 'yama' (山) means "mountain," and 'sachi' (幸) means "products," the literal meaning of 'umi no sachi' and 'yama no sachi' are "sea products" and "mountain products," respectively.

To be continued.
海の幸、山の幸 Part 1

昨日は秋によく食される幾つかの食材を紹介しました。

その中でも、サンマなどの海で捕れるものは「海の幸」、栗や松茸など山で採れるものは「山の幸」と称されることがあります。

「海」は "sea"、「山」は "mountain"、「幸」は "products" を意味するので、「海の幸」と「山の幸」の文字どおりの意味は "sea products" と "mountain products" になります。

続く
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

My pleasure

Aki no Mikaku (秋の味覚 - Seasonal Food of Fall/Autumn)

Sep 24, 2019 13:07
Aki no Mikaku

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'sanma' (サンマ), which means "Pacific saury."

In Japan, 'sanma' is one of the most typical 'aki no mikaku' (秋の味覚).

Since 'aki' (秋) means "fall/autumn" and 'mikaku' (味覚) means "flavor," the literal meaning of 'aki no mikaku' is "fall/autumn flavors."

In addition to 'sanma', 'kuri' (栗 - "chestnut"), 'matsutake' (松茸 - "matsutake mushroom"), 'satsumaimo' (サツマイモ - "sweet potate"), and 'nashi' (梨 - "pear") are often lined up as seasonal food of fall/autumn.
秋の味覚

昨日は「サンマ」という言葉を紹介しました。

サンマは、代表的な「秋の味覚」です。

「秋」は "fall/autumn"、「味覚」は "flavor" を意味するので、「秋の味覚」は fall/autumn flavors"" という意味になります。

サンマの他には、「栗」や「松茸」、「サツマイモ」、「梨」などがよく秋の味覚として挙げられます。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
yum!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Sanma (サンマ - "Pacific Saury")

Sep 23, 2019 22:19
Sanma

The season when 'sanma' (サンマ) becomes delicious is approaching.

'Sanma' means "Pacific saury," and is sold throughout the year, but you can eat delicious saury with a lot of fat in the fishing season, autumn.

'Sanma' is written in kanji as 秋刀魚, because it is fish (魚) that looks like a sword (刀), and is caught in autumn (秋),

Unfortunately, this year the price of 'sanma' has extremely increased due to the poor catch.

A few years ago 'sanma' was around 100 yen each, whereas it is around 300-400 yen each now.
サンマ

「サンマ」が美味しい季節になってきました。

"Pacific saury" を意味する「サンマ」は、一年中販売されていますが、漁獲シーズンの秋は特に脂の乗った美味しいサンマを食べることができます。

漢字では「秋」にとれる「刀」のような見た目の「魚」であることから、「秋刀魚」と書きます。

しかし、今年は不漁のため、サンマの価格が高騰しています。

数年前は1尾100円前後でしたが、今は300~400円ほどします。
No. 1 knghcm's correction

Very good effort indeed! Very interesting article about 'sanma'.

DRAGON QUEST WALK

Sep 22, 2019 19:25
DRAGON QUEST WALK

On September 12th, SQUARE ENIX released a smartphone app, "DRAGON QUEST WALK" in Japan.

This game uses GPS location information like "Pokémon GO," and the purpose is to move to destinations or to fight against monsters.

It has already become a social phenomenon -- the number of downloads has exceeded five million only in one week.

Unfortunately, I feel that the number of smartphone zombies has also increased.

Incidentally, anywhere displayed on GoogleMap can be set as a destination of this game.

Several days ago, a screenshot that showed a gang office as the destination was uploaded on Twitter -- this fact caused controversy.
ドラゴンクエストウォーク

9月12日、日本でスクウェア・エニックスより「ドラゴンクエストウォーク」が配信されました。

このゲームは「ポケモンGO」と同様、GPSの位置情報を利用したゲームとなっており、モンスターと戦ったり目的地まで移動することで物語を進めるというものです。

配信から一週間で500万ダウンロードを突破し、既に社会現象となっています。

残念ながら、「歩きスマホ」をする人の数も増えたように感じます。

ちなみに、GoogleMapに表示される場所であればどこでも目的地の候補になり得ます。

先日、暴力団の事務所が目的地になっている画像がTwitterにアップロードされ、話題になりました。
No. 1 Kulturbeutel's correction

I want to fight slimes in a soapland.
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
Haha, it's a naughty fight.

Tsuki (月 - Moon)

Sep 21, 2019 16:26
Tsuki

I like to see 'tsuki' (月).

'Tsuki' (月) means "moon," and there are several theories about its etymology.

One theory says that it comes from the term 'tsugi' (次ぎ), which means "next," because the moon is bright next to the sun.

Another theory says that it comes from 'tsuki/tsuki-ru' (尽き/尽きる), which means "run out," because the brightness of the moon runs out once a month.

Incidentally, it was announced that the game "Moon" for PlayStation released in 1997 will be distributed on Switch next month, then it has become a hot topic in Japan.


私は「月」を見るのが好きです。

「月」は "moon" を意味する単語で、語源は諸説あります。

ある説では、月は太陽の次に明るく輝くことから "next" を意味する「次ぎ」に由来するとしています。

またある説では、月に一度その輝きが尽きることから、"run out" を意味する「尽き(る)」に由来するとしています。

ちなみに先日、1997年発売のプレイステーション用のゲーム「Moon」がSwitchで配信されることが発表され、話題になりました。
No. 1 仮名's correction
Those are some interesting theories. I like the 次 one the most.
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
> Do you mean the moon is bright because of the sun's light?
Sorry, I wanted to mean that the brightness of the moon is the second largest (the brightest one is the sun).

Ah, I see.
"because the moon is second only to the sun in brightness."
I know this sentence is a bit complicated, but I think it sounds the best.
Toru
Thank you for the suggestion!
I learned something new. :)

A Difficult Riddle

Sep 20, 2019 11:10
A Difficult Riddle

Today I will give you a little difficult 'nazonazo' (なぞなぞ - Riddle).

Q: 'Tanaka-san, Yamaguchi-san, Etō-sam, warau to chichioya ni naru no wa dare?' (田中さん、山口さん、江藤さん、笑うと父親になるのは誰? - "Who will become a father when he laughs: Tanaka-san, Yamaguchi-san, or Etō-san?")

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

The answer to this riddle is 'Etō-san' (江藤さん - "Mr. Etō").

'Warau' (笑う - "laughing") can be rephrased as 'egao ni naru' (笑顔になる - "becoming a smile").

In addition, 'egao ni naru' (えがおになる) can be regarded as " 'e' becomes 'o' ," and if 'e' of 'Etō-san' becomes 'o', he will become 'otō-san' (お父さん - "father").
難しいなぞなぞ

今日は、少し難しいなぞなぞを紹介します。

Q: 田中さん、山口さん、江藤さん、笑うと父親になるのは誰?

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

答えは「江藤さん」です。

「笑う」は「笑顔になる」と言い換えられます。

「えがおになる」、すなわち「江藤さん」の「え」が「お」になると、「おとうさん(お父さん)」になるというわけです。
No. 1 英貴 's correction
Really interesting! Thank you for sharing :)
Toru
Thank you for the comment! (^^)

Interesting Riddles Part 3

Sep 19, 2019 10:58
Interesting Riddles Part 3

Today I will give you two interesting Japanese 'nazonazo' (なぞなぞ - "Riddle").

Q1: 'Machigai darake no mēru wa nanji ni todoku?' (間違いだらけのメールは何時に届く? - "What time does a corrupt e-mail arrive?")

Q2: 'Sekai no chūshin ni iru mushi wa?' (世界の中心にいる虫は? - "What a kind of insect that is at the center of the world?")

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

The answer to Q1 is 'goji' (5時 - "5 o'clock").

Because 'goji' can be written in kanji as 誤字, which means "typo."

The answer to Q2 is 'ka' (蚊 - "mosquito").

Because the central character of 'sekai' (世界/せかい - "world") is 'ka' (か - "mosquito").
面白いなぞなぞ Part 3

今日は二つのなぞなぞを出します。

Q1: 間違いだらけのメールは何時に届く?

Q2: 世界の中心にいる虫は?

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Q1の答えは「5時」です。

「ごじ」は「誤字」と書くことができるからです。

Q2の答えは「蚊」です。

「世界(せかい)」の中心の文字は「か」だからです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Fun!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Interesting Riddles Part 2

Sep 18, 2019 19:56
Interesting Riddles Part 2

Today I will give you two famous/interesting Japanese 'nazonazo' (なぞなぞ - "Riddle").

Q1: 'Hikkuri-kaeru to karuku naru dōbutsu wa?' (ひっくり返ると軽くなる動物は? - "What is a kind of animal that becomes lighter when turning upside down?").

Q2: 'Kuroi inu to shiroi inu, docchi ga shizuka?' (黒い犬と白い犬、どっちが静か? - "There are a black dog and white dog. Which is quieter?")

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

The answer to Q1 is 'iruka' (イルカ - "dolphin").

Because the reverse reading of it is 'karui' (カルイ/軽い), which means "light."

The answer to Q2 is 'kuroi inu' (黒い犬 - "black dog").

Because you can make the kanji 黙 (meaning "silent/silence") by combining 黒 (meaning "black") and 犬 (meaning "dog").
面白いなぞなぞ Part 2

今日は、二つのなぞなぞを出します。

Q1:ひっくり返ると軽くなる動物は?

Q2:黒い犬と白い犬、どっちが静か?

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Q1の答えは、イルカです。

イルカを逆から読むと「カルイ(軽い)」になるからです。

Q2の答えは、「黒い犬」です。

漢字の「黒」と「犬」を組み合わせると、「黙」という漢字になるからです。
No. 1 クローバー木's correction
* - * These are so interesting.
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Glad to be of service. :D

干せば、干すほど濡れる物はなんせしょう?(謎々)
解:タオル
Toru
面白そうななぞなぞに聞こえますが、私にはちょっと理解できませんでした。
タオルを干したら乾くと思うのですが、どういうことでしょうか?

Toru
Thank you for the helpful comments! :)

I think in Japanese it will be natural when it is something like the following:
「静かなのはどっちでしょう?①黒い犬 ②白い犬」

Interesting Riddles Part 1

Sep 18, 2019 14:43
Interesting Riddles Part 1

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'nazonazo' (なぞなぞ), which means "riddle."

Next, I would like to introduce some interesting Japanese riddles.

Question: 'Kame to rakuda to sai ga kaimono ni ikimashita. Nani wo kau deshō?' (カメとラクダとサイが買い物に行きました。何を買うでしょう? - "A turtle, a camel, and a rhino went shopping. What would they buy?")

The answer is 'kamera' (カメラ - "camera").

By combining 'kame' (カメ - "turtle"), 'rakuda' (ラクダ - "camel"), and 'sai' (サイ - "rhino"), it becomes 'kamera kudasai' (カメラ下さい - "Please give me a camera").
面白いなぞなぞ Part 1

昨日は「なぞなぞ」という言葉を紹介しました。

次は、面白いなぞなぞを幾つか紹介していきたいと思います。

問題「カメとラクダとサイが買い物に行きました。何を買うでしょう?」

答えは「カメラ」です。

カメとラクダとサイを繋げて言うと、「カメラ下さい」になるというわけです。
No. 1 bennatan's correction
A big moron and a little moron were standing on the edge of a cliff. The big moron fell over but the little moron did not. Why not?
Toru
Mmmmmm, it is difficult for me!

A little bit more on the edge?

Yes, he was a little "more-on".
Toru
Oh, now I understand! :)

Nazonazo (なぞなぞ - Riddle)

Sep 17, 2019 16:05
Nazonazo

When I was a child, I liked 'nazonazo' (なぞなぞ).

'Nazonazo' is a kind of games that someone says a problem statement including a hidden meaning and others try to guess that -- it is often translated into English as "riddle."

'Nazo' (なぞ/謎) means "mystery" or "enigma," and the term 'nazonazo' was borne by repeating it.

I think that the most famous 'nazonazo' in Japan is:

'Pan wa pan demo taberare-nai pan wa?' (パンはパンでも食べられないパンは? - "What kind of bread you can't eat?")

The classic answer is 'furai-pan' (フライパン - "frying pan").

Note that "bread" and "frying pan" are 'pan' (パン) and 'furai-pan' (フライパン) in Japanese, respectively.
なぞなぞ

私は子どもの頃、「なぞなぞ」が好きでした。

「なぞなぞ」とは、言葉や文章の中にある意味を隠して問いかけ、その意味を当てる遊びのことで、英語ではよく "riddle" と訳されます。

「なぞ/謎」は "mystery" や "enigma" を意味する言葉で、これを繰り返すことで「なぞなぞ」という言葉が生まれました。

日本で最も有名ななぞなぞは、以下のものだと思います。

「パンはパンでも食べられないパンは?」

定番の答えは「フライパン」です。

「フライパン」は英語で "frying pan" ですが、「パン」は英語で "bread" である点に気をつけてください。
No. 1 bennatan's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Ichihayaku (いち早く - ASAP)

Sep 17, 2019 15:18
Ichihayaku

When describing you do something quickly before anyone else, you can use the Japanese expression 'ichihayaku' (いち早く).

People often think that 'Ichi' (いち) can be written in kanji as 一, which means "one," but actually it is written as 逸, which means "remarkable" or "extraordinary."

In addition, 'hayaku' (早く) means "fast" or "quick."

That is to say, 'ichihayaku' means "extraordinarily fast/quick" or "ASAP."

For example, you can say 'kare wa ichihayaku kitaku shita' (彼はいち早く帰宅した - "He went home before anyone else").
いち早く

他の人よりも早く、真っ先に何かをするとき、「いち早く」という表現を使うことがあります。

「いち」は "one" を意味する「一」であると思われがちですが、実際には "remarkable" や "extraordinary" を意味する「逸」です。

また、「早く」は "fast" や "quick" を意味します。

すなわち「いち早く」は、"extraordinarily fast/quick" や "ASAP" のような意味になります。

例えば、「彼はいち早く帰宅した」のように使います。
No. 1 vqdat169@gmail.com's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

Atarimaeda no Kurakkā (あたり前田のクラッカー)

Sep 14, 2019 11:43
Atarimaeda no Kurakkā

Two days ago, I introduced the term 'atarimae' (当たり前), which means "of course" or "natural(ly)."

There is a famous old pun that uses 'atarimae' -- it is 'atarimaeda no kurakkā' (あたり前田のクラッカー).

This pun became popular due to a TV commercial that was broadcast in the 1960s by a Japanese confectionery company named Maeda Seika, which specializes in crackers and biscuits.

It was made by just connecting 'atarimae' and 'Maeda no kurakkā' (前田のクラッカー - "Maeda's Cracker") -- it has no profound meaning.

In the past, many people said 'atarimaeda no kurakkā' instead of saying 'atarimae'.
あたり前田のクラッカー

二日前、私は "of corse" を意味する「当たり前」という言葉を紹介しました。

「当たり前」を使った有名な古いダジャレに、「あたり前田のクラッカー」があります。

このダジャレは、日本の前田製菓というクラッカー・ビスケット専門の製菓会社が1960年代に放送したテレビCMで使われ、流行しました。

「当たり前」と「前田のクラッカー」を繋げただけで、深い意味はありません。

一時期、「当たり前」と言う代わりに「あたり前田のクラッカー」と言うのが流行ったというわけです。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
Perfect!

Incidentally, there's a type of cookie called Lorna Doone, so I remember people saying "How are ya Doone (doing), Lorna?" It doesn't mean anything, it's just a silly gag!

From what I can see, 当たり前クラッカーis a 死語 like 冗談よし子ちゃん
Toru
Thank you for reading my post and for letting me know the interesting phrase!
> From what I can see, 当たり前クラッカーis a 死語 like 冗談よし子ちゃん
Haha, both are exactly 死語.

Kubi no Kawa Ichimai de Tsunagaru (首の皮一枚で繋がる - Hanging by a Thread)

Sep 13, 2019 20:54
Kubi no Kawa Ichimai de Tsunagaru

Today I would like to introduce a phrase that describes my current situation.

It is 'kubi no kawa ichimai de tsunagaru' (首の皮一枚で繋がる).

Since 'kubi' (首) means "neck," 'kawa' (皮) means "skin," "ichimai" (一枚) means "one layer," and 'tsunagaru' (繋がる) means "to connect," the literal meaning of this phrase is "one's neck is connected only with one layer of the skin."

You may think that such a situation where one's head and body are connected only with the skin is already hopeless.

However, actually, this phrase is used to mean that something is not over yet or someone hangs by a thread.
首の皮一枚で繋がる

今日は、まさに私の今の状況を表すフレーズを紹介します。

それは「首の皮一枚で繋がる」です。

「首」は "neck"、「皮」は "skin"、「一枚」は "one layer"、「繋がる」は "to connect" を意味するので、このフレーズの文字どおりの意味は "one's neck is connected only with one layer of the skin" となります。

首が皮一枚で繋がっているような状況は、もう手遅れかもしれません。

しかし実際には、「わずかな望みが残っていること」や「ぎりぎりのところで持ちこたえること」を表します。
No. 1 KacieSensei's correction
Huh, I hadn't heard that one before! 勉強になりました。Thank you!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Nothing really needs corrected here.

All I can offer are other phrases that you may know that are similar to this one

"There's still ―" { hope / a glimmer of hope }
"All ― not lost " { is / hope is }
"He's holding on by the ―" { skin of his teeth }"

I'm glad you still have hope to get out of your situation. Don't give up!
(^^)b

oh, btw ( by the way ) that's a new phrase for me too!
Thanks for the entry! (^^/
Toru
Thank you for the correction and your kind comment! (^^)
I learned something new. :)

Atarimae (当たり前 - Of Course) Part 2

Sep 12, 2019 14:52
Atariame Part 2

This entry is a continuation of yesterday's post.

The other theory of 'atarimae' (当たり前 - "of course/natural/obvious") is that it comes from the phonetic equivalent.

Since 当 and 前 can be read as 'tō' and 'zen', respectively, the combination 当前 can be read as 'tōzen', and the phonetic equivalent term 'tōzen' (当然) means "of course" or "by rights."

By using Japanese readings for 当前, the term 'atarimae' (当たり前) was borne.

Incidentally, please be careful when you use 'atarimae', because it is often used sarcastically.
当たり前 Part 2

今日は昨日の投稿の続きです。

わかりきっていることや、当然なことを意味する「当たり前」の語源に関するもう一つの説は、当て字から来ているというものです。

「前」は「ぜん」と読むことができるため、「当前」と書いて "" を意味する「当然」と同じ読みを持たせることができます。

そして「当前」を訓読みすることで、「当たり前」になったというわけです。

「当たり前」は、皮肉を込めて用いられることが多いので、使う際は注意して下さい。
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction

Atarimae (当たり前 - No Wonder) Part 1

Sep 11, 2019 17:38
Atarimae Part 1

When referring to something obvious or what everybody knows, you can use the Japanese term 'atarimae' (当たり前).

There are two major theories about the etymology.

The first theory is that it comes from the terminology used by fishermen and farmers.

When dividing the fish or crops, they called the divided parts for others 'wakemae' (分け前), and called the divided part for oneself 'torimae' (取り前).

Also, the divided part per person was called 'atarimae' (当たり前), because "per person" can be translated as 'hitori atari' (一人当たり) in Japanese.

Since receiving 'atarimae' is a legitimate right, it has come to the current meanings.
当たり前 Part 1

わかりきっていることや、当然なことを、「当たり前」と言うことがあります。

この言葉の語源には、大きく二つの説が存在します。

一つは、漁師や農家の人間が使っていた言葉が広まったという説です。

彼らは収穫物を分配する際に、人に渡す分を「分け前」、自分の取り分を「取り前」と言っていました。

そして、「一人当たり」の取り前のことを「当たり前」と言いました。

「当たり前」を受け取るのは当然の権利であることから、現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 tony's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

いいえ、どういたしまして。

Toru
> What do you mean when you say 'receiving atarimae' ?
Here, "receiving 'atarimae' " means to receive fish or crops that are divided for distribution.

あ。。なるほど。Thanks.

Uhauha (うはうは - Exhilarated)

Sep 10, 2019 13:24
Uhauha

When describing that someone is so happy and so excited, you can use the Japanese onomatopoeia 'uhauha' (うはうは).

This term became popular because of a TV commercial of curry broadcast in 1970.

In the TV commercial, a man said 'nyōbō mo uhauha yorokobu yo' (女房もウハウハ喜ぶよ), the literal meaning of this line is "my wife will also be happy with a feeling of 'uhauha'."

In other words, this commercial wanted to say that the product would make wives happy because curry is inexpensive, delicious, and easy to make.
うはうは

嬉しくて気持ちが高揚しているさまを、俗に「うはうは」と表現することがあります。

この言葉は、1970年に日本で放送されたカレーのテレビCMがきっかけで、流行しました。

このCMでは、「女房もウハウハ喜ぶよ」といったセリフがあります。

カレーは安く、簡単に美味しく作れることから、主婦にとって非常に喜ばしい商品であることをアピールしているというわけです。
No. 1 Aubrey's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Rōnyaku Nan-nyo (老若男女 - "Men and Women of All Ages")

Sep 9, 2019 17:03
Rōnyaku Nan-nyo

The four-character idiom 'rōnyaku nan-nyo' (老若男女) refers to men and women of all ages.

'Rō' (老) means "old," 'nyaku' (若) means "young," 'nan' (男) means "men" and 'nyo' (女) means "women."

That is to say, 'rōnakyu nan-nyo' literally means, everyone, young and old, men and women.

The idiom 男女 (meaning "men and women") is read as 'danjo', but its reading becomes 'nan-nyo' only in this four-character idiom.

Actually, I do not like this idiom very much, because I cannot speak it smoothly -- I will say 'rōnaku nyan-no' with a high probability.
老若男女

あらゆる層の人々を指す四字熟語に、「老若男女」があります。

「老」は "old"、「若」は "young"、「男」は "men"、「女」は "women" を意味します。

すなわち、「老若男女」は文字どおり、「老人も若者も、男性も女性も、すべての人々」を表しているというわけです。

「男女」だけだと「だんじょ」と読みますが、この四字熟語の中では「なんにょ」と読みます。

私は大抵「老若男女」を読む際に「ろうなくにゃんにょ」のように噛んでしまうので、この言葉はあまり好きではありません。
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
Toru
Thank you always for correcting me! :)
> 'rōnakyu nan-nyo'
I couldn't write this idiom smoothly even I used a keyboard, haha.

Always a pleasure.
> 'rōnakyu nan-nyo'
I couldn't write this idiom smoothly even I used a keyboard, haha.
>まったくだね(笑)

Internet Slang Terms for Expressing Laughing Part 2

Sep 9, 2019 16:26
Internet Slang Terms for Expressing Laughing Part 2

This entry is a continuation of yesterday's post.

The internet slang 「(笑)」, which express laughing, has undergone several changes.

For example, some people use 「w」 or 「草」 instead of 「(笑)」.

「w」 is short for 'warai/wara', which is the reading of 「笑」, and both have the same meaning.

If you want to express a loud laugh, you can use 「w」 repeatedly, just like 「wwww」.

Furthermore, since 「wwww」 looks like grass, some people came to use 「草」(which means "glass" and is read as 'kusa') to mean laughing.
笑いのインターネットスラング Part 2

昨日の投稿からの続きです。

笑いを表現するインターネットスラング「(笑)」は、幾つかの変化を遂げます。

例えば、「w」や「草」です。

「w」は、「笑」のローマ字表記 (warai/wara) を簡略化した表現で、「(笑)」と同じ意味を持ちます。

大きな笑いを表現する際には、「w」をつなげて「wwww」のように使います。

さらに、「w」を連ねると草のように見えることから、笑うことを「草」や「草生える」のように表現するようにもなりました。
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

My pleasure.

I like slang like ワロス and 草不可避ww

I've read that the use of w and wara for  笑 started from the net game Diablo, which didn't support kanji or kana entry.
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
And thank you for letting me know such an interesting fact!

Internet Slang Terms for Expressing Laughing Part 1

Sep 7, 2019 16:47
Internet Slang Terms for Expressing Laughing Part 1

On the internet, there are various slang terms that express laughing.

"Haha" and "lol (laugh out loud)" are often used in English, whereas 「(笑)」「w」, and「草」 are used in Japan.

「(笑)」 has been the most commonly used to express laughing on the internet, and the kanji 笑 (read as 'warai/wara') literally means "laugh."

I enclosed 笑 in parentheses in the above, but you can also write just 笑 without parentheses.

Note that it is not good to use 笑 (without parentheses) next to other kanji characters, because it is not easy to read and understand.

To be continued.
笑いのインターネットスラング Part 1

笑いを表現するネットスラングは、さまざま存在します。

英語には "haha" や "lol (laugh out loud)" がありますが、日本語では「(笑)」や「w」「草」などになります。

「(笑)」はネット上でもっともよく使われてきた笑いの表現で、文字どおり "laughing" を意味します。

上記では「笑」を括弧で囲っていますが、括弧を省略して書く人も多いです。

(ただし、漢字の隣に「笑」を書く場合は括弧無しだと読み辛いので、避けたほうが良いです。)

続く
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
Why is 草 used ?
Toru
I explained that in the following my post. :)
https://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/32826499266326019022638652554334017603

Great. Thanks.

Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)

Kaeru ga Naku kara Kaero (蛙が鳴くから帰ろ)

Sep 7, 2019 15:19
Kaeru ga Naku kara Kaero

One of the most famous traditional children's songs in Japan is 'kaeru ga naku kara kaero' (蛙が鳴くから帰ろ).

'Kaeru' (蛙) means "frog," 'naku' (鳴く) means "call/sing/croak," 'kara' (から) is a causal conjunction, and 'kaero' (帰ろ) means "(let's) go home."

That is to say, the literal meaning of this song is "let's go home because frogs are croaking."

Frogs are a nocturnal animal that begins to croak in the evening, so the sound can be a sign for the time that childrens go home.

In addition, this song is also a pun -- both 'kaeru' (蛙 - "frog") and 'kaeru' (帰る - "to go home") have the same sound.
蛙が鳴くから帰ろ

有名なわらべうたに、「蛙が鳴くから帰ろ」があります。

「蛙」は "frog"、「鳴く」は "call/sing/croak"、「から」は原因・理由を表す接続助詞、「帰ろ」は "(let's) go home" を意味します。

すなわち、この歌の文字どおりの意味は "let's go home because frogs are croaking" となります。

蛙は夜行性動物で、夜になると活発に鳴き始めるため、子どもが家に帰る時間の合図になり得るというわけです。

また、"frog" を意味する「蛙」と "to go home" を意味する「帰る」は同音であり、ダジャレにもなっています。
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

My pleasure

Nen-nen Korori (ねんねんころり)

Sep 5, 2019 22:56
Nen-nen Korori

I think that the most well-known traditional lullaby in Japan is 'Edo Komoriuta' (江戸子守唄 - "Edo Lullaby").

The lyrics are as follows:

'Nen-nen kororiyo okororiyo bōya wa yoiko da nen-ne shina' (ねんねんころりよ おころりよ ぼうやはよいこだ ねんねしな).

Here, 'Nen-nen/nen-ne' (ねんねん/ねんね) means "sleep," 'korori' (ころり) is an onomatopoeia expressing that something rolls, 'bōya' (ぼうや) means "boy," and 'yoiko' (よいこ) means "good child."

That is to say, this lullaby means "sleep, roll, roll (lie down), you are good boy, so sleep."

If you are interested in the melody of this lullaby, please check it on YouTube.
ねんねんころり

日本で最もよく知られた伝統的な子守唄は、「江戸子守唄」だと思います。

その歌詞は次のようなものです。

「ねんねんころりよ おころりよ ぼうやはよいこだ ねんねしな」

ここで「ねんねん/ねんね」は寝ること、「ころり」は何かが転がることを意味する擬態語、「ぼうや」は "boy"、「よいこ」は "good child" を意味します。

すなわち、この子守唄の意味は "sleep, roll, roll (lie down), you are good boy, so sleep" のようになります。

メロディが気になる人は、YouTube で調べてみてください。
No. 1 TheBlondeCupcake's correction
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)

Osaki ni Shitsurei Shimasu (お先に失礼します - Excuse Me for Leaving before You)

Sep 4, 2019 17:38
Osaki ni Shitsurei Shimasu

Today I would like to introduce a useful phrase that you can use when going home before your boss or colleagues leave.

It is 'osaki ni shitsurei shimasu' (お先に失礼します).

Since 'osaki' (お先) means "first/early," 'shitsurei' (失礼) means "rudeness," and 'shimasu' (します) is a polite expression of "do."

Here, 'osaki' implies that you go home (or do something) before someone.

That is to say, this phrase can be interpreted as "I am going to do a rude action of going home before you, please forgive me."
お先に失礼します

今日は、職場などで上司や同僚よりも先に帰るときに使えるフレーズを紹介します。

それは「お先に失礼します」です。

「お先」は "first/ahead"、「失礼」は "rudeness" を意味し、「します」は "do" の丁寧表現です。

ここで、「お先」は「先に帰ること(もしくは先に何かをすること)」を意味します。

すなわちこのフレーズは、「皆さまより先に帰るという礼儀に欠けた行為を行います(このような行為をどうかお許しください)」ということを表しているというわけです。
No. 1 Adam21's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

You are welcome. It was an interesting for me to read it!

Yamawake (山分け - Dividing Equally)

Sep 3, 2019 22:04
Yamawake

A few days ago, I introduced the term 'osusowake' (おすそわけ), which means to distribute goods or benefits that you received to your friends or others.

Another Japanese term, 'yamawake' (山分け), is a little similar to 'osusowake'.

Since 'yama' (山) means "mountain" and 'wake' (分け) means "to distribute/divide," the literal meaning of 'yamawake' is "to divide a mountain."

Actually, 'yamawake' means to divide something you obtained into two (equally) with someone.

It is said that this term comes from a small symmetrical mountain called Komezuka (米塚) in Kumamoto.

The Komezuka has a vertical crack in the center -- it looks like the mountain is divided into two.
山分け

数日前、人からもらったものを友人や知人に分け与えることを意味する「おすそわけ」という言葉を紹介しました。

「おすそわけ」と似た言葉に「山分け」があります。

「山」は "mountain"、「分け」は "to divide/distribute" を意味するので、「山分け」の文字どおりの意味は "to divide a mountain" となります。

実際には、「手に入れたものを誰かと半分(もしくは人数に合わせて等分)に分けること」を意味します。

この言葉は、熊本県にある米塚と呼ばれる均整のとれた小山に由来すると言われています。

この米塚には、山を二つに分けるように中央に亀裂が入っています。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
impressive
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

pretty much nothing to correct


Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)

Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

My pleasure.

Mawaranai Sushi (回らない寿司) Part 2

Sep 3, 2019 16:34
Mawaranai Sushi Part 2

This entry continues from yesterday's one.

The name of 'kaiten zushi' (回転寿司 - the literal meaning is "rotating sushi") was derived from the fact that sushis are placed on a conveyor and go around in the restaurant.

Restaurants of 'kaiten zushi' often serve sushi made with machines, so Japanese people usually have a cheap image of such restaurants.

Because of this, sushi made by sushi chefs are sometimes described as 'mawaranai sushi' (回らない寿司 - the literal meaning is "not rotating sushi"); in other words, it implies high-class sushi.

Incidentally, 'kaiten zushi' is translated into English as "conveyor belt sushi," "sushi-go-round" or "sushi train."
回らない寿司 Part 2

この投稿は、昨日の投稿の続きです。

「回転寿司」は、寿司がコンベアに乗せられて店内を回るため、このような名前がつけられました。

「回転寿司」の店は、寿司を機械で作っているところも多く、一般的に安価なイメージがあります。

このため、寿司職人が一貫ずつ握って提供する寿司のことを「回らない寿司」と表現することがあり、それは「高級寿司」であることを暗に意味しているというわけです。

ちなみに、「回転寿司」は英語で "conveyor belt sushi" や "sushi-go-round"、"sushi train" のように表現されます。
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

My pleasure.

Mawaranai Sushi (回らない寿司) Part 1

Sep 2, 2019 14:16
Mawaranai Sushi Part 1

September 1st was my birthday, so my friend and I did something special.

It is to go to eat 'mawaranai sushi' (回らない寿司).

Since 'mawaru' (回る) means "to rotate," 'nai' (ない) is the negative suffix, and 'sushi' (寿司) means "sushi" (a traditional Japanese cuisine), the literal meaning of 'mawaranai sushi' is "sushi that does not rotate."

To tell you the truth, 'mawaranai sushi' is a slang term that was made as an antonym of 'kaiten zushi' (回転寿司), the literal meaning of which is "rotating sushi."

To be continued.
回らない寿司 Part 2

9月1日は私の誕生日だったので、少しだけ特別なことをしました。

それは、「回らない寿司」を食べに行くことです。

「回る」は "to rotate"、「ない」は否定語、「寿司」は "sushi" を意味するので、「回らない寿司」の文字どおりの意味は "sushi that does not rotate" です。

実を言うとこの言葉は、「回転寿司」に対して作られた俗語です。

続く
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
Belated Happy Birthday, Toru san ~
Toru
Thank you for the correction and comment! Sharu san. (^^)

You are welcome.

Osusowake (おすそわけ - Sharing)

Sep 2, 2019 13:00
Osusowake

When distributing goods or benefits that you received to your friends or others, it is called 'osusowake' (おすそわけ).

'O' (お) is a polite prefifx, 'suso' (すそ) means "hem (of kimono)," 'wake' (わけ) means "to distribute/divide," so the literal meaning of 'osusowake' is "to distribute one's hems."

Here, since "hem" is the edge of clothes and are close to the ground, it can also mean "trivial thing" or "unimportant thing."

Because of this, 'osusowake' originally meant to distribute something to lower-ranking people -- some people think that it is rude to use this word to higher-ranking people.
おすそわけ

人からもらった品物などを、さらに友人や知人などに分け与えることを、「おすそわけ」と言います。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「すそ」は "hem"、「分け」は "to distribute/divide" を意味するので、「おすそわけ」の文字どおりの意味は "to distribute one's hems" となります。

「すそ」は、着物の端で、地面に近い箇所であることから、「つまらないもの」「重要でないもの」という意味も持っています。

このため、もともと「おすそわけ」は、品物の一部を目下の者に分け与えるという意味を持っており、目上の人に使うのは失礼と考える人もいます。
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
So, when giving a gift to someone you are visiting, if it's a higher-rank person, is it ok if I say 'つまらないものですが。。' while handing over the gift?
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

> So, when giving a gift to someone you are visiting, if it's a higher-rank person, is it ok if I say 'つまらないものですが。。' while handing over the gift?
It is okay because it's a traditional phrase when giving a gift. However, these days, some people think that the phrase つまらないものですが is not appropriate. It may be better to use 心ばかりのものですが (meaning "this is a small present").
In the following entry, I used the word "boring" as a translation of つまらない.
https://lang-8.com/kanotown/journals/202687925376577900030995601610876159022

My pleasure.

Thank you for the detailed explanation. Wasn't aware about this word - 心ばかり. I'll use this from now on. :)

Nōryō (納涼 - Enjoying Cool in Summer) Part 2

Aug 31, 2019 21:56
Nōryō

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'nōryō' (納涼), which means to feel cool and spend the hot summer comfortably by various ideas.

Specifically, people drink or eat cold things, feel cool breezes near a river, and watch fireworks that could cause goose-bumps.

These events related to 'nōryō' are usually held after the evening from the end of July to mid-August -- in other words, the season of 'nōryō' this year has already passed.

Incidentally, festivals that are held for the purpose of 'nōryō' is called 'nōryōsai' (納涼祭) by adding 'sai' (祭 - "festival").
納涼 Part 2

昨日は、工夫して暑い夏を涼しく過ごすことを意味する「納涼」という言葉を紹介しました。

具体的には、冷たい食べ物や飲み物を飲んだり、川の近くで涼風を感じたり、鳥肌が立つような花火を打ち上げたりします。

基本的に納涼に関する行事は、7月末から8月前半の夕方以降に行われることが多いです。

夏の暑い時期に「納涼」を目的に催される祭りは、"festival" を意味する「祭」をつけて「納涼祭」と呼ばれます。

つまり、8月末の今は「納涼」の季節ではありません。
No. 1 シャル❇️'s correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

My pleasure

Nōryō (納涼 - Enjoying Cool in Summer) Part 1

Aug 29, 2019 20:01
Nōryō Part 1

Several days ago, I introduced the Japanese term 'hisho' (避暑), which means to move to a cool place temporarily to avoid the summer heat.

Unfortunately, since I do not have much time and money, it is not easy to visit 'hishochi' (避暑地 - "cool places for hisho").

Even such situations like me, people often conduct various ideas to feel cool and spend the hot summer comfortably.

This act/idea is called 'nōryō' (納涼).

'Nō' (納) means "to bring in" and 'ryō' (涼) means "cool," so 'nōryō' literally means "to bring in cool."
納涼 Part 1

先日、夏の暑さを避けるため一時的に涼しい場所に移動することを意味する「避暑」という言葉を紹介しました。

残念ながら、私は時間的にも金銭的にもあまり余裕がないので、「避暑地」を訪れることは簡単ではありません。

そのような場合でも、夏の暑さを凌いで涼しく過ごすために、さまざまな工夫をすることがあります。

これを「納涼」と言います。

「納」は「取り入れる」、「涼」は「涼しさ」を意味するので、「納涼」は文字どおり「涼しさを取り入れる」という意味になります。
No. 1 Pajh's correction
You write very interesting posts about Japanese language and culture.
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

My pleasure

Karuizawa Part 2

Aug 29, 2019 09:15
Karuizawa Part 2

This entry continues from yesterday's one.

At almost the same time when Alexander Croft Shaw built a villa and church in Karuizawa, a railway was extended to there.

Furthermore, due to the influence of Shaw, Western hotels and churches were built one after another.

Because of these backgrounds, Karuizawa has developed as a summer resort for foreigners, and later, Japanese people came to build their villas here.

Now Karuizawa is very popular because people who live in Tokyo can go in about an hour by 'Shinkansen' (新幹線 - "bullet train").

I would like to have my villa in Karuizawa someday.
軽井沢 Part 2

この投稿は、昨日の投稿の続きです。

アレクサンダー・クロフト・ショーが軽井沢に別荘と教会を建てたのと同時期に、軽井沢に鉄道が通りました。

さらに、ショーの影響で洋式ホテルや教会などが次々と建てられました。

このような背景から、軽井沢は外国人避暑地として発展し、日本人もここに別荘を建てるようになったというわけです。

軽井沢は、東京から新幹線で約1時間で着くアクセスの良さからも、人気があります。

いつか私も軽井沢に別荘を持ちたいです。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Karuizawa Part 1

Aug 27, 2019 15:30
Karuizawa Part 1

Yesterday, I introduced you to the term 'hishochi' (避暑地), which means cool places where people visit to avoid the summer heat.

Among various places called 'hishochi', 'Karuizawa' (軽井沢) is one of the most famous and popular ones.

Karuizawa flourished as a post station in the past, but it declined with changes in transportation conditions.

However, in 1885, things changed when a Canadian Anglican missionary incidentally visited Karuizawa -- his name was Alexander Croft Shaw.

Shaw felt that the climate of Karuizawa was similar to his hometown, Toronto, and he built a villa and a church to make Karuizawa his lifetime summer resort.

To be continued.
軽井沢 Part 1

昨日は「避暑地」という言葉を紹介しました。

日本の避暑地として代表的なものに「軽井沢」があります。

軽井沢はかつて宿場町として栄えた土地ですが、交通事情の変化に伴って衰退しました。

しかし、1885年、カナダ人の聖公会宣教師アレクサンダー・クロフト・ショーがたまたま軽井沢を訪れることで、一変します。

彼は軽井沢の気候が故郷のトロントと似ていると感じ、生涯の避暑地とすべく別荘や教会を建てました。

続く

Hishochi (避暑地 - Summer Resort)

Aug 26, 2019 22:18
Hishochi

Moving to a cool place temporarily to avoid the summer heat is called 'hisho' (避暑) in Japanese.

'Hi' (避) means "avoid," 'sho' (暑) means "heat/hot," and the combination 'hisyo' literally means "avoid the heat (of summer)."

In addition, places, where people visit to avoid the summer heat, is called 'hishochi' (避暑地) by adding 'chi' (地 - "place/land").

It is said that 'hishochi' in Japan began when foreign merchants, missionaries, and teachers pioneered the land and built villas for avoiding the summer heat.

These days, it is not rare for wealthy Japanese people to have their villas in cool places.

Even if you do not have your villa, you can visit 'hishochi' in a short period by using a hotel.
避暑地

夏の暑さを避けるため、一時的に涼しい場所に移動することを「避暑」と言います。

「避」は "avoid"、「暑」は "heat" を意味し、「避暑」は文字どおり "avoid the heat (of summer)" を意味します。

また、避暑のために訪れる土地のことを「避暑地」と言います。

「避暑地」は、明治時代に外国人の商人や宣教師が避暑のための別荘地を造ったのがはじまりとされています。

現在では、日本人の富裕層が避暑地に別荘を持つことは珍しくはありません。

別荘が無くても、ホテルや旅館を利用すれば短期的に避暑地を訪れることができます。
No. 1 Mac's correction
It's funny, in Canada we have quite the opposite situation, where people have winter homes. I suppose you could call them 避冷:P Would that be pronounced as ひひや?
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
> I suppose you could call them 避冷:P Would that be pronounced as ひひや?
Oh, that was close!
This is not a common term, but avoiding the winter cold is called 避寒 (read as "hikan") -- 寒 (kan) means "cold."
And the cultural difference is interesting. I heard that the climate of the Japanese famous 避暑地 called 軽井沢 (Karuizawa) is similar to Toronto's one.

Hane wo Nobasu (羽を伸ばす - Letting Loose)

Aug 26, 2019 11:21
Hane wo Nobasu

Last weekend, I took an action called 'hane wo nobasu' (羽を伸ばす).

'Hane' (羽) means "wing" or "feather" and 'nobasu' (伸ばす) means "to stretch," so the literal meaning of 'hane wo nobasu' is "to stretch one's wings."

This idiom actually means that you are released from a repressed situation and let loose.

Imagine a bird stretching the wings and flying off.

The expression 'hane wo nobasu' was born by imaging such a bird flying freely.

You can translate this into English as "to let loose" or "to stretch out."
羽を伸ばす

私はこの休日、「羽を伸ばしました」。

「羽」は "wing"、「伸ばす」は "to streach" を意味するので、「羽を伸ばす」の文字どおりの意味は "to stretch one's wings" となります。

「羽を伸ばす」は、抑圧された状況下から開放されて、伸び伸びと自由に振る舞うことを意味します。

鳥が羽根を大きく伸ばし、空に羽ばたいていく様子を想像して下さい。

この慣用句は、そんな自由な鳥をイメージして生まれたというわけです。

英語では "to let loose" や "to stretch out" のように言うことができます。
No. 1 pyrpoi's correction
I agree "to let loose" is a good translation. But, you can "stretch your wings" in English as well. We use it less often, I would think. Like when you move out of your parents' house.
Toru
Thank you for the comment!
I didn't know the fact. :)

Very interesting post.
In English we also have the expression "To stretch/spread one's wings" but it has a slightly different meaning:

"to start to do new and interesting things that you have not done before."
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post and letting me know that!
I learned something new. :)

Well done!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Ikinuki (息抜き - Breather)

Aug 26, 2019 10:33
Ikinuki

People need 'ikinuki' (息抜き) in their lives.

'Ikinuki' means to rest, relax or refresh for a while when having a break in your work.

Since 'iki' (息) means "breath" and 'nuki' (抜き) means "to get out of," the literal meaning of 'ikinuki' is "to get breath out of somewhere."

That is to say, 'ikinuki' means to release the tension by getting the breath (air) out of one's body, and it can be rephrased as "rest," "relax" or "refresh."

It is very important to balance between work and rest for showing the best performance.
息抜き

人が生きていく上で、「息抜き」は必要不可欠です。

「息抜き」とは、仕事の間などに緊張を解いて、しばらく休憩したり気分転換することを意味します。

「息」は "breath"、「抜き」は "to get out of" を意味するので、「息抜き」の文字どおりの意味は "to get breath out of somewhere" となります。

すなわち「息抜き」は、身体の中に溜まった息(空気)を抜いて、緊張を緩めるということであり、「休憩」と言い換えることもできます。

「休憩」と「仕事」のバランスは、効率良くパフォーマンスを発揮するために重要です。
No. 1 AlohaAloha's correction
Yes, it is important!
Toru
Thank you for teh correction! :)

You're welcome!

Torihada (鳥肌 - Goose Bumps)

Aug 23, 2019 14:31
Torihada

A phenomenon that a lot of fine bumps appear on a person's skin due to cold, fear, or discomfort is called 'torihada' (鳥肌) in Japanese.

Since 'tori' (鳥) means "bird" and 'hada' (肌) means "skin," the literal meaning of 'torihada' is "bird's skin."

As you can easily guess, this name comes from the fact that the skin with fine bumps is similar to the skin of a bird with feathers removed.

It is often idiomatically used as 'torihada ga tatsu' (鳥肌が立つ) by adding 'tatsu' (立つ - "to rise").
鳥肌

寒さや恐怖、不快感などで、肌に大量の細かい突起が出る現象や、その肌のことを「鳥肌」と言います。

「鳥」は "bird"、「肌」は "skin" を意味するので、「鳥肌」の文字どおりの意味は "bird's skin" となります。

この名称は、細かい突起が出た肌が、羽をむしり取られた鳥の肌と似ていることに由来します。

慣用的に、"to rise" を意味する「立つ」を使って「鳥肌が立つ」と言うことが多いです。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
It's not as common, but I've heard goosebumps called "chicken skin" in Texas too :) .
Toru
Thank you for letting me know! I learned something new. :)

No problem :)

Pāpeki (パーペキ - Perfect)

Aug 22, 2019 15:42
Pāpeki

Today, I noticed that the slang term 'pāpeki' (パーペキ) was used.

'Pāpeki' is a composite term that combines the English word "perfect" and the Japanese word 'kanpeki' (完璧 - "perfect").

Its meaning is basically the same as "perfect," but it can be more emphasized by combining two words having the same meaning.

'Pāpeki' seems to have been widely used by young people around 30 to 40 years ago, but these days it is becoming a dead word.

However, I think that most Japanese people can imagine the meaning of 'pāpeki' if only to hear the sound.
パーペキ

私は今日、「パーペキ」という俗語表現を聞きました。

「パーペキ」は英語の "perfect" と日本語の「完璧」を組合せた合成語です。

意味は基本的に "perfect" と同じですが、二つ同じ意味の語を組み合わせることで、その意味合いはより強調されています。

「パーペキ」は30-40年前に若者の間でよく使われていたようですが、最近では死語になりつつあります。

ただ、大抵の日本人であれば、「パーペキ」と聞けばその意味を予想できるのではないかと思います。
No. 1 blueshaman's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Mamagoto (ままごと - House)

Aug 21, 2019 18:55
Mamagoto

Children (especially girl) sometimes play 'mamagoto' (ままごと/飯事).

'Mamagoto' is as a kind of plays that players imitate a family life, such as cooking or inviting guest, and you can see this everywhere in Japan (probably everywhere all over the world).

'Mama' (まま) is not the English word "mama;" it comes from the children's word 'manma/mama' (まんま/まま), which means "meal."

In addition, 'goto/koto' (ごと/こと) means "event" or "act."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'mamagoto' is "meal event/cooking act."
ままごと

幼児(特に女児)の遊びに「ままごと」があります。

「ままごと」は、炊事や家庭生活を模した遊びで、日本各地で(おそらく世界中でも)見られます。

「まま」は英語の "mama" ではなく、食事を意味する幼児語「まんま」「まま」から来ています。

また、「ごと」は「出来事」や「行為」を意味します。

すなわち「ままごと」の文字どおりの意味は、「炊飯の出来事/行為」というわけです。
No. 1 Judy's correction
Children play this in America too.
Toru
Thank you for correcting me and letting me know that! :)

Tapiru (タピる)

Aug 21, 2019 17:39
Tapiru

In Japan, tapioca and tapioca drinks have become very popular since around last year.

Along with this boom, young people (especially school girls) has come to use the slang term 'tapiru' (タピる).

'Tapi' (タピ) is short for 'tapioka' (タピオカ - "tapioca") and '-ru' (る) is a suffix that can make a noun a verb.

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'tapiru' is "do tapioca," but this does not make sense.

As you can image, 'tapiru' actually means "to drink tapioca drinks" or "to eat tapioca."
タピる

去年頃から、日本でタピオカおよびタピオカドリンクがブームになっています。

このブームに伴って、若者(特に女子中高生)の間で使われるようになった言葉に「タピる」があります。

「タピ」は「タピオカ」の略、「る」は名詞を動詞にする際に使われる接尾語です。

つまり「タピる」の文字どおりの意味は「タピオカをする」ですが、これでは意味がとおりません。

実際には、「タピオカドリンクを飲む」や「タピオカを食べる」の意味で使われます。
No. 1 Judy's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Kurushī (苦しい - Painful/Difficult)

Aug 20, 2019 15:08
Kurushī

Now I am in a state called 'kurushī' (苦しい).

'Kurushī' is a term that describes a physically difficult state due to pain or heat, or a mentally difficult state due to suffering or sadness.

There are several theories about the etymology of 'kurushī', but the most accepted theory is that it comes from an onomatopoeia, 'kurukuru' (くるくる).

'Kurukuru' represents that something is rotating, and is also used to express that your head spins or you are confused.

That is to say, 'kurushī' implies that your state is so difficult that you are confused.
苦しい

私は今、「苦しい」です。

「苦しい」は、痛みや熱などで肉体的につらい状態や、悩みや悲しみなどで精神的につらい状態を表す言葉です。

「苦しい」の語源は諸説ありますが、有力なものは「くるくる」という擬態語から来ているというものです。

「くるくる」は、何かが回転していることを表す擬態語であり、目が回ることや頭が混乱することなどを表す際にも使われます。

すなわち「苦しい」は、目が回ったり混乱したりするほどつらい状態を表しているというわけです。
No. 1 pyrpoi's correction
This was awesome!

I love etymology.

Thanks for the information.
Toru
Thank you for the comment! (^^)

Ibitsu (いびつ - Distorted)

Aug 20, 2019 11:41
Ibitsu

A distorted or awkward shape is described as 'ibitsu' (いびつ/歪) in Japanese.

'Ibitsu' comes from 'iibitsu' (飯櫃), which was once used in many houses in Japan.

'Ii' (飯) means "rice" and 'bitsu/hitsu' (櫃) means "container," so 'iibitsu' means "container for (cooked) rice."

Since the shape of 'iibitsu' was usually ellipse, it came to mean also "elliptical shape."

Furthermore, 'iibitsu' came to mean that the shape/state/property of something is distorted.

For example, 'ibitsu na kokoro' (いびつな心 - its literal meaning is "distorted mind") means "twisted mind."
いびつ

形がゆがんでいることを、「いびつ(歪)」と言います。

「いびつ」は、かつて多くの家庭で使われていた「飯櫃(いいびつ)」から来ています。

「飯」は "rice" を、「櫃」は "container" を意味し、「飯櫃」は炊いた飯を入れておくお櫃のことを意味します。

飯櫃は楕円形のものが主流であったため、「飯櫃」は楕円形を意味するようになりました。

さらに、形や状態がゆがんでいるという意味を持つようになったというわけです。

例えば、"mind" を意味する「心」につけて「いびつな心」とすると、"twisted mind" という意味になります。
No. 1 Star's correction
面白い!Very interesting!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

Tsuke ga Mawaru (付けが回る - Deserving Thoughtless Behavior)

Aug 19, 2019 19:36
Tsuke ga Mawaru

I have enjoyed Bon holidays and hardly worked for the last few days.

As a result, the work that I had to do was piled up, and now I am forced to do a lot of work simultaneously.

Such situations where you are forced to do something difficult as a result of your thoughtless action can be described as 'tsuke ga mawaru' (付けが回る) in Japanese.

'Tsuke' means "bill" and 'mawaru' (回る) means "to come around," so the literal meaning of 'tsuke ga mawaru' is "bills come around."

Needless to say, a situation where a lot of bills come to you is horrible.
付けが回る

私はここ数日、長期休暇を満喫し、ほとんど仕事をしませんでした。

その結果、たくさんの仕事を同時にこなさなければならなくなりました。

このように、あとからまとめて始末や処理をしなければならない状況になることを、「付けが回る」と言います。

「付け」は支払い請求書を意味するので、「付けが回る」は「請求書がまわってやってくる」という意味です。

大量の請求書が後からまとめてやってくると、大変なのは言うまでもありません。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
Good job :) this always happens to me when there's a holiday... haha.
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)
It is a sad fate, haha.

Bon Holidays: Day 3 (August 16th)

Aug 19, 2019 17:31
Bon Holidays: Day 3 (August 16th)

Today, I went to Tokyo DisneySea with my friend.

The number of visitors per year to Tokyo DisneySea is around 15.5 million -- making it the fifth most popular park worldwide.

When entering DisneySea, we first took FastPass for the new ride named "Soaring: Fantastic Flight," which debuted on July 23rd this year.

I felt comfortable because we came to be able to get FastPass on a smartphone app.

Soaring was literally fantastic -- I felt as if I was really flying in the sky.

Amazingly, the waiting time for riding Soaring without using FastPass was up to 350 minutes.
お盆休み 三日目(8月16日)

私は今日、東京ディズニーシーに行きました。

ディズニーシーの来場者数は年間約1550万人で、世界第5位の規模です。

入園したら、まずは7月23日に登場したばかりのアトラクション「ソアリン」のファストパスをとりました。

「ソアリン」の登場と同時に、ファストパスがアプリでとれるようになったので、とても快適に感じました。

まるで本当に空を飛んでいるような、文字どおりファンタスティックな体験となりました。

ちなみに、ファストパスを使わなかった場合の「ソアリン」の待ち時間は最大約350分となっており、驚愕でした。

Bon Holidays: Day 2 (August 15th)

Aug 18, 2019 23:50
Bon Holidays: Day 2 (August 15th)

Today, I decided to rest my body the whole day because I felt so tired and had pain in my leg muscles.

I did not go outside except for a little time -- I ate fast food and watched movies using a projector at home with my friend.

Using a service called Disney DELUXE (Disney's movies/videos distribution service), we enjoyed various Disney movies made in different ages.

To tell you the truth, we plan to go to Tokyo DisneySea tomorrow, so this watching movies is a kind of preparation for enjoying our visit more.
お盆休み 二日目(8月15日)

今日は足が筋肉痛になり疲労感もあったため、丸一日体を休めることにしました。

外出はほとんどせず、家でインスタント食品を食べたり、プロジェクタを使って映画を見たりしました。

Disney DELUXE (ディズニーの映画・動画配信サービス)を契約し、古い作品から最近の作品までさまざまな映像を楽しみました。

実は、明日はディズニーシーに行く予定なので、より楽しむための準備を兼ねているというわけです。

Bon Holidays: Day 1 (August 14th)

Aug 17, 2019 22:09
Bon Holidays: Day 1 (August 14th)

During this period in Japan, many Japanese people are on Bon Holidays.

I was working in Bon holidays for the last several years, but I decided to rest and go play outside this year.

First, I went to Tokyo Disneyland with my friend.

The number of visitors per year to Tokyo Disneyland is around 17 million -- this is the third-largest number in all amusement parks in the world.

Since it was a day of Bon holidays, Disneyland was very crowded, but we could enjoy enough.

I walked and stand for a long time after a long time, so I was very tired.

Incidentally, although it is Tokyo Disneyland, it is not located in Tokyo -- it is actually located in Chiba (next to Tokyo).
お盆休み 一日目(8月14日)

この時期、日本はお盆休みです。

私はここ数年、お盆も仕事をしてきましたが、今年はしっかりと休んだり遊んだりすることにしました。

まずは、東京ディズニーランドに行きました。

東京ディズニーランドの来場者数は年間約1700万人で、世界のアミューズメントパークの中でも3位の規模です。

お盆休みということもあり、かなり混雑していましたが、楽しめました。

久々に長時間歩いたり立ったりしたので、くたくたです。

ちなみに、「東京ディズニーランド」という名前ですが、実際には「東京都」ではなくその隣の「千葉県」にあります。
No. 1 clumi's correction
I think it'd be a lot of fun to go to Tokyo disney one day! My daughter and I watch videos of some of the rides they have that aren't in Disney World in Florida, which is also a great time!
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
Yes, the rides are fantastic, but I think that the waiting time for riding them (especially on holidays) in Tokyo Disneyland is too long, haha.

Ichiban Saisho/Ichban Saigo (一番最初/一番最後 - First/Last)

Aug 17, 2019 21:45
Ichiban Saisho/Ichiban Saigo

I often hear and say the phrases, 'ichiban saisho' (一番最初) and 'ichiban saigo' (一番最後) in daily conversation.

'Ichiban' (一番) means "most," 'saisho' (最初) means "first," and 'saigo' (最後) means "latest," so the literal meanings of 'ichiban saisho' and 'ichiban saigo' are "the most first" and "the most last," respectively.

These are redundant expressions, and some people think they are not correct Japanese.

However, they may not be wrong if you think that 'saisho' and 'saigo' means a range (i.e., "first part" and "last part"), and 'ichiban' refers to an edge point of the range.

You should not use 'ichiban saisho' and 'ichiban saigo' in formal documents, but I think that they have come to be widely accepted in daily conversation.
一番最初/一番最後

私は日常会話で、「一番最初」や「一番最後」という表現をよく聞きますし、よく使います。

「一番」は "most"、「最初」は "fist"、「最後」は "last" を意味するので、「一番最初」と「一番最後」の文字どおりの意味は、それぞれ "the most first" と "the most last" になります。

これは重複表現(英語では "redundant expression")であり、正しくない日本語と考える人もいます。

ただし、「最初」や「最後」が指す対象が領域的なものであり、その中でも最も端であることを表す(強調する)ためであると考えれば、一概に誤りとは言えないとも思います。

「一番最初」「一番最後」という表現は正式な文書では避けるべきですが、日常会話では広く許容されつつあると感じています。
No. 1 Sagan's correction
English also has lots of redundancies!
Added bonus
Blend together
End result
Free gift
Overexaggerate
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post and letting me know the expressions!

About quotation marks, I am glad if you read my profile page. :)
https://lang-8.com/kanotown

Amamoyō (雨模様 - Threatening Sky)

Aug 13, 2019 18:39
Amamoyō

It was not 'amamoyō' (雨模様) this morning, but it started to rain in the afternoon.

'Ama/ame' (雨) means "rain" and 'moyō' (模様) means "pattern," so the literal meaning of 'amamoyō' (you can read this as 'amemoyō') is "rain pattern."

In actual conversations, this term is used to express a sky that looks like it is going to rain soon.

However, these days, people tend to use 'amamoyō' when expressing rainy (drizzling) weather.

The latter is not the original correct meaning, but the new usage has gradually come to be accepted.
雨模様

今朝は「雨模様」ではありませんでしたが、昼過ぎには雨が降ってきました。

「雨」は "rain"、「模様」は "pattern" を意味するので、「雨模様」の文字どおりの意味は "rain pattern" です。

実際には、「雨がふりそうな空のようす」を表す際に使われます。

しかし近年では、「雨(特に小雨)が実際に降っているようす」を表す際に「雨模様」を使う人も増えています。

本来は正しい使い方ではありませんが、後者の意味も認められつつあるようです。

Petto Botoru (ペットボトル - Plastic Bottles)

Aug 13, 2019 15:51
Petto Botoru

Plastic bottles are called 'petto botoru' (ペットボトル) in Japanese.

'Petto botoru' can be written as "PET bottle" in English, and "PET" is short for a kind of plastic, "polyethylene terephthalate."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'petto botoru' is "bottle made of polyethylene terephthalate."

If English speakers hear that you say "pet bottle," they can make a big misunderstanding, so please be careful when using this term.

Incidentally, the consumption of plastic bottles in the world exceeds one million every minute, and the garbage problem is getting more acute.
ペットボトル

"Plastic bottle" のことを日本では「ペットボトル」と言います。

「ペットボトル」は "PET bottle" と書き、"PET" は "polyethylene terephthalate" を略したものです。

すなわち「ペットボトル」の文字どおりの意味は、「ポリエチレンテレフタラートを使って作られた容器」というわけです。

英語圏の人が「ペットボトル」と聞いたら、大きな誤解をしてしまう可能性があるので、注意して下さい。

ちなみに、ペットボトルの消費量は1分間に100万を超えており、ゴミの問題が深刻化しています。
No. 1 Kagoshima Girl's correction

Open Campus

Aug 12, 2019 16:38
Open Campus

Today, an event called "Open Campus" was held at my university.

"Open Campus" is an event where universities, colleges, or vocational schools provide information and explanations about their facilities to people who are thinking about entering the school.

I heard some universities offer simulated lectures, laboratory tours, the experience of school cafeterias, stamp rallies, and free shuttle buses.

In the past, universities usually did not like to disclose their facilities of the campus, but most universities have held open campuses and disclose various information since the 2000s.

Note that the meaning of "open campus" in Japan seems to be different from that in English.
オープンキャンパス

今日私の大学では「オープンキャンパス」と呼ばれるイベントが催されました。

「オープンキャンパス」は、大学や専門学校が、入学を検討している人に対して、施設の公開や説明などを行うイベントです。

模擬的な講義や、研究室見学ツアー、学食、スタンプラリー、無償送迎バスなどを提供する大学もあります。

かつて、大学はその構内を積極的に公開していませんでしたが、2000年代以降は多くの大学でオープンキャンパスが開催されるようになりました。

英語の "open campus" とは意味が異なるようなので、注意して下さい。
No. 1 Jess's correction
What is the meaning of "open campus" in Japanese?
Toru
Thank you for the correction!

> What is the meaning of "open campus" in Japanese?
The meaning of "open campus" in Japan is as I wrote in this entry. In other words, it means "the college's/university's open day for high school students."

According to the following page, the meaning of "open campus" is different.
https://spartanspeaks.com/10318/news/open-campus-offers-pros-and-cons/

Shikō Sakugo (試行錯誤 - Trial and Error)

Aug 11, 2019 15:16
Shikō Sakugo

I like a kind of methods for solving problems, 'shikō sakugo' (試行錯誤).

'Shikō' (試行) means "to try something" and 'sakugo' (錯誤) means "error" or "mistake."

That is to say, 'sikō sakugo' means that you try to find a method for solving a problem by repeating trial and error.

As mentioned above, this four-character idiom is often translated as "trial and error."

However, somehow many Japanese people refer to "trial and error" as 'torai ando erā' (トライアンドエラー - "try and error").
試行錯誤

私は、問題解決の基本的な手法である「試行錯誤」が好きです。

「試行」は「何かを試しに行うこと」、「錯誤」は「誤り」や「間違い」を意味します。

すなわち「試行錯誤」とは、なにか新しい物事に対して課題があるとき、試みと失敗を繰り返しながら解決に近づいていくことを意味します。

英語では "trial and error" と訳されます。

日本では、「トライアンドエラー」と間違えて言う人が多いです。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Shunjun (逡巡 - Flinching)

Aug 9, 2019 18:14
Shunjun

To flinch or hesitate can be described as 'shunjun' (逡巡) in Japanese.

Shince 'shun' (逡) means "to step back" or "to hesitate" and 'jun' (巡) means "to move around," the literal meaning of 'shunjun' is "to move around while feeling hesitant."

In other words, 'shunhun' means to be shy away from something.

Usually, this term is used like 'shunjun-suru' (逡巡する) by adding 'suru' (する), which means "do."

Incidentally, 逡巡 can also be used as a unit of number that represents 10 to the power of -14, though this unit is rarely used.
逡巡

尻込みしたり、ぐずぐずしたりすることを、日本語で「逡巡」と言います。

「逡」は「しりぞく」や「ためらう」を、「巡」は「めぐる」を意味するので、「逡巡」の文字どおりの意味は「しりぞいて/ためらってめぐる」となります。

すなわち、決断ができずぐずぐずするということです。

多くの場合、"do" を意味する「する」をつけて「逡巡する」のように使います。

ちなみに、滅多に使われませんが、「逡巡」は10の-14乗を表す数の単位でもあります。
No. 1 David's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Nekomatagi (ねこまたぎ - Bad Fish/Fish Bone)

Aug 8, 2019 16:42
Nekomatagi

Today, I learned the Japanese expression, 'nekomatagi' (ねこまたぎ).

Since 'neko' (ねこ/猫) means "cat" and 'matagi' (またぎ) means "to step over," the literal meaning of 'nekomatagi' is "what a cat steps over."

This term seems to be used mainly in Hokkaido (northern Japan) and the Kansai region (western Japan), but the meanings are very different.

In Hokkaido, it means fish that taste so bad that even cats pass by.

In the Kansai region, it means fish that were eaten neatly leaving only bones -- there is no part to eat even for cats.
ねこまたぎ

今日は「ねこまたぎ」という表現を知りました。

「ねこ」は "cat"、「またぎ」は "to step over" を意味するので、「ねこまたぎ」の文字どおりの意味は "what a cat steps over" となります。

この言葉は、主に北海道や関西地方で使われているようですが、意味は大きく異なります。

北海道では、魚好きな猫でさえまたいで通り過ぎるほどまずい魚を意味します。

一方で関西地方では、猫が食べる部分がないくらい、綺麗に骨だけ残して食された魚を意味します。

Gyokuseki Konkō (玉石混淆 - Mixture of Wheat and Chaff)

Aug 7, 2019 20:22
Gyokuseki Konkō

A state that superior things and inferior things are mixed is described as 'gyokuseki konkō' (玉石混淆).

'Gyoku' (玉) means "jewel" or "genuine one," and 'seki' (石) means "stone" or "fake."

In addition, 'konkō' (混淆/混交) means that different things are mixed.

That is to say, 'gyokuseki konkō' literally means a state that "genuine and fake things," "superior and inferior things," or "worth and worthless things" are mixed.

This four-character idiom comes from the Chinese book "Baopuzi," which was written by Ge Hong in around 300 AD.
玉石混淆

優れたものと劣ったものが入り混じっている状態のことを、「玉石混淆」と言います。

「玉」は「宝石」や「本物」、「石」は文字どおり「石」や「偽物」を意味します。

そして「混淆/混交」は、異なるものが入り混じることを意味します。

すなわち「玉石混淆」は、文字どおり「本物と偽物」「優れたものと劣ったもの」「価値の高いものと低いもの」が入れ混じった状態を意味するわけです。

この四字熟語は、西暦300年頃に中国、東普の葛洪(かっこう)が執筆したとされる書物「抱朴子」に由来します。

Bucchake (ぶっちゃけ - Frankly)

Aug 6, 2019 22:58
Bucchake

When saying your thoughts simply without disguise, you can use the slang term, 'bucchake' (ぶっちゃけ).

'Bucchake' became popular among young people in 2003 and is still used mainly by current young people.

It is thought that this term comes from 'uchiakeru' (打ち明ける), which means "to confess something."

Usually, 'bucchake' is used at the beginning of a statement or as a verb.

For example, you can say 'bucchake, kaeritai' (ぶっちゃけ、帰りたい - "frankly, I wanna go home"), or 'kare wa fuman wo bucchaketa' (彼は不満をぶっちゃけた - "he let out all his complaints").
ぶっちゃけ

なにかを包み隠さず端的に言うとき、「ぶっちゃけ」という俗語を使うことがあります。

「ぶっちゃけ」は2003年に流行した若者言葉で、現在でも若者を中心に使われます。

この言葉は、"confess" を意味する「打ち明ける」が変化したものと考えられています。

発言の頭で使うこともあれば、動詞として使うこともあります。

例えば、「ぶっちゃけ、帰りたい」「彼は不満をぶっちゃけた」のように使います。
No. 1 pyrpoi's correction
Thank you for the Japanese Lesson!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Capsule Hotel (カプセルホテル)

Aug 5, 2019 18:22
Capsule Hotel

Have you ever stayed at a capsule hotel (カプセルホテル)?

There are many capsule hotels in Japan, especially in Tokyo.

Capsule hotels are one of the types of lodging, and guests sleep in capsule-shaped boxes that are stacked in two rows and aligned horizontally.

Since it is cheaper than regular hotels, you can save money, but there are several problems with noise, comfort, and security.

I used capsule hotels on business trips several times, but I could not relax and rest enough, because the space of the capsule was very narrow and noise such as snoring irritated me.
カプセルホテル

カプセルホテルに泊まったことはありますか?

日本、特に東京の都市部にはとても多くのカプセルホテルが存在します。

カプセルホテルは宿泊施設であり、利用客は二段に積まれたカプセル状の空間内で就寝します。

通常のホテルに比べると安価なため、節約は可能ですが、騒音や快適性、セキュリティなどの問題があります。

私も出張の際に何度か利用したことがありますが、いびきなどの音がストレスとなり、リラックスして休めませんでした。
No. 1 Lisa JD's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
大変そうだね。I don't mind sleeping in a small space, but only if I had privacy and a quiet room.
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post!
Yes, quietness is most important for me. :)

Wasshoi (わっしょい)

Aug 4, 2019 12:12
Wasshoi

Summer has come, and festivals began to be held in various places.

In summer festivals in Japan, portable shrines called 'mikosi' (神輿) are often carried by dozens of people as a part of the events.

Since 'mikoshi' is heavy, people have to call out to adjust the timing of putting muscle.

The most common phrase when carrying 'mikoshi' is 'wasshoi' (わっしょい).

There are several theories about the etymology of 'wasshoi'.

One of the most acceptable theories says that 'wa' (わ) and 'shoi' (しょい) comes from 'heiwa' (平和 - "peace") and 'seou' (背負う - "to carry something piggyback").
わっしょい

本格的な夏が到来し、各地で祭りが催され始めました。

日本の夏祭りでは、数人~数十人で神輿を担いで街を渡御する行事がよく行われます。

神輿は重たいので、声を掛け合い息を合わせて運ばなければいけません。

このときの掛け声として最も一般的なものは、「わっしょい」です。

「わっしょい」の語源には幾つかの説があります。

一つの有力な説は、「わ」は「平和」、「しょい」は「背負う/背負え」から来ているというものです。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
No. 2 David's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
That is an interesting question.
The literal meaning of 有力 is indeed "powerful," but when it is used with 理論 (theory), the meaning changes a little. In fact, my dictionary said that 有力な理論 means "the widely accepted theory" or "the most popular/probable/believed theory."
There are other theories, but they are not popular.

> Which did you mean? Also, did you see me message?
Sorry, I will reply to your message later.

Shibu-shibu (渋々 - Unwillingly/Reluctantly)

Aug 3, 2019 23:39
Shibu-shibu

Yesterday, I introduced the Japanese term 'shibui kao' (渋い顔), which means "sour face."

By repeating 'shibu' (渋 - "bitter"), it becomes another term 'shibu-shibu' (渋々/渋渋), which means to do something unwillingly.

'Shibui kao' conveys an unwilling emotion to the surroundings, whereas 'shibu-shibu' implies that someone is unwillingly moved into action.

Usually, terms that describe an action follows 'shibu-shibu'.

For example, you can say 'hikkoshi wo shibu-shibu tetsudatta' (引っ越しを渋々手伝った - "I unwillingly helped someone move") or 'shibu-shibu aruita' (渋々歩いた - "I reluctantly walked").
渋々

昨日は「不愉快そうな顔」を意味する「渋い顔」という表現を紹介しました。

"Bitter" を意味する「渋」を繰り返して「渋々」とすると、「嫌々ながら何かをするさま」を表すことができます。

「渋い顔」は不快な感情を周囲に伝えるだけですが、「渋々」は不快に思いながらも行動に移しているわけです。

「渋々」は通常、その後に行動を表す言葉が続きます。

例えば、「引っ越しを渋々手伝った」「渋々歩いた」のように使います。
No. 1 David's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Shibui Kao (渋い顔 - Sour Face)

Aug 2, 2019 18:38
Shibui Kao

I usually have a 'shibui kao' (渋い顔) when feeling bad, uncomfortable, or offended.

Since 'shibui' (渋い) means "bitter" and 'kao' (顔) means "face," the literal meaning of 'shibui kao' is "bitter face."

'Shibui kao' is usually used to mean a sour face, but it can also mean an attractive face of a man.

The adjective 'shibui' can be a compliment to express an adult firm man or a tasteful thing.

For example, you can say 'shibui otoko' (渋い男 - "dandy") or 'shibui tokei' (渋い時計 - "cool watch").
渋い顔

私は嫌なことや不快なことがあると、たいてい「渋い顔」をします。

「渋い」は "bitter"、「顔」は "face" を意味するので、「渋い顔」の文字どおりの意味は "bitter face" です。

通常「渋い顔」は、不愉快そうな顔の意味で用いられますが、「(男性の)引き締まった魅力的な顔」の意味で用いられることもあります。

「渋い」という形容詞は、落ち着いた男性や、味わい深いものに対する褒め言葉にもなるのです。

例えば、「渋い男」や「渋い時計」のように言うことができます。
No. 1 Mario 魏汉杰Bellamazzaマリオさん's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
> I am not sure what you wanted to say here so I made an educated guess.
渋い contains the nuance of "old/classic," so "a classic handsome man" may be more appropriate.

Yome (嫁 - Daughter-in-Law)

Aug 2, 2019 14:30
Yome

A daughter-in-law is called 'yome' (嫁) in Japanese.

However, many Japanese men refer to their wives as 'yome'.

Originally, this usage was not correct, but recently it has been widely spread and has been listed in Japanese dictionaries as the meaning of "wife" or "newlywed wife."

On the internet, some people called 'otaku' (おたく - "geek/nerd") say '○○ wa ore no yome' (○○は俺の嫁 - which literally means "○○ is my wife") to an anime character.

Incidentally, according to the internet, some people hate the term 'yome', so please be careful when using it.


息子の妻のことを、日本語で「嫁」と言います。

しかしならが、自身の妻のことを指して「嫁」と呼ぶ日本人も多くいます。

これは本来の使い方ではないのですが、最近では広く浸透し、正しい意味として辞書にも載っています。

インターネット上では、アニメのキャラクタなどに対して「○○は俺の嫁」のように使う人もいます。

ちなみに、「嫁」という表現を好まない人も多くいるようなので、注意して下さい。
No. 1 Aitherguard's correction
Excellent journal entry. Keep up the good work practicing English. Your topic was very interesting.
Toru
Thank you for the correction and comment!
I understand well. :)
Aitherguard
You're welcome, I am happy that I was able to help you.
No. 2 AlohaAloha's correction
Interesting!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)
Today I wrote about quotation marks in my introduction page. :)
https://lang-8.com/kanotown
AlohaAloha
You have a cool blog!
No. 3 sjstrauss's correction
Toru
Thank you for the helpful comment!

I am often confused about the position of commas and periods. Because some said something like "punctuation marks should always go inside quotation marks," whereas some said not so. (Some said it depends on the country/region.) For now, I have used the style of academic journal papers that I often refer to.
sjstrauss
It could be something that depends on the country/region; I've seen a few things recently different from American English that have been like that/surprised me. The academic journal papers are probably the best way to go though; that is a good idea :) .

Shikeru (時化る - Stormy Sea)

Jul 31, 2019 18:15
Shikeru

The Japanese term 'shikeru' (時化る) means that a storm makes the rough sea or the rough sea brings a poor haul.

'Shikeru' comes from 'Shikke' (湿気), which means "humidity/moisture," and it was originally meant cloudy weather.

Later, 'shikeru' came to mean the stormy sea from the meaning of cloudy weather.

In addition, it can also mean deterioration in the economy or feeling depressed.

For example, you can say 'shiketa mise' (しけた店 - which means "seedy store") or 'shiketa kao' (しけた顔 which means "glum look").
時化る

雨風が強く海が荒れることや、海が荒れて不漁になることを「時化る(しける)」と言います。

「時化る」は "humidity/moisture" を意味する「湿気」から来ており、かつては空が曇るという意味で使われていました。

後に、天候が崩れることから海が荒れるという意味になったというわけです。

また、転じて「景気が悪くなること」や「気持ちが落ち込むこと」も意味します。

例えば、「しけた店」や「しけた顔」のように使うことができます。
No. 1 JessLFLynn's correction
Very Interesting. In English we say this is the etymology of a word, which is the origin of the word.

I corrected the sentence to be 'correct' grammatically in English, (I hope - I am not sure about the quotations), but I also wrote another sentence that may explain or express what you are trying to say a little better. Because you are talking about specific words and meanings, I think you can use double quotation (") marks for all of the words and meanings.
Toru
Thank you for the correction and comment!
I like to write about etymologies. :)

> I think you can use double quotation (") marks for all of the words and meanings.
To tell you the truth, in my posts, I've used single quotes temporarily instead of italics for Japanese terms. Because I learned that foreign languages should be written in italics. When my posts on Lang-8 move to my blog, single quotation marks are removed and changed to italics like the following page.
https://blog.kano.ac/2019/07/31/shikeru/
JessLFLynn
Awesome, thanks for letting me know!

Akubi wo Kamikorosu (あくびを噛み殺す - Suppressing a Yawn)

Jul 30, 2019 17:53
Akubi wo Kamikorosu

It is not good to yawn when someone is talking about important things.

If you want to yawn in such a case, you will close your mouth and try hard not to yawn.

This act is expressed as 'akubi wo kamikorosu' (あくびを噛み殺す) in Japanese.

'Akubi' (あくび) means "yawn," 'kami' (噛み) means "to bite," and 'korosu' (殺す) means "to kill," so the literal meaning of 'akubi wo kamikorosu' is "to bite and kill a yawn."

I think that this expression is easy to convey a feeling that you do not want to yawn.
あくびを噛み殺す

大事な話しているとき、「あくび」をするのは態度が良くありません。

そのようなときにあくびをしたくなったら、口を閉じて必死に我慢すると思います。

この行為を、「あくびを噛み殺す」と言うことがあります。

「あくび」は "yawn"、「噛み」は "to bite"、「殺す」は "to kill" を意味するので、「あくびを噛み殺す」の文字どおりの意味は "to bite and kill a yawn" となります。

あくびを出したくない気持ちが伝わる、わかりやすい比喩表現だと思います。
No. 1 Kody104's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

JIS Standards

Jul 30, 2019 15:08
JIS Standards

In Japan, there are national standards called JIS (Japanese Industrial Standards).

When referring to JIS, we often say 'JIS kikaku' (JIS規格) by adding the term 'kikaku' (規格).

In fact, this expression is also used on the web page of JISC (Japanese Industrial Standards Committee), which coordinates and publishes JIS.

However, since 'kikaku' means "standard," some people think that the expression 'JIS kikaku' is redundant and wrong.

Such redundant expressions are called RAS syndrome (Redundant Acronym Syndrome syndrome).

For example, 'IT gijutsu' (IT技術 - literally means "Information Technology technology") is a kind of RAS syndrome.
JIS規格

日本には、国家標準の規格として JIS (Japanese Industrial Standards: 日本産業規格) があります。

我々はよく、JIS に「規格」をつけて「JIS規格」のように言います。

実際、JIS の調査や審議を行っている JISC (Japanese Industrial Standards Committee: 日本産業標準調査会) の Webページ でも、「JIS規格」という表現が使われています。

しかし、「規格」は "standard" を意味するため、「JIS規格」は "standard" が重複しており、冗長で正しくないとする見方もあります。

このような重複表現のことを、RAS症候群 (Redundant Acronym Syndrome syndrome) と言います。

例えば、「IT技術」なども RAS症候群の一つです。
No. 1 bennatan's correction
I enjoyed the article. Nothing to correct that I can see.
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)
No. 2 Aubrey's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Hakaba made Motteiku (墓場まで持っていく - Taking Something to One's Grave)

Jul 28, 2019 19:04
Hakaba made Motteiku

Do you have a serious secret that you cannot talk to anyone?

Such a deep secret is sometimes described as 'hakaba/haka made motteiku' (墓場/墓まで持っていく).

Since 'hakaba/haka' (墓場/墓 means "grave" and 'motteiku' (持っていく) means "to take something to somewhere," the literal meaning of 'hakaba made motteiku' is "to take something (secret) to one's grave."

In other words, this expression implies that someone never tells his/her secret in their life, and goes into the grave with the secret.
墓場まで持っていく

決して人に言えない重大な秘密はありますか?

一生涯誰にも言えないような秘密のことを、「墓場まで持っていく」と形容することがあります。

「墓場」は ""、「持っていく」は "" を意味するので、「墓場まで持っていく」の文字どおりの意味は "" です。

つまり、誰にも言わないまま一生を終え、その秘密と一緒に墓に入ってしまうというわけです。
No. 1 dec's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
No. 2 sjstrauss's correction
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)
sjstrauss
You're welcome :)

Shaka ni Seppō (釈迦に説法 - Preaching to the Choir)

Jul 28, 2019 15:54
Shaka ni Seppō

I noticed that some presenters used the Japanese phrase 'shaka ni seppō' (釈迦に説法) in an academic conference I participated in.

Since 'shaka' (釈迦) means "Buddha" and 'seppō' (説法) means "preach (of Buddha)," the literal meaning of 'shaka ni seppō' is "preach of Buddha to Buddha."

Imagine a situation that someone teaches a Buddha's sermon to Buddha himself.

You know it is an embarrassing and stupid act.

Like this, to teach or explain something to an expert/specialist in the field is described as 'shaka ni seppō'.
釈迦に説法

先日参加した学会で、数名の発表者が「釈迦に説法」という表現を使っていました。

「釈迦」は "Buddha"、「説法」は "preach (of Buddha)" を意味するので、「釈迦に説法」の文字どおりの意味は "preach of Buddha to Buddha" となります。

お釈迦様が説いた説法を、お釈迦様本人に教え聞かせるという行為を想像してみて下さい。

とても愚かで恥ずかしいことだと思います。

このように、何かにとても詳しい人に対して、それを教えたり説明したりすることを、「釈迦に説法」と言います。
No. 1 brian 's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Harebutai (晴れ舞台 - Big Moment)

Jul 26, 2019 22:34
Harebutai

In most cases, everyone will have several 'harebutai' (晴れ舞台) in his/her life.

'Hare' (晴れ) usually means "sunny," but it can also mean "radiant/beaming."

In addition, 'butai' (舞台) means "stage," so the literal meaning of 'harebutai' is a "radiant stage."

In other words, it is a very important and radiant moment in one's life.

For example, an entrance ceremony, a graduation ceremony, and a wedding ceremony can be described as 'harebutai'.

Incidentally, the dressed-up and proud appearance in 'harebutai' is called 'haresugata' (晴れ姿 - "radiant appearance").
晴れ舞台

誰にでも大抵、人生に何度か「晴れ舞台」があります。

「晴れ」は通常 "sunny" を意味しますが、"radiant/beaming" を意味することもあります。

また、「舞台」は "stage" を意味するので、「晴れ舞台」の文字どおりの意味は "radiant stage" となります。

言い換えると、「人生において重要な晴れがましい場所・場面」というわけです。

例えば、「入学式」「卒業式」「結婚式」などのことを、よく「晴れ舞台」と言います。

ちなみに、晴れ舞台での着飾った姿や誇らしい姿のことを「晴れ姿」と言います。
No. 1 okonomiyaki's correction
Thank you for teaching me about harebutai!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Jinkō Chinō (人工知能 - Artificial Intelligence)

Jul 25, 2019 20:17
Jinkō Chinō

'Jinkō Chinō' (人工知能) is one of the major themes of the academic conference I am participating in.

Since 'jin' (人) means "human" or "people" and 'kō' (工) means "create," 'jinko' (人工) means "man-made" or "artificial."

In addition, since 'chi' (知) means "knowledge" and 'nō' (能) means "ability," 'chinō' (知能) means "intelligence."

As you can guess, 'jinkō chinō' literally means "artificial intelligence (AI)."

In Japan, this stream of AI is described as "the third artificial intelligence boom," and it is expected to use AI in various fields.
人工知能

私が現在参加している学会は、「人工知能」が一つの大きなテーマになっています。

「人」は "human" や "people"、「工」は "create" を意味するので、「人工」の意味は "man-made" や "artificial" となります。

また、「知」は "knowledge"、「能」は "ability" を意味するので、「知能」の意味は "Intelligence" となります。

ご想像のとおり、「人工知能」は文字どおり "artificial inteligence (AI)" を意味します。

現在は人工知能の第三次ブームとも呼ばれ、さまざまな領域での人工知能の活用が期待されています。
No. 1 David's correction
Is the conference available online? The subject interests me. Are you giving another speech?

Another, as always, enlightening post.
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
The conference name is "JAMIT 2019." Unfortunately, their contents are not available online (only the subjects are available). http://jamit2019.jamit.jp/program.html
David
Would you believe I participated in the first major "incarnation" (did you come up with a better word?) of AI? In 1989 I helped bring in an expert system program (I haven't heard that term in years) in the company I worked for. It went from AI spring to AI winter in about 6 months.

I worked for AT&T. (Southwestern Bell). There was a "guru" who had convinced management that a rule based system could replace the method they were using to rate telephone calls (a billing related function) and by doing so eliminate a dozen programmers. . Good idea but the technology wasn't up to it then. If you like behind the scene stories you might like this one.
Toru
Wow, that's amazing! And the historical stories of AI sound interesting. I will try to check that on the web. :)

Deer in Nara

Jul 24, 2019 20:56
Deer in Nara

Today I came to Nara to participate in an academic conference.

The conference venue was near Nara Park, which is famous for deer, so I saw a lot of deer on the way to the venue.

According to a survey, the number of deer living in Nara Park is about 1400.

Indeed, I felt that there were deer everywhere in the park.

Furthermore, since there were a lot of deer droppings, it was not easy to avoid them.

Incidentally, when I got on a bus to go to a hotel I reserved, the bus was crowded, and a child kicked my pants.

Unfortunately, his shoes were very dirty -- probably he stepped on a lot of deer droppings.
奈良の鹿

今日は学会参加のため、奈良県に来ています。

会場は鹿で有名な奈良公園の近くに位置しているので、会場に向かう途中多くの鹿を見かけました。

ある調査によると、奈良公園に生息する鹿の数は、現在約1400頭だそうです。

確かに、いたるところ鹿であふれていたように感じました。

そして、いたるところに鹿の糞があり、避けるのが大変でした。

ちなみに、帰りにバスに乗ったところ、混雑していて、子供にズボンを蹴られました。

その子供の靴を見ると、大量の鹿の糞を踏んだ跡がありました。
No. 1 Makita's correction
yuck! / ouch! ಠ_ಠ

did he dirty your pants a lot? (⇀‸↼)
Toru
I couldn't confirm obvious dirt. But I will send my pants to the cleaners as soon as I get home. :)

Kibisu wo Kaesu (踵を返す - Returning Back)

Jul 23, 2019 08:28
Kibisu wo Kaesu

When I read a Japanese novel, I found that the idiom 'kibisu wo kaesu' (踵を返す) appears repeatedly.

踵 (meaning "heel") is usually read as 'kakato', however, it is read as 'kibisu' (which is an old reading) in this idiom.

In addition, 'kaesu' (返す) means "to return" or "to take back," so the literal meaning of 'kibisu wo kaesu' is "to return one's heel(s)."

Imagine that you return your heels to the direction in which you had come -- in other words, this idiom means "to go back" or "to return back."
踵を返す

ある小説を読んでいると、「踵を返す」という表現が何度も出てきました。

"" を意味する「踵」は通常「かかと」と読みますが、この慣用句の中では「きびす」と読みます。

また、「返す」は "to return" や "to take back" を意味するので、「踵を返す」の文字どおりの意味は "to return one's heel(s)" となります。

「踵」を元来た方角に戻すことから、「踵を返す」は「後戻りする」や「引き返す」といった意味を持ちます。
No. 1 dec's correction
In English, I think that this would mean "to turn tail (and run)."

It basically means 引き返す (to retrace one's steps) but has has an extra dimension of fear and/or cowardice. Like how a cat will draw in its tail if feels threatened.
Toru
Thank you for the comment! I learned something new. :)
But I think that 踵を返す do not include nuances of and/or cowardice. It is just another expression of 引き返す.
dec
I meant that the English expression has the "extra" meaning.
Toru
Oh, I get it. Sorry!
No. 2 Makita's correction
Is the Japanese language hard to learn or master even for Japanese people? (just curious ^ ^ )
Toru
Thank you for reading my post!
Yes, it is difficult even for us to remember various readings of kanji. :)
Makita
I can imagine ^ ^

The Readings of 博士

Jul 22, 2019 17:11
The Readings of 博士

I have a 博士 degree in engineering.

博士 means "Doctor," "Doctor of Philosophy," or " knowledgeable professional," and it has two different readings -- 'hakase' and 'hakushi'.

Generally, 博士 is read as 'hakase'.

For example, when calling a well-informed person (物知り博士 read as 'monoshiri hakase') or an expert (専門家 read as 'senmonka') with respect, you should say 'hakase'.

Meanwhile, it is read as 'hakushi' when describing an official doctoral degree in Japan.

Incidentally, we often use the English term "doctor" or "PhD" instead of 'hakushi'.
「博士」の読み方

私は「博士」の学位を持っています。

「博士」の読み方は、「はかせ」と「はくし」の二通りあります。

一般的に「博士」は、「はかせ」と読むことが多いです。

例えば、物知りな人や専門家に対して尊敬を込めて呼ぶ場合は、「はかせ」となります。

一方、日本における正式な学位を指して言う場合は、「はくし」と読みます。

ちなみに、日本語を使わず「Doctor」や「PhD」と言うことも多いです。
No. 1 Zac's correction
とてもわかりやすくて、面白かったです!
" "と' 'を区別した方がいいと思います。
Toru
添削ありがとうございます!
実は、シングルクォーテーションは斜体の意味で使っています(Lang-8 の投稿では斜体を表現できないので)。私のブログ上では、それらはすべて斜体に変換しています。 :)
Zac
こちらこそ投稿を添削してくれてありがとうございます!
「" "」と「' '」なんですが、斜体じゃなくて「一個単一引用符」と「二重引用符」の違いについて書いていました。普段引用するときは点々みたいに二個点を書いて、一個はアポストロフィーと言います。
斜体って初耳でした(笑)
Toru
You're welcome. :)
すみません、説明が下手でした。
私は、英文中の外国語を斜体 (Italic) にすると学んだのですが、Lang-8 には Italic の機能がないので、一時的に ' ' を使って目印をつけています。 ' ' は一時的なもので、以下のURLのように、最終的に削除されます (Italic に置き換えられます)。英単語の引用の際は、基本的に " " のみを使っています。
https://blog.kano.ac/2019/07/22/the-readings-of-doctor/
https://blog.kano.ac/2019/07/21/furyo/

Sorry for my poor explanation. Previously, I learned that foreign languages (such as Japanese) should be written in italics, but we cannot use italics on Lang-8, so in my posts, I've used single quotes (apostrophes) temporarily instead of italics for Japanese terms. When my posts on Lang-8 move to my blog, they are removed and changed to italics like the above web pages.
Zac
あー、なるほどね~
丁寧な説明ありがとうございます!

Furyō (不良 - Rogue/Hood)

Jul 21, 2019 23:57
Furyō

Many 'furyō' (不良) live in my hometown.

'Fu' (不) is a negative prefix and 'ryō' (良) means "good," so the literal meaning of 'furyō' is "not good."

This term is often used for products, data, or debt, to mean defective products, bad data, or bad debt, respectively.

On the other hand, it is also used as an abbreviation for 'furyō-kōi shōnen' (不良行為少年).

Since 'kōi' (行為) means "action" and 'shōnen' (少年) means "boy," so the combination means "boys (or girls) who take bad actions."
不良

私の地元には、多くの「不良」が住んでいます。

「不」は否定の接頭辞、「良」は "good" を意味するので、「不良」の文字どおりの意味は "not good" です。

この言葉は、「製品」や「データ」、「債権」などに対してもよく使われます。

しかし、「不良行為少年」の略語として使われることもあります。

「行為」は "act、"「少年」は "boy" を意味するので、「不良行為少年」は "boys (or girls) who take bad actions0" を意味します。
No. 1 Dakota's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Entenka (炎天下 - Under the Hot Sun)

Jul 21, 2019 11:22
Entenka

In summer, you can hear the word 'entenka' (炎天下) on Japanese TV news.

Since 'en' (炎) means "fire/blaze," 'ten' (天) means "sky," and 'ka' (下) means "under," so the literal meaning of 'entenka' is "under the blazing sky."

In other words, it means "under the burning sun."

Some people say 'entenka no moto' (炎天下の下 - the literal meaning is "under under the burning sun") or 'entenka no naka' (炎天下の中 - the literal meaning is "in under the burning sun"), but these phrases are not correct Japanese.
炎天下

夏になると、テレビのニュースなどで「炎天下」という単語が登場します。

「炎」は "fire/blaze"、「天」は "sky"、「下」は "under" を意味するので、「炎天下」の文字どおりの意味は "under the blazing sky" です。

すなわち、「焼き付けるような強い日差しの下」ということです。

「炎天下の下」や「炎天下の中」などと言う人もいますが、これらは重複表現で厳密には正しい日本語ではありません。
No. 1 Michelle's correction
Thanks for the Japanese lesson!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

Ikasama (イカサマ - Cheating/Fraud)

Jul 20, 2019 18:01
Ikasama

Cheating in gambling and a fraudulent practice are called 'ikasama' (イカサマ) in Japanese.

'Ikasama' can be written as 如何様 in kanji -- 'ika' (如何) means "how" and 'sama' (様) means "condition/state."

Originally, 'ikasama' literally meant "how (is that)," but the meaning came to change into "too true" or "to be sure."

Furthermore, 'ikasama' came to mean "as if it were true," then it was used to represent "magic trick" or "gimmick."

Such meanings have almost faded away today, and it is usually used to mean "cheating (in gambling)."
イカサマ

賭博における不正行為や、詐欺的行為のことを「イカサマ」と言います。

「イカサマ」は漢字で「如何様」と書き、「如何」は「どのように」、「様」は「様子」を意味します。

「如何様」はもともとは文字どおり「どのように」という意味を持っていましたが、「いかにもそのとおり」という意味に変わりました。

さらに、「いかにも本当であるように思わせる」という意味に転じ、手品やカラクリのことを表すようになりました。

現在では、「手品」などの意味は薄れ、「不正行為」の意味で使われることがほとんどです。
No. 1 Raigetsu's correction
Your post is always very educational!
I've learned somwthing new again from you. :D
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! (^^)
No. 2 Raigetsu's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Cold Summer

Jul 20, 2019 17:56
Cold Summer

In Japan, most days of July in this year were rainy.

Especially in Tokyo, the sunshine duration per day has been less than three hours for twenty consecutive days.

This severe lack of sunshine had a serious influence on agriculture, and the price of vegetables has risen strongly.

Of course, the temperature is lower than ordinary years -- it has been suggested that this summer may become 'reika' (冷夏 - literally means "cold summer") for the first time in 26 years.

In the swimming pool in Tokyo's amusement park 'Toshimaen' (としまえん), the number of people going to the pool decreased by 95% compared to the same period of the last year.
冷夏

今年の7月は、雨の日がとても多いです。

東京では、20日連続で1日あたりの日照時間が3時間未満となっています。

深刻な日照不足は農業に大きな影響を与え、野菜などの農作物が高騰しています。

気温が低い日も続き、26年ぶりの冷夏になる可能性が示唆されています。

東京にある遊園地「としまえん」のプールは、例年の同時期に比べて客数が95%減ったそうです。
No. 1 ilvrbts's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Namaiki (生意気 - Impudent/Insolent)

Jul 17, 2019 20:13
Namaiki

Previously, I introduced the term 'sharakusai' (しゃらくさい), which means "impudent" or "insolent."

To tell you the truth, 'sharakusai' is rarely used by today's young people -- the most common Japanese term that means "impudent/insolent" is 'namaiki' (生意気).

'Nama' (生) means that something is halfway or lukewarm, and 'iki' (意気) means a positive attitude.

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'namaiki' is to get out of line with a halfway attitude.

This term often used as an adjective that describes characteristics of "person," "speaking," or "attitude."
生意気

私は以前、"impudent" や "isolent" を意味する「しゃらくさい」という言葉を紹介しました。

「しゃらくさい」は現在ではあまり使われず、"impudent" や "insolent" に相当する最も一般的な日本語は「生意気」です。

「生」は何かが中途半端なこと、「意気」は積極的な心構えのことを意味します。

すなわち「生意気」は、「中途半端な心構えで出すぎた言動をとること」を意味するというわけです。

「生意気」は、「人」や「発言」、「態度」などの前につくことが多いです。
No. 1 Lythe's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
> Impudent isn't a common word. Where did you learn it?
I found this word when looking up the English translation of 生意気 in my dictionary.
Lythe
Oh okay. I recommend just using 'insolent'.
Toru
Thank you! (^^)

Jiji Kokkoku (時々刻々 - Every Moment)

Jul 16, 2019 20:20
Jiji Kokkoku

Things vary by 'jiji kokkoku' (時々刻々).

'Ji' (時) means "time" or "hour," 'koku' (刻) means "moment," the kanji 々 represents a repetition, and the combination 'jiji kokkoku/jiji kokukoku' means that events or changes of things occur gradually and continuously.

Since 'jikoku' (時刻) means just "time (of day)," the passage of time is expressed by repeating this.

Incidentally, you can write 'jiji kokkoku' as 時時刻刻 without using the kanji character 々.

In English, it can be translated as "from hour to hour" or "every moment."
時々刻々

物事は「時々刻々」と変化します。

「時」は "time"、「刻」は時間の単位、そして漢字の「々」は繰り返しを意味し、「時々刻々」は「出来事や物事の変化が続けざまに起こること」を意味します。

単に「時刻」で "time (of day)" を意味するので、これを繰り返すことで時間の経過を表しているというわけです。

ちなみに、繰り返し文字を使わず「時時刻刻」と書くこともできます。

英語では、"from hour to hour" や "every moment" のように言い換えられます。
No. 1 Makita's correction
very useful
「時々刻々」はとてもおもしろい!
No. 2 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
Yalmar
You're welcome :)

The Obligation of Paid Leave

Jul 15, 2019 10:47
The Obligation of Paid Leave

Paid leave has been made obligatory since April 1st, 2019.

To be specific, the law is that employers must make workers who have more than 10 days paid leave per year use more than 5 days paid leave.

In other words, workers have to take at least a total of 5 days off from work.

If workers do not take enough paid leave, the employer can be fined.

In fact, I was also ordered to apply for paid leave more than a total of 5 days.

However, I cannot afford to take a vacation now.
有給休暇義務化

今年の4月1日から、有給休暇が義務化されました。

具体的には、「年間10日以上の有給休暇が与えられる労働者に対して、最低5日の有給を消化させることを義務とする」というものです。

簡単に言い換えると、「休日を除いて年間5日間は休みなさい」ということです。

この基準を守らなかった場合、雇用者は罰金に処される可能性があります。

実際、私も年5日は有給休暇の申請をするよう言われました。

しかし今は、休んでいる余裕はありません。
No. 1 ジョナサン's correction
Well written!
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

18782 + 18782

Jul 14, 2019 23:46
18782 + 18782

Today, I will give you the last quiz about digits.

"18782" -- do you know that these numbers mean?

"1," "8," "7," "8," and "2" can be read as 'i' (い), 'ya' (や), 'na' (な), 'ya' (や), and 'tsu' (つ, which comes from "two"), respectively, so "18782" can be read as 'iyanayatsu' (いやなやつ/嫌な奴), which means "jerk/bastard."

In addition, the result of "18782 + 18782" is "37564."

"3," "7," "5," "6," and "4" can be read as 'mi' (み), 'na' (な), 'go' (ご), 'ro' (ろ), and 'shi' (し), respectively, so "37564" can be read as 'minagoroshi' (みなごろし/皆殺し), which means "massacre."
18782 + 18782

今日で、語呂合わせクイズは一旦終わりにします。

"18782" -- これが何を意味するかわかりますか?

「1」は「い(ち)」、「8」は「や」、「7」は「な(な)」、「8」は「や」、「2」は「つ(英語の two から)」と読むことができるので、「18782」は「いやなやつ」と読み替えられます。

また、「18782 + 18782」 の計算結果は「37564」です。

「3」は「み」、「7」は「な」、「5」は「ご」、「6」は「ろ(く)」、「4」は「し」と読むことができるので、「37564」は「みなごろし」と読み替えられます。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction

931 and 201

Jul 13, 2019 16:09
931 and 201

I will continue to give you a quiz about digits.

"931" and "201" -- do you know what these numbers mean?

"9," "3," and "1" can be read as 'ku' (く), 'sa' (さ), and 'i' (い), respectively, so "931" can be read as 'kusai' (くさい), which means "stink/stinky."

"2," "0," and "1" can be read as 'ni' (に), 'o' (お), nad 'i' (い), so "201" can be read as 'nioi' (におい), which means "smell."

You can combine the above two numbers like "931201" (くさいにおい - "stinky smell").

Incidentally, if you write "11201" (いいにおい), you can mean "good smell."
931 と 201

今日も、語呂合わせクイズです。

「931」と「201」、それぞれ何を意味するでしょうか?

「9」は「く」、「3」は「さ」、「1」は「い」と読むことができるので、「931」は「くさい」と読み替えられます。

「2」は「に」、「0」は「(アルファベットのオーから)お」、「1」は「い」と読むことができるので、「201」は「におい」と読み替えられます。

上記の二つは「931201」とつなげて「くさいにおい」とすることもできます。

ちなみに、「11201」とすれば「いいにおい」を表すことができます。
No. 1 Gemmajane's correction
Gemmajane
All reads perfectly to me
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)

1122 and 2525

Jul 12, 2019 10:30
1122 and 2525

I will continue to give you a quiz about digits for only a few days.

"1122" and "2255" -- do you know that these digits mean?

"1" and "2" can be read as 'i/ichi' (い/いち) and 'fu' (ふ) respectively, so "1122" can be read as 'iifūfu' (いい夫婦), which means "a good married couple."

"2" and "5" can be read as 'ni' (に) and 'ko/go' (こ/ご) respectively, so "2525" can be read as 'nikoniko' (にこにこ), which is an onomatopoeia that represents a smile.

These digits are popular as car license plate numbers in Japan.
1122 と 2525

もう少しだけ、語呂合わせクイズを続けます。

「1122」と「2525」、これらの数字が何を意味するかわかりますか?

「1」は「い(ち)」、「2」は「ふ」と読むことができるため、「1122」は「いい夫婦」と読み替えられます。

「2」は「に」、「5」は「こ/ご」と読むことができるため、「2525」は「笑顔」を表す擬態語「にこにこ」に読み替えられます。

これらの数字は、日本の車のナンバーとして人気です。
No. 1 Lampros's correction
haha,that's cool~2525😃
Toru
Thank you for the comment! :) 25
No. 2 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)
Yalmar
You're welcome :)

39 and 49

Jul 11, 2019 10:33
39 and 49

I would like to continue to give you a quiz of digits.

"39" and "49" -- do you know what these digits mean?

"3" and "9" can be read as 'san' (さん) and 'kyū' (きゅう), respectively, so "39" can be read as 'sankyū' (さんきゅう - "Thank you").

Note that 'sankyū' can mean "maternity leave" when writing it as 産休 in kanji.

"4" and "9" can be read as 'shi' (し) and 'kyū' (きゅう), respectively, so "49" can be read as 'shikyū' (しきゅう/至急), which means "urgently."
39 と 49

今日も語呂合わせクイズを出します。

「39」と「49」、これらの数字が何を意味するかわかりますか?

「3」は「さん」、「9」は「きゅう」と読むことができるので、「39」は「さんきゅう」と読み替えられます。

「さんきゅう」は漢字で「産休」と書くと "maternity leave" という意味になることに注意して下さい。

「4」は「し」、「9」は「きゅう」と読むことができるので、「49」は「しきゅう(至急)」と読み替えられます。
No. 1 dec's correction
産休をいただき、サンキュウ!
と言われている時代って、恥ずかしくないか。
Toru
オヤジギャクをありがとうございます笑
調べてみたら、宮村優子という日本の声優が、「産休〜Thank You〜」というアルバムを発売していました。
dec
事実はフィクションよりおかしいね。
No. 2 Niko-Neko's correction
This is fun :)
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)
No. 3 Eric's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

4649 and 084

Jul 10, 2019 17:44
4649 and 084

Today, I will introduce "4649" and "084."

Can you imagine what these digits mean in Japan?

"4," "6," "4," and "9" can be read as 'yo' (よ), 'ro' (ろ), 'shi' (し), and 'ku' (く), respectively, so "4649" can be read as 'yoroshiku' (よろしく), which means "thank you" or "nice to meet you."

"0," "8," and "4" can be read as 'o' (お), 'ha' (は), and 'yo' (よ), respectively, so "084" can be read as 'ohayo' (おはよ), which means "good morning."
4649 と 084

今日は、「4649」と「084」を紹介します。

それぞれ、日本語で何を意味するかわかりますか?

「4」は「よ」、「6」は「ろ」、「4」は「し」、「9」は「く」と読むことができるので、「4649」は「よろしく」と読み替えられます。

「0」は「オ」、「8」は「は」、「4」は「よ」と読むことができるので、「084」は「おはよ」と読み替えられます。
No. 1 demonhead's correction
0も46い
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
"1" is read as い(ち), so you can write 0も461 :)
No. 2 Makita's correction
Cute ^^
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! (^^)
Makita
you're welcome ^ ^
No. 3 Hami's correction
タイトルは「しくしく」ですね (;_;)
Toru
あ、本当だ!
教えてくれてありがとうございます!(;o;)

Poketto Beru (ポケットベル - Pager/Beeper) Part 2

Jul 9, 2019 10:23
Poketto Beru Part 2

In my post yesterday, I wrote that 'poketto beru' (ポケットベル - "pager/beeper") has followed a course of decline.

In fact, the telecommunication service for personal use will be terminated in September 2019, though the radio waves for 'poketto beru' will continue to be used in the community wireless system for disaster prevention.

Incidentally, 'poketto beru' could send and receive characters such as alphabets and Katakana in the mid-1990s, but before that, it supported only digits.

Because of this, various messages by combining several digits became popular.

I will try to introduce those digit messages tomorrow.
ポケットベル Part 2

昨日、ポケットベル(英語では "pager" や "beeper")は衰退の一途を辿っていると書きました。

実際、今年の9月に個人向けのサービスは終了しますが、今後ポケットベルの電波は防災無線用として使われ続けていくようです。

ちなみに、ポケットベルは1990年代半ばにアルファベットやカタカナなど文字の送受信が可能になりましたが、それ以前は数字のみに対応していました。

このため、数字の語呂合わせによるさまざまなメッセージの送受信が流行していました。

明日からはそれらの例を紹介していこうと思います。
No. 1 JSS's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Poketto Beru (ポケットベル - Pager/Beeper) Part 1

Jul 8, 2019 15:24
Poketto Beru Part 1

In the 1990s, 'poketto beru' (ポケットベル), commonly called 'pokeberu' (ポケベル), was very popular in Japan.

'Poketto beru' is a wireless telecommunications system to send signals or messages, and the name comes from two English terms, "pocket" and "bell" -- it is known as "pager" or "beeper" in the U.S.

Unfortunately, as mobile phones have become widespread since the mid-1990s, 'poketto beru' has followed a course of decline.

Eventually, it was decided that the telecommunication service for personal use will be terminated in September 2019.

To be continued.
ポケットベル Part 1

1990年代、日本ではポケットベル(通称「ポケベル」)が普及していました。

「ポケットベル」は無線で合図を送るシステム(無線呼び出し)のことで、英語の "pocket" と "bell" を組み合わて作られた名称ですが、英語では "pager" や "beeper" と呼ばれます。

1990年代半ばになると、携帯電話の登場によって、ポケットベルは衰退の一途を辿ります。

そして今年の9月、ポケットベルは個人向けの通信サービスが終了する見込みです。

続く
No. 1 knghcm's correction
Perfectly natural-sounding text. Good job!
Toru
Thank you for the comment! I'm glad to hear you say that. :)
No. 2 Ayman's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

How to Read 2019

Jul 7, 2019 13:24
How to Read 2019

This year is 2019 A.D.

In Japan, the most common reading of 9 is 'kyū'.

On the other hand, when 9 is used with counter suffixes such as 'nen' (年 - "year"), 'getsu/gatsu' (月 - "month"), or 'ji' (時 - "o'clock"), it is usually read as 'ku' instead of 'kyū'.

In fact, the oldest Japanese broadcasting station defined the reading of '2019 nen' (2019年 - "the year 2019") as 'nisen jūku nen'.
(Note that the reading 'nisen jūkyū nen' is not completely wrong.)

However, '1999 nen' (1999年 - "the year 1999") is read as 'sen kyūhyaku kyūjū kyū nen' to fix the rhythm of the words.
2019年の読み方

今は、西暦2019年です。

「9」という数字の読み方で、最も一般的なものは「キュウ」です。

一方、「年」や「月」、「時」などの助数詞を付ける場合は、「ク」と読むことが多いです。

実際、日本で最も歴史のある放送局では、「2019年」を「ニセンジュウクネン」と読むと定めています。
(「ニセンジュウキュウネン」の読みが間違っているというわけではありません。)

しかし、「1999年」は語調を考えて「センキュウヒャクキュウジュウキュウネン」と読みます。
No. 1 -Anna安那Анна-'s correction
That's really interesting, thanks for sharing.
No. 2 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
> Do you mean, instead of 'sen kyūhyaku kyūjū ku nen' ?
Yes, according to the law of reading numbers, 99 is read as 'kyūjū ku', but it is usually read as 'kyū-jū kyū' instead of 'kyūju ku'.
Yalmar
Oh, I see. Thank you :)

Sagasu (さがす - Searching)

Jul 6, 2019 09:24
Sagasu

The most common Japanese verb meaning "to search" is 'sagasu' (さがす), but it has two notation ways by using different kanji, 探す and 捜す.

These two kanji are basically used as follows:

Use 探す when you search for what you want to get or see.

Use 捜す when you search for what you lost, what you cannot see, or someone who was missing.

For example, 探す is used when you want to find a job or hunt for treasure, whereas 捜す is used when you want to find a lost wallet or a missing person.
さがす

"To search" に対応する最も一般的な日本語の動詞は「さがす」ですが、この言葉には「探す」と「捜す」の二つの漢字があります。

これら二つの漢字表記は、基本的に以下のように使い分けます。

「欲しいもの」や「目にしたいもの・人」を見つけたいときは、「探す」を使います。

「無くしたもの」や「見えなくなったもの」、「居なくなった人」を見つけたいときは「捜す」を使います。

例えば、職業や宝物を見つけたい場合は「探す」、無くした財布や行方不明になった人を見つけたいときは「捜す」を使います。
No. 1 ilvrbts's correction
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)
No. 2 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)
Yalmar
You're welcome! :)

Tariki Hongan (他力本願 - Relying on Someone)

Jul 5, 2019 16:35
Tariki Hongan

Relying on someone or leaving your work to someone is sometimes called 'tariki hongan' (他力本願) in Japanese.

'Ta' (他) means "other," 'riki' (力) means "power," 'hon' (本) means "true," and 'gan' (願) means "wish," so you may think that this four-character idiom expresses its literal meaning.

However, both 'tariki' (他力) and 'hongan' (本願) are Buddhist terms -- 'tariki' means "the power of Amitabha Buddha" and 'hongan' means "a wish to have people become Buddha."

That is to say, originally 'tariki hongan' means "to become a Buddha relying on the power of Amitabha Buddha."

It is thought that the meaning of "relying on someone" was made from the meaning of each kanji, then it became popular.
他力本願

他人の力を当てにすることや人まかせなことを、「他力本願」と言うことがあります。

「他」は "other"、「力」は "power"、「本」は "true"、「願」は "wish" を意味するので、この四字熟語は文字どおりの意味を表しているように聞こえるかもしれません。

しかし、「他力」と「本願」は仏教用語で、それぞれ「阿弥陀仏の力・加護」、「あらゆる人々を仏にする願い」を意味します。

すなわち本来「他力本願」とは、「阿弥陀仏の力に頼って成仏すること」を意味する語というわけです。

各漢字の持つ意味から、「人まかせ」という意味の誤用が生まれ、それが定着したものと考えられます。
No. 1 Fieryterminator's correction
I hope this helps some. Please ask if I can help clarify anything.
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
> The word itself became popular, or that new definition of the word?
Sorry for my unclear sentence. I wanted to say that the new definition of the word became popular. However, the word itself also might have become popular in association with its new definition.

Onbu ni Dakko (おんぶに抱っこ - Completely Relying on Others)

Jul 4, 2019 09:15
Onbu ni Dakko

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'marunage' (丸投げ), which means to leave all the work that you have to do to someone else.

There is another expression similar to 'marunage' -- it is 'onbu ni dakko' (おんぶに抱っこ).

'Onbu' (おんぶ) means "piggyback," and 'dakko' (抱っこ) is a children's word that means "huggy (wuggy)."

Imagine that a child solicits you for huggy after you gave the child a piggy-back ride.

The expression 'onbu ni dakko' means such a situation that someone completely relies on other's favor.
おんぶに抱っこ

昨日は、自分自身の仕事を他者にすべて任せることを意味する「丸投げ」という言葉を紹介しました。

「丸投げ」と似た意味を持つ表現に、「おんぶに抱っこ」があります。

「おんぶ」は "piggyback"、「抱っこ」は "huggy (wuggy)" を意味する幼児語です。

子どもを「おんぶ」したら、続けて「抱っこ」をせがまれる状況を想像して下さい。

「おんぶに抱っこ」とは、そのように他人に好意に甘えて頼り切ることを意味する語というわけです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Amop567
  • Imagine that a child solicits you for "huggy" after you gave the child a piggy-back ride.

    "Huggy" is something a small child would say so better to put in quotes

sorry should be "a 'huggy'"
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

Marunage (丸投げ - Leave All Things)

Jul 3, 2019 19:36
Marunage

It is not good to do 'marunage' (丸投げ) your work to someone.

'Marunage' means to leave all the work or tasks that you have to do to someone.

'Maru' (丸) usually means "circle" or "sphere," but it can also mean "perfect" or "all" due to the completeness of circle/sphere.

In addition, 'nage' (投げ) means "to throw."

That is to say, 'marunage' literally means to throw all things at someone.

[Example] 'Jōshi wa itsumo watashi ni shigoto wo marunage suru' (上司はいつも私に仕事を丸投げする - "My boss always leave all his jobs to me").
丸投げ

するべき仕事を「丸投げ」するのは良いことではありません。

「丸投げ」とは、頼まれたことや自分自身の仕事を、他者にすべて任せることを意味する言葉です。

「丸」は "circle" や "sphere" を意味しますが、その完全性から「完全」や「全て」を意味することもあります。

また、「投げ」は "to throw" を意味します。

すなわち「丸投げ」は、文字どおり "to throw all things at someone" を意味するというわけです。

【例文】上司はいつも私に仕事を丸投げする。
No. 1 Makita's correction
Interesting as always. ^ ^
Has this ever happened to you?
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)
Haha, yes. Somehow I always do the work which is not actually my work.
Makita
That's good ^ ^
No. 2 dec's correction
Toru
Haha, he literally threw a circle.
No. 3 sjstrauss's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
sjstrauss
You're welcome ^^

Maruku-naru (丸くなる - Mellowing)

Jul 2, 2019 20:20
Maruku-naru

It is said that the character of people tend to 'maruku-naru' (丸くなる) as they get older.

Since 'maruku/marui' (丸く/丸い) means "round" or "circle," and 'naru' (なる) means "to become," the literal meaning of 'maruku-naru' is "to become round" or "to curl up (in a ball)."

Of course, you can use this term to express its literal meaning, whereas it can also be used to describe someone's character.

In the latter case, 'maruku-naru' means that a person who is easily angered comes to have a gentle character.
丸くなる

人は歳を重ねると性格が「丸くなる」と言われています。

「丸く/丸い」は "round" や "circle"、「なる」は "to become" を意味するので、「丸くなる」の文字どおりの意味は "to become round" や "to curl up" となります。

「丸くなる」は文字どおり体を丸めることを意味することもできますが、人の性格に対して使うこともできます。

このとき、「丸くなる」は「怒りっぽい性格が穏やかになる」という意味になります。
No. 1 Makita's correction
^^
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! (^^)
No. 2 dec's correction

Chō-dokyū (超弩級 - Extraordinary)

Jul 1, 2019 15:51
Chō-dokyū

When expressing that something is extraordinarily huge, we sometimes say 'chō-dokyū' (超弩級 or 超ド級) in Japanese.

'Chō' (超) means "super" and 'kyū' (級) means "degree."

Also, 'do' (弩/ド) is the first letter of the British battleship "Dreadnought" built in 1906.

Originally, huge and powerful battleships like "Dreadnought" were called 'dokyū-kan' (弩級艦) or 'chō-dokyū-kan' (超弩級艦) -- here, 'kan' (艦) means "ship."

Later, 'dokyū' and 'chō-dokyū' became commonly used as terms that represent something huge or powerful.
超弩級

何かが桁外れに大きいことを、「超弩級」(または「超ド級」)と言うことがあります。

「超」は "super"、「級」は "degree" を意味する日本語です。

そして「弩」は、1906年に造られたイギリスの大型戦艦「ドレッドノート」の頭文字です。

もともとは、ドレッドノートのような巨大で強力な戦艦のことを、「弩級艦」や「超弩級艦」と呼んでいました。

後に、「弩級」や「超弩級」は巨大なものや強力なものを表す言葉として一般的になったというわけです。
No. 1 Yalmar's correction
Yalmar
You should try to make more errors. I didn't have anything to correct! :)
Toru
Thank you for reading my post!
Haha, I will try to use new expressions. :)

Shari (シャリ - White/Vinegared Rice)

Jun 30, 2019 17:21
Shari

White rice or vinegared rice used for sushi is called 'shari' (シャリ) in Japan.

It is thought that 'shari' comes from a Sanskrit term "sarira" (meaning "Buddha's cremains") or "sari" (meaning "rice").

In general, outside of sushi shop, white rice is called 'kome' (米), 'hakumai' (白米), or 'gohan' (ご飯).

Incidentally, rice used for sushi is usually flavored with vinegar and is referred to as 'sumeshi' (酢飯 - literally means "vinegared rice").

There are various reasons for this; vinegared rice has effects of preservation, deodorization, and sterilization, and possess a good flavor.
シャリ

寿司に使う白米や酢飯は、「シャリ」と呼ばれます。

「シャリ」はサンスクリット語で「(釈迦の)遺骨」を意味する "sarira"、もしくは「米」を意味する "sari" から来ていると考えられています。

白米は寿司以外では、「米(こめ)」や「白米」、「ご飯」などと呼ばれます。

ちなみに、寿司に使われる米は通常、酢が加えられた「酢飯」です。

この理由は、味、防腐、防臭、殺菌などさまざまです。
No. 1 Eric's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
Toru
To tell you the truth, I didn't know that シャリ is called "sushi rice." Thank you!
Eric
No problem, I'm glad it was helpful!
No. 2 Makita's correction
Makita
Thank you, Interesting as always ^ ^
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)
No. 3 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
> I'm not sure whether by "deodorising" you meant "has a good smell"
Here, by using deodorising/deodorizing, I wanted to mean that vinegar can remove bad smell.
Yalmar
Oh I see, then it's correct :)

5C Problem

Jun 29, 2019 18:48
5C Problem

Several days ago, I encountered the "5C problem."

The 5C problem is a kind of programming errors that could occur when using Japanese characters.

Japanese characters are usually represented by two bytes in computers and programming languages.

However, when using "Shift-JIS," which is one of the Japanese character codes, the second bytes of some Japanese characters (such as 表, 十, and ソ) become '5C'.

The '5C' represents a backslash character, and it has been adopted as the escape character for many programming languages.

Because of this, some Japanese characters have a special meaning in programming, hence they could induce errors.
5C問題

私は先日、「5C問題」と遭遇しました。

5C問題とは、プログラミングなどで日本語を扱う際に起こりうる問題です。

日本語は通常、それぞれの文字が2バイトで表現されます。

しかし、日本語用文字コードの一つである Shift-JIS を使うと、特定の文字(例えば「表」や「十」、「ソ」)の2バイト目の文字コードが '5C' となります。

'5C' 単体ではバックスラッシュ記号となり、これは多くのプログラミング言語のエスケープ文字として採用されています。

このため、日本語の特定の文字がプログラミング上で特殊な意味を持ち、エラーなどを誘発するというわけです。
No. 1 Fieryterminator's correction
This was interesting to learn. Do you also know of the set of kanji included in ASCII that are not real kanji? It's very fascinating stuff.
Toru
Thank you for the correction!

> Do you also know of the set of kanji included in ASCII that are not real kanji?
I do not know that. Is it a set of kanji for jokes or something?
Fieryterminator
I spent a long time searching, but I couldn't find the page where I learned this. The story is that when computer designers first sought out to make a working Japanese alphabet in ASCII, they sent requests all over the country asking for each town name in Kanji. When it came time to transcribe them though, the designers made some mistakes, and they accidentally invented several kanji that have no meaning, but are still in the ASCII alphabet today. It's fascinating.
This isn't the link I was talking about, but here is a site that collects more "fake kanji":
http://zht.glyphwiki.org/wiki/Group:%E5%89%B5%E4%BD%9C%E6%BC%A2%E5%AD%97%E3%82%B3%E3%83%B3%E3%83%86%E3%82%B9%E3%83%88
Fieryterminator
It looks like the link didn't work, but if you can search "創作漢字", it should take you to them then.
Toru
Wow, thank you so much for letting me know that! The story and fake kanji (創作漢字) are very interesting and fascinating. I will check them more. :)
No. 2 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
Yalmar
You're welcome :)

Emi (笑み - Smiling)

Jun 28, 2019 11:51
Emi

Smiling is expressed as 'emi' (笑み) in Japanese.

There are various idiomatic expressions that use 'emi'.

'Emi wo ukaberu' (笑みを浮かべる - the literal meaning is "to float a smile")・・・To play a smile.

'Emi ga koboreru' (笑みがこぼれる - the literal meaning is "a smile spills")・・・To have a smile naturally.

'Man-men no emi' (満面の笑み)・・・A full smile.

'Kaishin no emi' (会心の笑み)・・・A smile with satisfaction.
笑み

「笑うこと」や「笑顔になること」を日本語で「笑み」と言います。

日本語には「笑み」を使った慣用表現が多く存在します。

「笑みを浮かべる」・・・笑顔になること。

「笑みがこぼれる」・・・思わず自然と笑顔になること。

「満面の笑み」・・・顔全体で作る笑顔。

「不敵な笑み」・・・何かを企んでいるような顔。

「会心の笑み」・・・心から満足したときに自然に出る笑顔。
No. 1 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
> I'm not sure what you mean with "to play a smile". Perhaps you mean just "to smile"?
Yes, I wanted to mean "to smile" or "to wear a smile."
Yalmar
Oh, then just "to smile at someone" is enough, or "to give a smile to someone"

Kiki Semaru (鬼気迫る - Serious/Ghastly)

Jun 27, 2019 11:14
Kiki Semaru

I sometimes see actors/actresses who have a face described as 'kiki semaru' (鬼気迫る) in movies and dramas.

'Kiki semaru' means that something is extremely serious or ghastly, and it is often attached to 'kao' (顔 - "face"), 'hyōjō' (表情 - "facial expression"), 'engi' (演技 - "performance"), or 'fun-iki' (雰囲気 - "atmosphere").

'Ki' (鬼) means "ogre," 'ki' (気) means "feeling" or "whiff," and 'semaru' (迫る) means "to approach," so the literal meaning of 'kiki semaru' is "a whiff of an ogre is approaching."

If you feel a creepy whiff of an ogre, your face and behavior will be very serious and ghastly.

This expression represents such seriousness.
鬼気迫る

映画やドラマの中で、役者はしばしば「鬼気迫る」表情をしています。

「鬼気迫る」は「恐ろしいほど真剣なさま」を意味する表現で、「顔」や「表情」、「演技」、「雰囲気」など修飾します。

「鬼」は "ogre"、「気」は "feeling/whiff "、「迫る」は "to approach" を意味するので、「鬼気迫る」の文字どおりの意味は "a whiff of an ogre is approaching" となります。

鬼の不気味な気配が近づくとき、あなたの顔や行為はきっと恐ろしく真剣なものになります。

「鬼気迫る」はそのような真剣さを表す言葉というわけです。
No. 1 Makita's correction
Your sentences are perfect. 頑張って!

Lol XD // Now I'm going to have to use this. (¬ ‿ ¬ )
Toru
Thank you for the correction and comment! (^^)
No. 2 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
Yalmar
No problem :)

Chawan (茶碗 - Bowl/Cup)

Jun 26, 2019 17:24
Chawan

Most Japanese people use 'chawan' (茶碗) every day.

Since 'cha' (茶) means "tea" and 'wan' (碗) means "bowl," the literal meaning of 'chawan' is "tea bowl."

In ancient times, 'chawan' literally meant a bowl for putting in and drinking tea, but it gradually came to mean various bowls (especially made of ceramics) for eating and drinking.

In our days, if you say just 'chawan', it usually refers to a bowl for eating rice.

If you want to mean 'tea bowl' explicitly, you can say 'yunomi dyawan' (湯のみ茶碗) or 'yunomi' (湯のみ); here 'yu' (湯) means "hot water" and 'nomi' (のみ) means "drinking."
茶碗

多くの日本人は毎日「茶碗」を使っています。

「茶」は "tea"、「碗」は "bowl" を意味するので、「茶碗」の文字どおりの意味は "bowl" です。

かつて「茶碗」は文字どおり、茶を飲むための碗を意味していましたが、次第に広く陶磁器製の碗を意味するようになりました。

現代では、単に「茶碗」と言った場合、ご飯をよそうための碗を指すことが多いです。

もし「茶を飲むためのお椀」を明示的に指したい場合は、「湯のみ茶碗」もしくは「湯のみ」と言うことができます。
No. 1 Raigetsu's correction
I like what you wrote, it was very informative. :D
No. 2 Makita's correction
In Japan, are all meals served in "Chawan"?
Toru
Thank you for the correction!

> In Japan, are all meals served in "Chawan"?
No, chawan is usually used to put rice, whereas other meals are put on 'sara' (皿 - "dish").
Makita
oh! interesting!
It's good to learn something new every day. Thank You ^^

Mi wo Ko ni Suru (身を粉にする - Working Hard)

Jun 25, 2019 09:54
Mi wo Ko ni Suru

I am working while 'mi wo ko ni suru/shite' (身を粉にする/して).

Since 'mi' (身) means "body" and 'ko/kona' (粉) means "powder," the literal meaning of 'mi wo ko ni suru' is "to grind one's body into powder."

This idiom expresses that someone works as hard as the body becomes powdery.

It is often used as 'mi wo ko ni shite hataraku' (身を粉にして働く "to work one's finger to the bone") by adding the verb 'hataraku' (働く - "to work").
身を粉にする

私は「身を粉にして」働いています。

「身」は "body"、「粉」は "powder" を意味するので、「身を粉にする」の文字どおりの意味は "to grind one's body into powder" です。

この慣用句は、身体が粉のようになるほど労力を惜しまず一生懸命に何かに取り組むさまを表しています。

"To work" を意味する「働く」をつけて、「身を粉にして働く」のように使われることが多いです。
No. 1 Yalmar's correction
This is a rather useful expression :)
Toru
Thank you always for correcting my post! :)
Yalmar
No problem! :)

Shiodoki (潮時 - Time/Chance)

Jun 24, 2019 22:38
Shiodoki

Everything has its 'shiodoki' (潮時).

'Shio' (潮) means "tide" abd 'doki/toki' (時) means "time," so the literal meaning of 'shiodoki' is "time when the tide comes in and goes out."

Originally, 'shiodoki' was used to its literal meaning among fishermen.

For the fishermen, such moments of high tide and low tide were one of the most important indicators to decide when to go out to sea.

Because of this, 'shiodoki' came to be widely used as a word that means the best time to start or finish something.

Incidentally, about 40% of Japanese people mistake the meaning of 'shiodoki' to be "time to quit/leave (in a negative sense)."
潮時

あらゆる物事には「潮時」があります。

「潮」は "tide"、「時」は "time" を意味するので、「潮時」の文字どおりの意味は "time when the tide comes in and goes out" となります。

もともと「潮時」は漁師の間で使われた言葉で、文字どおり「潮の満ち引きが起こる時間」を意味していました。

漁師にとって潮の満ち引きは、漁に出るタイミングを図る一つの指標になっていました。

このことから「潮時」は、「物事を始めたり終えたりするのにちょうど良い時期」を意味する言葉として広く使われるようになったというわけです。

ちなみに、約4割の日本人は「潮時」の意味を「引き際」と勘違いしているようです。
No. 1 nisha's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
No. 2 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for correcting me! (^^)
Yalmar
You're welcome! :)

Kenage (健気 - Admirable)

Jun 23, 2019 18:04
Kenage

I like people who have a character described as 'kenage' (健気).

'Kenage' means that someone has a good/solid attitude, or a vulnerable person (especially a child/woman) strives with difficulties.

'Kenage' is short for 'kenarige' (けなり気), which is combining 'kenari' (けなり) and 'ge/ke' (気); here 'kenari' is an old Japanese word meaning "different," and 'ge/ke' means "feeling."

Because of this, 'kenage' originally used to describe different or excellent people.

It came to have the above meanings deriving from that, and now it often means that a person strives with difficulties.
健気

私は「健気」な性格の人が好きです。

「健気」とは、心がけがよくしっかりしているさまや、力の弱いもの(子どもや女性)が困難に立ち向かうさまを表す言葉です。

「健気」はほかと異なることを意味する古語「けなり」に、"feeling" を意味する「気」がついた「けなり気」を省略したものです。

このため、もともと「健気」は人が優れているさまを表す言葉でした。

そこから派生して前述のような意味が生じ、現在では「力の弱いものが困難に立ち向かうさま」を意味することが多いです。
No. 1 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
Yalmar
You're welcome! :)
No. 2 Makita's correction
Nice ^ ^
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)

Gyū-tan (牛タン - Ox Tongue)

Jun 22, 2019 23:55
Gyū-tan

Today I went to a barbecue restaurant and ate many grilled meat with my best friend.

The food what we first ate was 'gyū-tan' (牛タン - "ox tongue").

I think that most Japanese people will first eat ox tongues when they go to a Japanese barbecue restaurant.

Since ox tongues have less fat and are not strongly seasoned, you can enjoy the taste the most when you eat it first.

In addition, it is often seasoned with only salt, so ox tongues do not contaminate a grill or iron plate; this is the other reason that people eat ox tongues first.
牛タン

私は今日、親友と焼き肉を食べに行きました。

最初に食べたのは「牛タン」です。

多くの日本人は、焼肉屋に行くと最初に「牛タン」を食べます。

タンは脂が少なく味付けも濃くないため、最初に食べるとその味を存分の楽しむことができます。

さらに、塩で味付けされることが多く、肉を焼く網を汚しにくいことも最初に食べる理由になっています。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
I want to try 牛タン! When I first heard of it, it sounded unusual (to me, a Westerner), but then I saw pictures of it and it looks delicious ^^ .
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
Yes, 牛タン is resilient and delicious! Please try it sometime (^^)
No. 2 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for correcting me again! (^^)
Yalmar
You're welcome. No problem :)
No. 3 Makita's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! (^^)

Demakase (でまかせ - Tall Tale)

Jun 21, 2019 10:35
Demakase

I sometimes see a person who say 'demakase' (でまかせ).

'Demakase' means to say something at random, to tell a tall tale, and such words themselves.

Here, 'de' (で) means "(to bring) out," and 'makase' (まかせ) means "to rely on someone" or "to let it go."

Because of this, 'demakse' implies words brought out on their own from one's mouth, and such words will be emotionless and nonsense.

Incidentally, another Japanese word 'dema' (でま) has the same meaning as 'demakase', but these etymologies are completely different.
でまかせ

私はときどき「でまかせ」を言う人を見かけます。

「でまかせ」とは、いい加減なことを言うことや、そのような言葉を意味します。

「で」は "out"、「まかせ」は "to rely on someone" や "to let it go" を意味します。

すなわち、「でまかせ」は「出るに任せて発した言葉」ということであり、そのような言葉は感情がこもっていなかったりでたらめだったりするというわけです。

ちなみに、「でまかせ」と同様の意味を持つ言葉に「でま」がありますが、語源は全く異なります。
No. 1 dec's correction
「でっち上げる」という言葉も類似な語幹であるのでしょうか。(出ちゃってあげるのような言い方で)
Toru
興味深いコメントをありがとうございます。:)
調べたところ、「でっち上げる」の「でっち」は "fabricated" を意味する「捏(でつ)」から来ているようです。
No. 2 elmin's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
No. 3 Makita's correction
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)
No. 4 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction and comments! (^^)
Yalmar
You're welcome :)
Toru
I'm sorry, but please let me write a supplementary explanation.
Previously, I learned that foreign languages (such as Japanese) should be written in italics, but we cannot use italics on Lang-8, so in my posts, I've used single quotes instead of italics for Japanese terms. When my posts on Lang-8 move to my blog, I remove the single quotes and use italics.
Yalmar
Oh, that sounds very efficient - you can then replace all the single quotes with italics :) You have a very nice blog! It would be nice if you also had some audio files to hear the correct pronunciation and intonation of your examples – perhaps one at normal speed and one at slow speed – but perhaps it's too much work :)
Toru
Thank you for the comment. :)
And thank you for your proposal! Indeed such audio files would be effective, but it might exceed my capacity limitation, haha.

Chinchin/Acchinchin/Chinchikochin (ちんちん/あっちんちん/ちんちこちん - Very Hot)

Jun 20, 2019 11:20
Chinchin/Acchinchin/Chinchikochin

I was born and brought up in Nagoya city, Aichi.

In Nagoya (and its surrounding areas), there are dialect words, 'chinchin' (ちんちん), 'acchinchin' (あっちんちん), and 'chinchikochin' (ちんちこちん), all of which means that water or something is very hot.

These terms come from the sound of a boiling kettle (or a jiggling lid of the boiling kettle).

In other words, these are something like onomatopoeia.

However, 'chinchin' (ちんちん) is also an infant word that means "penis," so please be careful when using them outside of specific areas.
ちんちん/あっちんちん/ちんちこちん

私は愛知県の名古屋で育ちました。

名古屋(および周辺の地域)には、湯などがとても熱いさまを意味する「ちんちん」「あっちんちん」「ちんちこちん」という方言があります。

これらの表現は、やかんの湯が沸騰したときの音(もしくは沸騰によって蓋が上下する音)から来ています。

すなわち擬音語のようなものです。

しかし、「ちんちん」は陰茎を意味する幼児語でもあるため、特定の地域以外で使う場合は注意が必要です。
No. 1 dec's correction
乾杯!
No. 2 demonhead's correction
最近、喉ちんこの単語を習いました。鳩はベトナム語で「チンポコ」と言います。
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
面白い単語を教えてくれてありがとうございます! :)

Te ni Ase wo Nigiru (手に汗を握る - Thrilling)

Jun 19, 2019 18:56
Te ni Ase wo Nigiri

Being excited or nervous by seeing/hearing a tense situation is called 'te ni ase wo nigiri' (手に汗を握る) in Japanese.

'Te' (手) means "hand," 'ase' (汗) means "sweat," and 'nigiri' (握る) means "to grasp," so the literal meaning of this idiom is "to grasp sweat one's hand."

People will sweat and clasp their hands when seeing/hearing a tense or dangerous situation.

This idiom literally represents such a situation.

Even if you do not clasp your hand or sweat, you can say 'te ni ase nigiru' to mean your excitement or tension.
手に汗を握る

事の成り行きが気になる緊迫した状況に見聞きし、興奮したり緊張したりすることを、「手に汗を握る」と言います。

「手」は "hand"、「汗」は "sweat"、「握る」は "to grasp" を意味するので、「手に汗を握る」の文字どおりの意味は "to grasp sweat one's hand" となります。

緊迫した状況や危険な状況を見聞きすると、人は手に汗をかき、さらに手を握りしめます。

この慣用句は、文字どおりそのような状況を表しているというわけです。

実際には手を握ったり汗をかいていなくても、興奮や緊張の意味で「手に汗を握る」と言うことができます。
No. 1 Makita's correction
lol ^ ^ It's very interesting to know where those phrases come from, and how each place has it's own.
Toru
Thank you so much always for checking my post! :)

Asedaku (汗だく - Sweaty)

Jun 18, 2019 23:00
Asedaku

In summer, I often become a state described as 'asedaku' (汗だく).

'Asedaku' means that much sweat bursts from someone's body.

'Ase' (汗) means "sweat," and 'daku' (だく) is short for an onomatopoeia 'dakudaku' (だくだく), which represents that blood or sweat streams continuously.

Incidentally, people who tend to sweat a lot are called 'asekkaki' (汗っかき); where 'kaki' (かき) means something like "producing."

[Example] 'Hashitte asedaku ni natta' (走って汗だくになった - "I drenched with sweat after running")
汗だく

夏、私はよく「汗だく」になります。

「汗だく」とは、たくさんの汗が流れるさまを表す言葉です。

「汗」は "sweat"、「だく」は血や汗などが続けて流れ出るさまを表す擬態語「だくだく」を省略したものです。

ちなみに、汗をよくかく人のことを「汗っかき」と言います。

【例文】走って汗だくになった。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good :)
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
No. 2 Makita's correction
Sounds funny.
in Spanish, we call it "Chivar"; in English "Drenched in sweat" ^ ^
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the new phrases! (^^)
No. 3 Yalmar's correction
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)
Yalmar
You're welcome! You're posts are always very interesting. I learn a little bit of Japanese every time.

Shoshi Kantetsu (初志貫徹 - Carrying out Your Original Intention)

Jun 17, 2019 22:05
Shoshi Kantetsu

Today I would like to introduce my favorite four-character idiom 'shoshi kantetsu' (初志貫徹).

'Sho' (初) means "first," 'shi' (志) means "will/motive," 'kan' (貫) means "consistent," and 'tetsu' (徹) means "thorough."

That is to say, 'shoshi kantetsu' literally means that you maintain your will consistently and thoroughly.

Basically, this idiom is used in a positive manner and is popular as a motto.

However, sometimes it could be more important to be flexible depending on the time and situation.

Incidentally, the kanji character 徹 can be read as Toru (my account name).
初志貫徹

今日は私の好きな四字熟語「初志貫徹」を紹介します。

「初」は "first"、「志」は "will/motive"、「貫」は "consistent"、「徹」は "thorough" を意味します。

すなわち、「初志貫徹」は文字どおり「初めに志したことを最後まで貫きとおすこと」を意味します。

基本的にこの言葉は良い意味で使われ、座右の銘としても人気があります。

しかし、時には状況に応じて臨機応変に対応する柔軟さも大事かもしれません。

ちなみに、「徹」という漢字は「とおる (Toru)」とも読みます。
No. 1 nisha's correction
"Shoshi Kantetsu" sounds like a great idiom to print on a t-shirt. Americans do that kind of thing all the time LOL. We taken Japanese and slap it on t-shirts, hoodies, and jackets. Sadly most non-Japanese Americans don't even know what it means.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, some foreigners wear clothes printed with funny kanji characters, haha.
No. 2 Makita's correction
Interesting ^ ^
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)

Oshare (おしゃれ - Smart/Chic/Fashionable) Part 2

Jun 16, 2019 22:17
Oshare Part 2

Yesterday, I talked about the Japanese term 'oshare' (おしゃれ), which means to dress up or apply makeup.

Just like the term 'omekasi' (おめかし - "dressing up") which was introduced two days ago, 'oshare' is used as 'oshare wo suru' (おしゃれをする) by combining the verb 'suru' (する - "do").

In addition, you can also use this term as an adjective, such as 'kanojo wa share da' (彼女はおしゃれだ - "she is chic") or 'oshare na mise' (おしゃれな店 - "a fashionable store").

Incidentally, note that if you say 'share' (しゃれ) by clipping the polite prefix 'o' (お), it often means "a play on words."
おしゃれ Part 2

昨日は「服用や身なりを美しく装うこと」を意味する「おしゃれ」について書きました。

「おしゃれ」は(二日前に紹介した)「おめかし」と同様、"do" を意味する「する」をつけて「おしゃれをする」のように使います。

また、「彼女はおしゃれだ」や「おしゃれな店」のように、形容詞として使うこともできます。

ちなみに、丁寧の接頭辞である「お」を省略して「しゃれ」とすると、「人を笑わせる語呂合わせなどの文句」を意味することが多いので注意して下さい。
No. 1 Makita's correction
Interesting ^ ^
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)
No. 2 Yalmar's correction
Toru
  • In addition, you can also use this term as an adjective, such as 'kanojo wa share da' (彼女はおしゃれだ - "she is chic") or 'oshare na mise' (おしゃれな店 - "a fashionable store").

    a fashion shop = a shop that sell fashion ~ o ~ a fashionable shop = a shop that is elegant and well designed, or a shop that is all the rage, where everybody wants to go, not necessarily a shop that sell clothes

Thank you for the correction and comment!
> a fashion shop = a shop that sell fashion ~ o ~ a fashionable shop = a shop that is elegant and well designed,
What I wanted to say is the latter (^^)
Yalmar
In that case you could also say, 'a trendy shop', if it is elegant and it has the latest trends

Oshare (おしゃれ - Smart/Fancy) Part 1

Jun 15, 2019 12:11
Oshare Part 1

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term 'omekashi' (おめかし), which means to dress up or do makeup.

This term is a little formal and diligent, but if you want to say it more casually, you can use the term 'oshare' (おしゃれ), which is often used for smart/fancy men, women, and things.

'O' (お) is a polite prefix, and 'share' (しゃれ) came from 'sare' (戯れ/され), which means to play a prank from a sense of fun.

This implies that people who have a sense of fun can afford to dress up or do makeup.

To be continued.
おしゃれ part 1

昨日は「身なりを飾り立てたり化粧をすること」を意味する「おめかし」という言葉を紹介しました。

「おめかし」よりもう少しカジュアルで、男女問わず(物に対しても)よく使われる表現に「おしゃれ」があります。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「しゃれ」は「遊び心からふざけること」を意味する「戯れ(され)」から来ています。

遊び心がある人は、服装や身なりなどを美しく装う余裕があるというわけです。

続く
No. 1 Yalmar's correction
It's very difficult to talk precisely about language! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Yes, it is really difficult for me to explain about the language.
> Do you mean dress up = put on a formal suit, perhaps a dinner jacket if you're a man or an evening gown if you're a woman? Or do you mean dress up in a costume, like in a fancy dress party?
I think that the former is closer to what I wanted to say. As you mentioned, 'oshare' perhaps can be translated as "elegant." In addition, according to the Internet dictionary, it has also meanings of "stylish," "fashionable," "classy," and "chic."
Yalmar
Oh, then it is quite correct. I would say things like, 'I got all dressed up for the gala dinner' to mean I was wearing a dinner jacket, or 'She was the only one who dressed up for our party' to mean that she was elegantly dressed while perhaps everybody else just wore normal clothes.
No. 2 V0's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Omekashi (おめかし - Dressing up)

Jun 14, 2019 20:40
Omekashi

Most women will do 'omekashi' (おめかし) when dating with their lovers or meeting someone they like.

'O' (お) is a polite prefix and 'mekashi' (めかし) means to dress up and do makeup.

In general, 'omekashi' is used to express that someone (especially a woman) dress up and do makeup with feeling, and it is used as 'omekashi wo suru' (おめかしをする) by combining the verb 'suru' (する - "do").

If you want to express that someone does a diligent 'omekashi' for a special event, you can say 'mekashikomu' (めかし込む) by using 'komu' (込む - "thorough").
おめかし

多くの女性は恋人とデートするときや好きな人と会うとき、「おめかし」をします。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞で、「めかす」は身なりを飾り立てたり整えることを意味します。

一般的に「おめかし」は「気合を入れて化粧をしたり着飾ること」を表し、"do" を意味する「する」と組み合わせて「おめかしをする」のように使われます。

特別な行事などで特に入念に「おめかし」をする場合は、徹底的であることを意味する「込む」と組み合わせて「めかし込む」と言います。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Mōtō-nai (毛頭ない - Least of All)

Jun 13, 2019 11:45
Mōtō-nai

When denying something strongly, we sometimes say 'mōtō-nai' (毛頭ない) by adding 'mōtō' (毛頭) to the negative term 'nai' (ない).

Since 'mō' (毛) means "hair" and 'tō' (頭) means "head," the literal meaning of 'mōtō-nai' is "there is no tip of a hair."

Here, "tip of a hair" implies a very small or slight thing.

You can also say 'ke-hodo mo nai' (毛ほどもない) instead of 'mōtō-nai' by using the terms 'ke' (毛 - "hair") and 'hodo' (ほど/程 - "degree").
毛頭ない

何かを強く否定したいとき、否定語の「ない/無い」に「毛頭」をつけて「毛頭ない」と言うことがあります。

「毛」は "hair"、「頭」は "head" を意味するので、「毛頭ない」の文字どおりの意味は「毛の先ほどもない」となります。

ここで「毛の先」は、何かがほんの少しであることを示唆しているというわけです。

"Degree" を表す「ほど」を使って「毛ほどもない」のように言うこともあります。
No. 1 dec's correction
ちょっともないのようの意味ですか。
Toru
はい、「少しもない」や「全くない」のような意味です。 :)
「ちょっともない」は、文法的には間違っていないかもしれませんが、このような言い方はほとんどしません(子どもっぽい表現に聞こえます)。
dec
子どもっぽいって、すみません。でも、なんとなく、「ありがとう」もふさわしいかも。
Toru
You're welcome!
謝る必要はありませんよ (^^)
dec
いやいや、自然な言葉遣いを教えていただき、本当に有り難うございます。
私の半分皮肉な返答を気にしないでください。実は、「ちょっとも」と「少しも」との間のニュアンスは初耳でした。実は謝りより感謝の礼でした。
No. 2 demonhead's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Ninin Sankyaku (二人三脚 - Cooperating with One Another)

Jun 13, 2019 08:10
Ninin Sankyaku

We say 'ninin sankyaku' (二人三脚) to describe that two people sharing the same purpose cooperate.

'Ni' (二) means "two," 'nin' (人) means "person," 'san' (三) means "three," and 'kyaku' (脚) means "leg," so the literal meaning of "ninin sankyaku" is "two people three legs."

This term was originally used to means a race that two participants run while strapping one runner's left leg and another runner's right leg ("three-legged race" in English).

Deriving from it, this term came to have the meaning of cooperating with one another.
二人三脚

誰かと二人で協力して物事に取り組むことを、「二人三脚」と表現することがあります。

「二」は "two"、「人」は "person"、「三」は "three"、「脚」は "leg" を意味するので、「二人三脚」の文字どおりの意味は "two people three legs" です。

この言葉はもともと、二人の隣り合った足首を結び、三本足のようにして走る競技を意味していました。

ここから派生して、二人で足並みを揃えて協力するという意味も持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Azalya's correction
I didn't know about this Japanese term. Now I know! great explanation
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Azalya
of course

Ome ni Kakaru (お目にかかる - Having the Pleasure of Meeting)

Jun 11, 2019 20:12
Ome ni Kakaru

The most common Japanese term meaning to meet someone is 'au' (会う).

However, if you want to show your respect, you can say 'ome ni kakaru' (お目にかかる) instead of 'au'.

'O' (お) is a polite prefix, 'me' (目) means "eye," and 'kakaru' (かかる) means "to be seen (by someone)," the literal meaning of 'ome ni kakaru' is "to be seen with your eyes."

For example, you can say 'ome ni kakarete kōei desu' (お目にかかれて光栄です - "I am honored to meet you") when meeting someone you respect.
お目にかかる

誰か会う・対面することを意味する日本語で最も一般的なものは「会う」です。

しかし、相手に対する敬意を表したい場合は、「お目にかかる」と言います。

「お」は丁寧の接頭辞、「目」は "eye"、「かかる」は "to be seen (by someone)" を意味するので、「お目にかかる」の文字どおりの意味は "to be seen with your eyes" となります。

例えば、尊敬する人に会うことができた際に「お目にかかれて光栄です」のように使います。
No. 1 Makita's correction
Very interesting, I hope to be able to use it one Day.

tohruさんありがとう。
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! (^^)
Makita
❤ ^ ^

Nisoku Sanmon (二束三文 - Dirt Cheap)

Jun 10, 2019 18:20
Nisoku Sanmon

Previously, I went to a secondhand bookstore to sell my books, but they became 'nisoku sanmon' (二束三文).

'Nisoku sanmon' is a four-character idiom meaning that a selling price is very low even if it is large in number.

'Ni' (二) means "two," 'soku' (束) means "bundle," 'san' (三) means "three," and 'mon' (文) is an old Japanese currency unit, the value today of which is about 30 yen (about $0.28), so the literal meaning of 'nisoku sanmon' is "30 yen for two bundles."

Here, 'soku' (束) can be written as 足, which represents a unit of footwear, and 'sanmon' is also used to represent a cheap thing.

Because of this, some people think that this idiom comes from the fact that two pair of Japanese sandals were sold very cheaply in the Edo period.
二束三文

私は以前、古本屋に本を売りに行ったことがありますが、「二束三文」にしかなりませんでした。

「二束三文」は、数が多くても売値が非常に安いことを意味する四字熟語です。

「二」は "two"、「束」は "bundle"、「三」は "three"、「文」は通貨単位で現在の約30円(約0.28ドル)であるため、「二束三文」の文字どおりの意味は "30 yen for two bundles" となります。

「束」は履物の単位である「足」と書くこともでき、「三文」は安いもののたとえでもあります。

このことから、この四字熟語は二足の履物がとても安く売られていたことに由来するとも考えられてます。
No. 1 Makita's correction
It was very interesting to read your post.
I didn't know the existing of that particular Idiom. Thank you ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post again! (^^)
Makita
You're welcome

Shiri ga Karui (尻が軽い - Hasty)

Jun 10, 2019 18:19
Shiri ga Karui

I do not like people who are described as 'shiri ga karui' (尻が軽い).

'Shiri ga karui' means that someone's behavior is thoughtless or hasty; especially it is used to describe women who often play around.

Since 'shiri' (尻) means "hip" and 'karui' (軽い) means "light," the literal meaning of 'shiri ga karui' is "one's hip is light."

It is difficult for people having a light hip to sit still in one place, so this idiom came to have the above meanings.

You can say 'shirigaru' (尻軽) by shortening 'shiri ga karui'.
尻が軽い

私は「尻が軽い」人があまり好きではありません。

「尻が軽い」は、行いが軽々しいことや軽はずみであることを意味する言葉で、特に浮気性な女性に対して使われることが多いです。

「尻」は "hip"、「軽い」は "light" を意味するので、「尻が軽い」の文字どおりの意味は "one's hip is light" となります。

尻が軽くて一つの場所にじっと座っていられないことから、上記のような意味を持つようになったというわけです。

「尻が軽い」を省略して「尻軽」と言うこともあります。
No. 1 Makita's correction
^^
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! (^^)
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
> I think "hip" is "腸骨(のあたり)" right?
Probably you're right. :)
I think 'shiri' can also be translated as "buttock."

Aruki Sumaho (歩きスマホ - Smartphone Zombie)

Jun 8, 2019 21:57
Aruki Sumaho

In accordance with the prevalence of smartphones, 'aruki sumaho' (歩きスマホ) has become a big problem in the world.

Since 'aruki' (歩き) means "walking," and 'sumaho' (スマホ) is short for 'sumātofon' (スマートフォン - "smartphone"), 'aruki sumaho' literally means "to use a smartphone while walking."

The use of smartphones while walking makes you have a very narrow view of things, so it is extremely dangerous

In the US, such people using smartphones while walking are called "smartphone zombie," because they walk slowly without worrying about surroundings.
歩きスマホ

スマートフォンの普及に伴い、全世界で「歩きスマホ」が問題となっています。

「歩き」は "walking"、「スマホ」は "smartphone" を意味する「スマートフォン」を省略したもので、「歩きスマホ」は文字どおり「歩きながらスマートフォンを操作すること」を意味します。

歩きながらスマートフォンを操作すると、視野が著しく狭くなるため、非常に危険です。

アメリカでは、周囲を気にせずゆっくりと歩くさまから「スマートフォンゾンビ」と呼ばれているようです。
No. 1 Makita's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)
Makita
You're welcome : )
No. 2 Makita's correction
Yeah, it's very dangerous. Sadly a lot of people don´t realize that.

Tōge wo Kosu (峠を越す - Getting over the Hump)

Jun 7, 2019 14:29
Tōge wo Kosu

Three days ago, I introduced the Japanese word 'tōge' (峠), which means 'mountain pass."

There is an idiom that uses this word -- it is 'tōge wo kosu' (峠を越す).

Since 'kosu' (越す) means "over," the literal meaning of 'tōge wo kosu' is "(cross) over a mountain pass."

Of course, this idiom can be used to express its literal meaning.

In addition, since 'tōge' implies a crisis, 'tōge wo kosu' can also mean to get over or pass a crisis term/status/situation.

You can translate it into English as "get over the hump."
峠を越す

三日前、私は "mountain pass" を意味する「峠」という言葉を紹介しました。

「峠」を使った慣用句に、「峠を越す」があります。

「越す」は "over" を意味するので、「峠を越す」の文字どおりの意味は "over a mountain pass" となります。

この慣用句は、もちろん文字どおりの意味を表すこともあります。

加えて、「峠」は危険な状況を示唆することから、「峠を越す」は危険な時期や状態を乗り越えることも意味します。
No. 1 dec's correction
dec
You can also refer to the 峠 indirectly with the expression "it's all downhill from here," which means that the difficult part is behind you.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know that!
I learned something new! :)

Heibon (平凡 - Ordinary)

Jun 6, 2019 20:58
Heibon

To describe that someone/something is ordinary and insipid, you can use the Japanese word 'heibon' (平凡).

Both 'hei' (平) and 'bon' (凡) mean that something is ordinary.

That is to say, 'heibon' is a word made by combining two characters that have the same meaning.

If you want to emphasize that something is not special, you can say 'heihei bonbon' (平平凡凡/平々凡々) by repeating themselves.

Incidentally, the antonym of 'heibon' is 'hibon' (非凡 - "extraordinary"); here the 'hi' (非) is a negative word.
平凡

特に優れた点もなく並なことを「平凡」と言います。

「平」も「凡」も、何かが並であることや、あたりまえであることを意味します。

すなわち「平凡」は、似た意味の漢字を合成して作られた語というわけです。

平凡であることを強調したい場合は、「平平凡凡」「平々凡々」のように言います。

ちなみに、「平凡」の対義語は「非凡」で、何かが特に優れていることを意味します。
No. 1 Aitherguard's correction
excellent journal entry. Your topic was very interesting. Keep up the good work practicing English.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that! (^^)
Aitherguard
You're welcome, I am happy that I was able to help you. =)
No. 2 sjstrauss's correction
Interesting; 平凡 is a word I only recently learned, but I didn't know it had that sort of negative nuance. I don't know that I ever would have used it over something like 普段, but that is still good to know ^^; .
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, please do not use 平凡 to someone in front of you. :)

Haiboku (敗北 - Losing)

Jun 5, 2019 17:23
Haiboku

Losing or running away after the defeat is called 'haiboku' (敗北) in Japanese.

'Hai' (敗) means "losing," and 'boku/hoku' (北) usually means "north," but here it means "turning around and running away."

The kanji character 北 can be divided into two parts; the left side and the right side.

Since these two parts represent persons respectively, the kanji 北 represents two people who are turning against one another and running away.

[Example] 'Kare wa senkyo de haiboku shita' (彼は選挙で敗北した - He lost the election).
敗北

戦いに負けることや、負けて逃げることを日本語で「敗北」と言います。

「敗」は "losing" を、「北」は通常 "north" を意味しますが、ここでは「背を向けて逃げる」を意味します。

「北」という漢字は、左側と右側の二つの部分に分けることができます。

この二つの部分はそれぞれ人を表しており、「北」という字は二人の人が背を向けて逃げているさまを表しているというわけです。

【例文】彼は選挙で敗北した。
No. 1 Viji's correction
Very interesting and nicely explained, Toru :)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
Viji
You're welcome :)

Tōge (峠 - Mountain Pass)

Jun 4, 2019 19:20
Tōge

Mountain passes or boundaries between up and down ways are called 'tōge' (峠).

It is said that 'tōge' comes from 'tamuke' (手向け), which means to offer things to Shinto and Buddhist deities -- there was the fact that visitors offered things to dōsojin (道祖神 - "ancestor kami protecting the safety of roads").

Incidentally, 峠 is the kanji invented in Japan.

This kanji consists of three parts; 山 meaning "mountain," 上 meaning "up" and 下 meaning "down."

The reason why this kanji was made in Japan might be that the Japanese had the environment surrounded by mountains.


山の上りと下りの境界のことを、日本語で「峠」と言います。

「峠」は神仏に物を供えることを意味する「手向け(たむけ)」から来ており、旅行者が道祖神(道の安全を守る神)に手向けたことに由来すると考えられています。

ちなみに、漢字「峠」は和製漢字です。

"Mountain" を意味する「山」、"up" を意味する「上」、そして "down" を意味する「下」で構成されます。

このような漢字が生まれたのは、日本が山に囲まれていたためかもしれません。
No. 1 Aitherguard's correction
Excellent journal entry. Please keep up the good work practicing English.
Toru
Thank you very much for the corrections and helpful comments! (^^)

Mune wo Fukuramaseru (胸をふくらませる - Full of Hope)

Jun 3, 2019 15:40
Mune wo Fukuramaseru

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese expression 'mune wo haru' (胸を張る).

The literal meaning of 'mune wo haru' is "to stretch one's chest," but it actually expresses someone's confident, imposing or proud attitude.

To express the same meaning as this in English, you can say "to puff one's chest up."

On the other hand, the literal translation of "to puff one's chest up" into Japanese is 'mune wo fukuramaseru' (胸をふくらませる), and this Japanese expression means that someone is full of joy and hope.
胸をふくらませる

昨日は「胸を張る」という日本語を紹介しました。

「胸を張る」の文字どおりの意味は "to stretch one's chest" で、実際には「自信に満ちた態度や堂々とした態度、得意げな態度」を表します。

同じ意味を表すために、英語では「膨らませる」を意味する "to puff up" を用いて、"to puff one's chest up" と言うことができます。

一方で、"to puff one's chest up" を日本語に直訳すると「胸をふくらませる」であり、この表現は「期待や喜びに満ち溢れる」ことを意味します。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Mune wo Haru (胸を張る - Sticking One's Chest out)

Jun 2, 2019 12:08
Mune wo Haru

Yesterday, I did an action called 'mune wo haru' (胸を張る).

Since 'mune' (胸) means "chest" and 'haru' (張る) means "to stretch," the literal meaning of 'mune wo haru' (胸を張る) is "to stretch one's chest."

As you can guess easily, this idiom expresses someone's confident, imposing or proud attitude.

In English, you can say it as "to stick one's chest out" or "to throw one's chest out."

I am not sure about that, but such actions of human beings might be global common.
胸を張る

私は昨日、「胸を張りました」。

「胸」は "chest"、「張る」は "to stretch" を意味するので、「胸を張る」の文字どおりの意味は "to stretch one's chest" となります。

容易に想像できるかもしれませんが、この慣用句は自信に満ちた態度や堂々とした態度、得意げな態度を表します。

英語では "to stick one's chest out" や "to throw one's chest out" のように言うことができます。

そのような態度をとるときに胸を張るのは、世界共通なのかもしれません。
No. 1 icaco's correction
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)
icaco
どう致しまして。 (You are welcome!)

Sudōfu (酢豆腐 - Know-it-all)

Jun 1, 2019 22:21
Sudōfu

Young people these days do not use it very much, but there is a Japanese term, 'sudōfu' (酢豆腐), which means a person who shows a know-it-all attitude.

Since 'su' (酢) means "vinegar" and 'dōfu/tōfu' (豆腐) means "bean curd," the literal meaning of 'sudōfu' is "vinegared bean curd."

This term comes from a 'rakugo' (落語 - "traditional Japanese comic storytelling") in the Edo period.

The story of the 'rakugo' is something as follows; a man who showed a know-it-all attitude ate rotten and sour bean curd then said "this is vinegared bean curd."
酢豆腐

最近の若者はほとんど使いませんが、知ったかぶりをする人を意味する「酢豆腐」という日本語があります。

「酢」は "vinegar"、「豆腐」は "bean curd" を意味するので、「酢豆腐」の文字どおりの意味は vinegared bean curd"" となります。

この言葉は、江戸時代の落語から生まれました。

その落語は、知ったかぶりの若旦那が腐って酸っぱくなった豆腐を食べさせられ、「これは酢豆腐だ」と知ったかぶりをする内容となっています。
No. 1 HD123's correction
That's an interesting and funny expression.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Shizentai (自然体 - Being Oneself)

May 31, 2019 22:02
Shizentai

I might not be good at being 'shizentai' (自然体).

Since 'shizen' (自然) means "natural" and 'tai' (体) means "body" or "posture," the literal meaning of 'shizentai' is "natural body" or "natural posture."

Originally, this term was used to mean a basic standing posture/stance in 'jūdō' (柔道 - "the Japanese art of self-defense") or 'kendō' (剣道 - "the Japanese art of fencing").

Later, it came to have the meaning of a natural attitude with no pressure or tension.

This term can be translated into English as "being oneself."
自然体

私は「自然体」でいるのが苦手な人間かもしれません。

「自然」は "natural"、「体」は "body/posture" を意味するので、「自然体」の文字どおりの意味は "natural body/posture" となります。

もともとこの言葉は、柔道や剣道においてからだの力を抜いて立つ基本姿勢を指した言葉でした。

後に、気負いや緊張のない、自然な態度を表すようにもなったというわけです。

英語では "being oneself" のように言うことができます。
No. 1 Oceanier's correction
That's really interesting.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Shitasaki Sanzun (舌先三寸 - Glib Tongue) Part 1

May 30, 2019 18:18
Shitasaki Sanzun

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'shitasaki sanzun' (舌先三寸), which describes people who persuade someone only with their big mouths and smooth talk.

The literal meaning of this term is "one's tip of the tongue is about 9 cm," but there are two major theories about the reason for coming to have the above meaning.

One theory says that 'sanzun' (三寸 - "about 9 cm") is a word representing that something is very short, and 'shitasaki sanzun' implies that it is hard to say hearty words because of the short tongue.

The other theory says that 'shitasaki' (舌先 - "the tip of a tongue") implies someone's words, and 'shitasaki sanzun' implies that someone's words are shallow.
舌先三寸 Part 2

昨日は、「うわべだけの巧みな言葉で相手をあしらう人」を表す「舌先三寸」という言葉を紹介しました。

「舌先三寸」の文字どおりの意味は "one's tip of the tongue is about 9 cm" ですが、上記のような意味を持つようになった理由として大きく次の二つの説があります。

一つは、「三寸」が何かがとても短いことをたとえた言葉で、「舌先三寸」は「舌が短く心のこもった言葉を発せられない」ことを表しているという説です。

もう一つは、「舌先」が発する言葉を表しており、「舌先三寸」は「話す内容が薄い」ことを表しているという説です。

Shitasaki Sanzun (舌先三寸 - Glib Tongue) Part 1

May 29, 2019 10:53
Shitasaki Sanzun Part 1

There are people who persuade someone only with their big mouths and smooth talk.

Such people can be described as 'shitasaki sanzun' (舌先三寸) in Japanese.

'Shita' (舌) means "tongue," 'saki' (先) means "tip," 'san' (三) means "three" and 'zun/sun' (寸) is a unit of length representing about 3 cm, so the literal meaning of 'shitasaki sanzun' is "one's tip of the tongue is about 9 cm."

You might think that the tongue tip with a length of about 9 cm is long.

There are two major theories about the etymology of this term.

To be continued.
舌先三寸 Part 1

世の中には、うわべだけの巧みな言葉で相手をあしらう人がいます。

そのような人のことを、「舌先三寸」と言います。

「舌」は "tongue"、「先」は "tip"、「三」は "three"、「寸」は約3cmを表す距離の単位を意味するので、「舌先三寸」の文字どおりの意味は "one's tip of the tongue is about 9 cm" となります。

舌の先が約9cmなんて、長いと感じるかもしれません。

この言葉の語源には、大きく二つの説があります。

続く。

Tenohira Kurū (テノヒラクルー - Turning a 180)

May 28, 2019 23:39
Tenohira Kurū

YesterdayYesterday, I introduced the Japanese idiom 'tenohira wo kaesu' (手のひらを返す), which means to make a 180-degree turn in attitude or wording.

On the Internet, it is sometimes expressed as 'tenohira kurū' (テノヒラクルー).

'Tenohira' (テノヒラ/手のひら) means "palm" and 'kurū' (クルー) is an onomatopoeia that represents that something rotates.

Since 'karsu' (返す) means "to turn something over," both literal meanings of 'tenohira wo kaesu' and 'tenohira kuru' are the same.

This slang term is often used with a parenthesis such as "(テノヒラクルー" at the end of the sentence.
テノヒラクルー

昨日は、態度や言葉遣いをがらりと変えることを意味する「手のひらを返す」という慣用句を紹介しました。

これを一部のインターネット上では、「テノヒラクルー」と表すことがあります。

「テノヒラ」は "palm" を意味する「手のひら」をカタカナで書いたもの、「クルー」は何かが回転していることを表す擬態語です。

「返す」は "to turn something over" を意味するので、「手のひらを返す」と「テノヒラクルー」の文字どおりの意味はどちらも同じというわけです。

態度を大きく変えた発言をした後に、括弧をつけて「(テノヒラクルー」のように使われます。

Tenohira wo Kaesu (手のひらを返す - Turning a 180)

May 27, 2019 20:10
Tenohira wo Kaesu

I often find people who do an act called 'tenohira wo kaesu' (手のひらを返す).

Since 'tenohira' (手のひら/掌) means "palm" and 'kaesu' (返す) means "to turn something over," the literal meaning of 'tenohira wo kaesu' is "to turn over one's palm."

Actually, this idiom means to make a 180-degree turn in attitude or wording because of some events.

Originally, it was used to mean that something is easy to change, but later, this came to be used to indicate human's behavior.
手のひらを返す

私はインターネット上で、よく「手のひらを返す」人を見かけます。

「手のひら」は "palm"、「返す」は "to turn something over" を意味するので、「手のひらを返す」の文字どおりの意味は "to turn one's palm over" となります。

実際には、何かをきっかけに態度や言葉遣いががらりと変わることを意味します。

もともとは「物事が容易に変化すること」を意味する言葉でしたが、これが人間の態度などに使われるようになったというわけです。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
Interesting, and a fitting phrase.
sjstrauss
To describe the 180, I mean :) .
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)
No. 2 Judy's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Aiso Warai (愛想笑い - Fake Smile)

May 26, 2019 17:15
Aiso Warai

I am not good at doing 'aiso warai' (愛想笑い).

'Aiso warai' is a diplomatic smile to get on someone's good side.

'Aiso' (愛想) is an attitude when dealing with someone or an affable attitude, and 'warai' (笑い) means "laugh" or "smile," so the literal meaning of 'aiso warai' is "an affable smile."

There are various opinions as to whether 'aiso warai' (fake smile) is good or bad for human relationships.

In my opinion, people who have the ability to make 'aiso warai' well can smooth human relations.
愛想笑い

私は「愛想笑い」が得意ではありません。

「愛想笑い」とは、人の機嫌を取るための笑いのことです。

「愛想」は「人に接するときの態度」や「人当たりの良い態度」を、「笑い」は "laugh" を意味するので、「愛想笑い」の文字どおりの意味は "" となります。

「愛想笑い」が良いか悪いかについてはさまざまな考えがあります。

個人的には、うまく愛想笑いができる人は、人間関係を円滑にできる人だと思います。
No. 1 demonhead's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Laugh Ways of Ha-gyō

May 25, 2019 21:26
Laugh Ways of Ha-gyō

In Japan, many laugh ways are represented by 'ha-gyō' (ハ行).

'Ha-gyō' (ハ行 - literally means "ha row") contains 'ha' (ハ), 'hi' (ヒ), 'fu' (フ), 'he' (ヘ) and 'ho' (ホ), and you can generate a laugh sound by repeating one of them.

'Hahaha' (ハハハ) ・・・ A common laugh (for many countries).

'Hihihi' (ヒヒヒ) ・・・ A laugh in a contemptible tone of voice.

'Fufufu' (フフフ) ・・・ A creepy laugh or woman's pretty laugh.

'Hehehe' (ヘヘヘ) ・・・ A embarrassed laugh.

'Hohoho' (ホホホ) ・・・ A pompous laugh.

In actual conversation, 'hahaha' or 'ahaha' (アハハ) is most commonly used.
ハ行の笑い方

日本では、笑いの多くは「ハ行」で表されます。

「ハ行」には「ハ」「ヒ」「フ」「ヘ」「ホ」があり、それぞれを二~三回繰り返すだけで笑いの音になります。

「ハハハ」・・・一般的な笑い

「ヒヒヒ」・・・人を馬鹿にしたような笑い

「フフフ」・・・不敵な笑い or 女性の可愛らしい笑い

「へへへ」・・・照れ笑い

「ホホホ」・・・気取った笑い

実際の会話では、「ハハハ」が最もよく使われます。
No. 1 dec's correction
Very funny. I didn't know what ハ行 was until the line where you explained it. その咄嗟に、ピンと来ました。
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!

> maybe "boastful" is more accurate?
ホホホ is often used as a laughing style of royal people (especially women). I'm not sure but I think that "boastful" is a little different. Maybe I should have said "royal laugh."

Kokoro Machi (心待ち - Being Eagerly Waiting)

May 24, 2019 21:12
Kokoro Machi

Have you ever been eagerly waiting for something?

To describe such a situation, you can use the Japanese term 'kokoro machi' (心待ち).

Since 'kokoro' (心) means "heart" and 'mati' (待ち) means "to wait," the combination 'kokoro machi' literally means "to wait something heartily."

In actual situations, it is often used as 'kokoro machi ni suru' (心待ちにする) by combining with 'suru' (する - "do").

[Example] 'Kanojo to au no wo kokoro machi ni suru' (彼女と会うのを心待ちにする - "I look forward to meeting my girlfriend").
心待ち

心から何かを待ち望んだことはありますか?

そのようなことを表すとき、「心待ち」という日本語を使うことがあります。

「心」は "heart"、「待ち」は "to wait" を意味するので、「心待ち」は "to wait something heartly" という意味になります。

実際には、"do" を意味する「する」と組み合わせて、「心待ちにする」のように使います。

【例文】彼女と会うのと心待ちにする。
No. 1 Chris's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Hinemosu (ひねもす - Whole Day)

May 24, 2019 20:28
Hinemosu

Yesterday, I introduced the classical Japanese term 'yo mo sugara' (夜もすがら), which means "all through the night."

The antonym of this term is 'hinemosu' (ひねもす).

'Hinemosu' comes from 'hi mo sugara' (ひもすがら) -- 'Hi' (ひ/日) means "day" and 'sugara' (すがら) means "from start to end."

That is to say, 'hinemosu' and 'hi mo sugara' means "all day" or "whole day."

As well as you can write 'yo mo sugara' in kanji as 終夜 (終 means "end"), you can write 'hinemosu/hi mo sugara' as 終日.

However, note that the common reading of 終日 is 'shūjitsu'.
ひねもす

昨日は、"all through the night" を意味する「夜もすがら」という大和言葉を紹介しました。

「夜もすがら」の対義語は、「ひねもす」です。

「ひねもす」は「ひもすがら」から来ており、「ひ」は "day"、「すがら」は "from start to end" を意味します。

すなわち「ひねもす」および「ひもすがら」は、"all day" や "whole day" を意味するというわけです。

「夜もすがら」が "end" を意味する漢字「終」を用いて「終夜」と書けたように、「ひねもす」「ひもすがら」も「終日」と書くことができます。

しかし、「終日」は「しゅうじつ」と読むのが一般的です。
No. 1 Eric's correction
Thanks for sharing!
Toru
Thank you very much for the correction! (^^)

Yo mo Sugara (夜もすがら - Through the Night)

May 22, 2019 22:05
Yo mo Sugara

Today I would like to introduce one of the classical Japanese terms that has a beautiful sound, 'yo mo sugara' (夜もすがら).

'Yo' (夜) is a noun that means "night," and 'sugara' (すがら) is a suffix that means "from start to end."

That is to say, 'yo mo sugara' means "all through the night" or "overnight."

You can also write this term in kanji as 終夜 by using 終, which means "end."

[Example] 'Yo mo sugara benkyō shita' (夜もすがら勉強した - "I studied all through the night").
夜もすがら

今日は、美しい響きを持つ大和言葉の一つ「夜もすがら」を紹介します。

「夜」は "night" を意味する名詞、「すがら」は「始めから終わりまでずっと」を意味する接尾語です。

すなわち「夜もすがら」は、「一晩中」「夜が明けるまで」を意味するというわけです。

「夜もすがら」は、"end" を意味する漢字「終」と組み合わせて「終夜」と書くこともできます。

【例文】夜もすがら勉強した。

Sobazue wo Kū (側杖を食う - Becoming Embroiled)

May 21, 2019 19:36
Sobazue wo Kū

Yesterday, I introduced the Japanese word 'tobacchiri' (とばっちり), which means to become embroiled in something.

There is another phrase that has a similar meaning to 'tobacchiri' -- it is 'sobazue wo kū' (側杖を食う).

'Soba' (側) means "nearby" and 'zue/tsue' (杖) means "cane."

In addition, 'kū' (食う) usually means "to eat," but here it means that you receive/incur something, so the literal meaning of 'sobazue wo kū' is "to receive/incur a nearby cane."

This phrase implies that if you are near people who are fighting using a cane, you will be hit wit the cane.
側杖を食う

昨日は "" を意味する「とばっちり」という日本語を紹介しました。

とばっちりと同様に、自分とは無関係のことで思わぬ災難に遭うことを意味する表現として、「側杖を食う」があります。

「側」は "nearby"、「杖」は "cane" を意味します。

また、「食う」は通常 "to eat" を意味しますが、ここでは被害を受けるという意味であるため、「側杖を食う」の文字どおりの意味は "to receive/incur a nearby cane" となります。

杖を使って喧嘩をしている人の側にいると、その杖に当たってしまうことから、上記のような意味をもつようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Richard 's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Tobacchiri (とばっちり - By-Blow)

May 20, 2019 14:05
Tobacchiri

Have you ever been involved in an irrelevant accident caused by someone?

Such an event is described as 'tobacchiri' (とばっちり) in Japanese.

This term comes from an old Japanese verb, 'tobashiru' (とばしる), which means that water is splattered or someone is splashed with water.

In fact, 'tobasshiri' also has the meaning of splattered water.

That is to say, this term compares receiving splattered water with involving in an irrelevant accident.

In actual situations, it is used something like 'tobacchiri wo ukeru' (とばっちりを受ける) by combining with 'ukeru' (受ける - "to receive").
とばっちり

他人が引き起こした災難に巻き込まれたことはありますか?

そのようなことを日本語で「とばっちり」と言います。

この言葉は、水が勢いよく飛び散ることや、飛び散る水しぶきを受けることを意味する古語「とばしる」が変化したものです。

実際、「とばっちり」には「水が飛び散るさま」という意味もあります。

誰かが飛ばした水しぶきを受けることから、現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。

"To receive" を意味する「受ける」と組み合わせて、「とばっちりを受ける」のように使います。
No. 1 Juan K's correction
Your entry has correct grammar. I haven't heard the term 'irrelevant accident' in English before.
Toru
Thank you so much for the comment!
Actually, since I just used/created the term "irrelevant accident" based on the meaning of each word, it may need to be rephrased.
Juan K
I see. 'Petty incident' is one suggestion.
No. 2 Kento's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Zaisu (座椅子 - Legless Chair)

May 19, 2019 19:22
Zaisu

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese word 'isu' (椅子), which means "chair."

Chairs are one of the most common furniture that has been used all over the world since ancient times.

Of course, there have been chairs also in Japan, but Japanese people generally sat on the floor (tatami mat) in their houses, so 'zaisu' (座椅子) was born.

Since 'za' (座) means "sit" and 'isu' (椅子) means "chair," the literal meaning of 'zaisu' is "sitting chair."

Actually, it represents a legless chair only with a backrest (or a backrest and an armrest).
座椅子

昨日は "chair" を意味する「椅子」という日本語を紹介しました。

椅子は古くから世界中で使われてきた家具の一つです。

日本でも椅子は使われてきましたが、屋内では一般的に床に座る生活をしてきたため、「座椅子」が生み出されました。

「座」は "sit"、「椅子」は "chair" を意味するので、「座椅子」の文字どおりの意味は "sitting chair" となります。

実際には、脚がなくて背もたれのみ(もしくは背もたれと肘掛け)の椅子を表します。
No. 1 demonhead's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Isu (椅子 - Chair)

May 18, 2019 22:35
Isu

Yesterday, I introduced the Japanese 'koshikake' (腰掛け), which means "chair" or "makeshift job."

However, when you want to mean "chair," it is more common to use another word, 'isu' (椅子).

椅 is a kanji that means a thing or wood to lean on, and 'su' (子) is a suffix attached to small things.

It is thought that this comes from the fact that most chairs in the past in Japan (or China) were made of wood.

The chair has a long history -- it is said that the oldest chair in the world is the chair of Queen Hetepheres used in ancient Egypt (about 2500 BC).
椅子

昨日は「腰掛け」という言葉を紹介しました。

しかし、"Chair" を意味したい場合は、「椅子」という言葉のほうがより一般的に利用されます。

「椅」は「寄りかかるもの」や「寄りかかる木」を意味する漢字、「子」は小さいものにつける接尾語です。

これは、かつて日本(もしくは中国)の多くの木製であったということに由来すると考えられます。

椅子の歴史は古く、現存する世界最古の椅子は古代エジプト(紀元前約2500年)のへテプへレス王妃の椅子だと言われています。
No. 1 Oceansea's correction
Toru
Thank you very much always for correcting me! :)
Oceansea
You are welcome!
No. 2 sjstrauss's correction
I hadn't researched it, but I always wondered about the 子 in this word, and how it related to the meaning. Your explanation makes sense, though ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)
sjstrauss
No problem ^^

Koshikake (腰掛け - Chair/Makeshift Job)

May 17, 2019 18:41
Koshikake

People often use 'koshikake' (腰掛け) when getting tired from walking or standing.

'Koshi' (腰) means "lower back," and 'kake' (掛け) has various meanings, but here it means "to place," so the literal meaning of 'koshikake' is "something for placing one's lower back."

Of course, it literally means the furniture for placing one's lower back and resting -- that is, it is a chair.

On the other hand, it can also mean that someone temporarily assumes a position only until getting their desired position or job.

The latter meaning is often used for female employees who intend to quit the job and become housewives when getting married.
腰掛け

歩くことや立つことに疲れたら、よく「腰掛け」を使います。

「腰」は "lower back"、「掛け」は "to place" を意味するので、「腰掛け」の文字どおりの意味は "something for placing one's lower back" となります。

もちろん、文字どおり腰を掛けて休む台、すなわち「椅子」を意味することも多いです。

一方で、目指す地位や職に達するまでの間、一時的に別の地位や職に就くことを指して「腰掛け」と言うこともあります。

後者の意味での「腰掛け」は、結婚したら会社を辞めて専業主婦になるつもりの女性社会人に対して使われることが多いです。
No. 1 Oceansea's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Koshi ga Hikui (腰が低い - Humble)

May 16, 2019 10:32
Koshi ga Hikui

I am sometimes told 'koshi ga hikui' (腰が低い).

Since 'koshi' (腰) means "low back" or "waist" and 'hikui' (低い) means "low," the literal meaning of 'koshi ga hikui' is "one's low back is low."

In actual conversation, this phrase is used to mean that someone is humble or modest.

You can also say 'teishisei' (低姿勢), by combining 'tei' (低 - "low") and 'shisei' (姿勢 - "posture").

Incidentally, if you say 'koshi ga takai' (腰が高い) by using 'takai' (高い - "high") instead of 'hikui', you can mean that someone is arrogant, but this phrase is not often used.
腰が低い

私はたまに「腰が低い」と言われます。

「腰」は "low back" や "waist"、「低い」は "low" を意味するので、「腰が低い」の文字どおりの意味は "one's low back is low" となります。

実際には、「他人に対してへりくだっている」や「謙虚」であることを意味する際に用いられます。

"Low" を意味する「低」と "posture" を意味する「姿勢」を組み合わせて、「低姿勢」と言うこともあります。

ちなみに、 横柄であることを意味するために "high" を意味する「高い」を使って「腰が高い」言うこともできますが、この表現はあまり使われません。
No. 1 bennatan's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Kenka-goshi and Yowa-goshi (喧嘩腰と弱腰 - Defiant Attitude and Bearish Attitude)

May 15, 2019 23:27
Kengka-goshi and Yowa-goshi

In my post yesterday, I used the Japanese term 'kenka-goshi' (喧嘩腰), which means an attitude that you are about to start a fight/quarrel.

Since 'kenka' means "fight/quarrel" and 'goshi/koshi' (腰) means "waist," the literal meaning of 'kenkagoshi' is "a fight waist."

This is because the waist portion looks characteristics when getting ready for a fight.

Contrary to 'kenka-goshi', there is another term 'yowa-gosi' (弱腰), which means a bearish or negative attitude.

Since 'yowa' (弱) means "weak," the literal meaning of 'yowa-goshi' is "a weak waist."
喧嘩腰と弱腰

昨日の投稿の中で、私は喧嘩をはじめようとする態度を意味する「喧嘩腰」という言葉を用いました。

「喧嘩」は "fight/quarrel"、「腰」は "waist" を意味するので、「喧嘩腰」の文字どおりの意味は "a fight waist" となります。

これは、喧嘩をしかけようと身構えるとき、腰に特徴が見られるためであると考えられます。

また「喧嘩腰」とは逆に、弱気な態度や消極的な態度を表す言葉に「弱腰」があります。

「弱」は "weak" を意味するので、「弱腰」の文字どおりの意味は "a weak waist" となります。
No. 1 farrah's correction
Wow, that was a very interesting read! I love the etymology behind Japanese words and kanji.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Uri Kotoba ni Kai Kotoba (売り言葉に買い言葉 - Tit for Tat)

May 14, 2019 22:42
Uri Kotoba ni Kai Kotoba

Have you ever exchanged harsh words with someone?

Such an act is called 'uri kotoba ni kai kotoba' (売り言葉に買い言葉) in Japanese.

Since 'uri' (売り) means "selling," 'kotoba' (言葉) means "word," and 'kai' (買い) means "buying," the literal meaning of this phrase is "selling words and buying words."

In Japanese, to pick a quarrel/fight is expressed 'kenka wo uru' (喧嘩を売る - literally means "to sell a quarrel/fight"), and to take up the quarrel/fight is expressed as 'kenka wo kau' (喧嘩を買う - literally means "to buy a quarrel/fight").

That is to say, 'uri kotoba' (売り言葉) means "words that cause a fight," and 'kai kotoba' (買い言葉) means "words that take up a fight."

This phrase can be translated as "tit for tat" in English.
売り言葉に買い言葉

誰かに喧嘩腰な言葉をかけられ、相応の乱暴な言葉を返したことはありますか?

そのようなことを、日本語で「売り言葉に買い言葉」と言います。

「売り」は "selling"、「言葉」は "word"、「買い」は "buying" を意味するので、「売り言葉に買い言葉」の文字どおりの意味は "selling words and buying words" となります。

日本語では、わざと喧嘩を仕掛けることを「喧嘩を売る」、売られた喧嘩に応じることを「喧嘩を買う」と表現します。

すなわち、「売り言葉」は「喧嘩を仕掛けるような言葉」、「買い言葉」は「売り言葉に喧嘩腰で応じる言葉」というわけです。

英語では "tit for tat" のように表現されます。
No. 1 Oceansea's correction
Toru
Thank you for the correction! :)

Kichin-to (きちんと - Neatly)

May 13, 2019 23:35
Kichin-to

Japanese parents may say 'kichin-to shinasai' (きちんとしなさい) when scolding their children.

'Kichin-to' (きちんと) is an adverb that means "neatly" or "orderly," and 'sinasai' (しなさい) is an imperative form of 'suru' (する - "do").

There are several theories about the etymology of 'kichin' (きちん) -- one theory says that it comes from 'kichōmen' (几帳面- "well-organized"), and another theory says that it comes from a Chinese term.

[Example] 'Kichin-to fuku wo tatamu' (きちんと服を畳む - "I neatly fold my clothes.")
きちんと

だらしない子どもに対して、親は「きちんとしなさい」と言って叱ることがあります。

「きちんと」は「整っているさま」や「正確なさま」を意味する副詞で、「しなさい」は "do" を意味する「する」の命令形です。

「きちん」の語源については諸説あり、ある説では、"well-organized" を意味する「几帳面(な)」から来ていると説明し、またある説では中国語から来ていると説明しています。

【例文】きちんと服を畳む。
No. 1 Pajh's correction
An informative and well written post, I enjoyed reading it very much!
Thank you!
Toru
Thank you for reading my post!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Ateji (当て字 - Phonetic Equivalent) Part 2

May 12, 2019 22:11
Ateji Part 2

Yesterday, I introduced two meanings of 'ateji' (当て字).

I would like to show you examples of them.

[Ateji based only on the readings of kanji]
・目茶苦茶(めちゃくちゃ - "unreasonable")
(目 means "eye," 茶 means "tea," and 苦 means "bitter.")

・出鱈目(でたらめ - "incoherent")
(出 means "come out," 鱈 means "Pacific cod," and 目 means "eye.")

・仏蘭西(フランス - "France")
(仏 means "Buddha," 蘭 means "orchid," and 西 means "west.")

[Ateji based only on the meanings of kanji]
・紅葉(もみじ - "autumn color")
(紅 means "red" and 葉 means "leaf.")

・紫水晶(アメジスト - "amethyst")
(紫 means "purple" and 水晶 means "crystal.")
当て字 Part 2

昨日は「当て字」が持つ二つの意味を紹介しました。

今日は、それぞれの当て字の例を紹介します、

【漢字の意味を無視した当て字】
・めちゃくちゃ(目茶苦茶)
・でたらめ(出鱈目)
・フランス(仏蘭西)

【漢字の読みを無視した当て字】
・もみじ(紅葉)
・アメジスト(紫水晶)

Ateji (当て字 - Phonetic Equivalent) Part 1

May 11, 2019 18:13
Ateji Part 1

I used the Japanese word 'ateji' (当て字) several times in my previous posts.

When looking up it in a dictionary, it is translated as "phonetic equivalent," but I think that the nuance is a little incorrect.

Since 'ate' (当て) means "to assign" and 'ji' (字) means "character," the literal meaning of 'ateji' is "assigned characters."

In actual situations, 'ateji' has two different meanings.

One is to assign kanji characters to foreign or Japanese terms based on only the readings, ignoring the actual meaning of the kanji.

The other is to assign kanji characters based on only the meanings, ignoring the readings of the kanji.

To be continued.
当て字 Part 1

私はこれまでの投稿で、何度か「当て字」という日本語を使ってきました。

「当て字」で辞書を引くと "phonetic equivalent" が出てきますが、少しニュアンスが違うような気がします。

「当て」は "to assign"、「字」は "character" を意味するので、「当て字」の文字どおりの意味は "assigned characters" となります。

実際には、「当て字」は大きく二つの意味を持ちます。

一つは、漢字の本来の意味を無視し、読み方のみを考慮して外来語や和語に漢字を当てることです。

もう一つは、漢字の読み方を無視し、意味のみを考慮して外来語や和語に漢字を当てることです。

続く
No. 1 Oceansea's correction
Your writing is good. I'm just writing stylistic thoughts and ideas. There isn't much to correct on this post.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and comments! (^^)

Shufu and Shufu (主婦と主夫 - Homemaker)

May 10, 2019 16:12
Shufu and Shufu

A married woman who manages her family's home and caring for her children is called 'shufu' (主婦 - "housewife") in Japanese.

Since 'shu' (主) means "principal" and 'fu' (婦) means "lady," the literal meaning of 'shufu' (主婦) is "principal lady."

On the other hand, these days men who manage his family's home are increasing, so another term 'shufu' (主夫 - "househusband") has come to be used.

Since 'fu' (夫) means "husband," the literal meaning of 'shufu' (主夫) is "principal husband."

Note that both 主婦 and 主夫 have the same pronunciation.
主婦と主夫

家事や育児を担当する既婚女性のことを、日本語で「主婦」と言います。

「主」は "principal"、「婦」は "lady" を意味するので、「主婦」の文字どおりの意味は "principal lady" となります。

一方、近年では男性が家事や育児を担当することも増えていることから、「主夫」という言葉も使われるようになっています。

「夫」は "husband" を意味するので、「主夫」の文字どおりの意味は "principal husband" となります。

「主婦」も 「主夫」も全く同じ発音で紛らわしいので、注意して下さい。

英語ではどちらも意味する "" という中性的な言葉があるようです。
No. 1 alexandra's correction
Toru
Thank you for correcting my post! :)

Gomakasu (ごまかす - Covering up) Part 2

May 9, 2019 20:16
Gomakasu Part 2

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'gomakasu' (ごまかす), which means to cover up something or tell a lie, and showed you one of two major theories about its etymology.

Another theory says that it comes from 'gomagyō' (護摩行), which is a training of 'Shingon-shū' (真言宗 - "Shingon Buddhism").

'Goma' (護摩) is a kind of rituals that burns offerings or wood, and 'gyō' (行) means "training."

After doing 'gomagyō', ashes remain.

It is said that some people sold these ashes (or just other ashes) as ashes of 'gomagyō' performed by Kōbō-Daishi (弘法大師) who founded 'Shingon-shū'.

Because of this, such an act of deceiving someone came to be called 'gomakasu', by adding the prefix 'kasu' (かす).
ごまかす Part 2

昨日は "cover up something/tell a lie" を意味する「ごまかす」という言葉と、語源に関する二つの説の内一つを紹介しました。

もう一つの説は、真言宗の修行「護摩行」から来ているというものです。

「護摩」は供物や護摩木を燃やす儀式で、「行」は修行を意味します。

護摩行の後には、灰が残ります。

この灰(もしくはただの灰)を、真言宗の開祖である弘法大師が護摩行を行った際の灰だと偽り売る詐欺があったそうです。

そこから、そのような人を欺く行為を「護摩」に接尾文字「かす」をつけて「ごまかす」とい言うようになったというわけです。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Gomakasu (ごまかす - Covering up) Part 1

May 8, 2019 21:05
Gomakasu Part 1

I am not good at doing 'gomakasu' (ごまかす).

'Gomakasu' means to cover up something, change the subject, or tell a lie, in order to gloss over things.

There are two major theories about its etymology.

One is that it comes from a Japanese sesame confection called 'goma dōran' (胡麻胴乱).

This snack was made by mixing flour and sesame seeds then baking them, and the inside was hollow.

Because of this, superficial things came to be called 'gomakashi' (胡麻菓子 - literally means "sesame confection"), and the verb 'gomakasu' was born.

To be continued.
ごまかす Part 1

私は失敗を「ごまかす」のが苦手です。

「ごまかす」は、その場をとりつくろうために、話を逸らしたりでまかせを言うことを意味する動詞です。

この言葉の語源には、大きく二つの説があります。

一つは、「胡麻胴乱」という胡麻の菓子から来ているというものです。

胡麻胴乱は小麦粉に胡麻を混ぜて焼き膨らませたお菓子で、中が空洞になっています。

このことから、中身がなくて見掛け倒しのものを「胡麻菓子」と呼ぶようになり、「ごまかす」が生まれたというわけです。

続く
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
Toru
Thank you for reading my post! :)
sjstrauss
Of course! :)

Tehepero (てへぺろ)

May 7, 2019 19:33
Tehepero

Have you ever tried to hide your embarrassment when you made a mistake?

In such a case, you might be able to use the slang term 'tehepero' (てへぺろ).

It is said that this term was made by a Japanese voice actor, Yōko Hikasa, and now it is widely used mainly among young people.

'Tehe' (てへ) represents bashfulness while laughing, and 'pero' (ぺろ) represents an action of sticking out one's tongue.

That is to say, 'tehepero' means to stick out your tongue while laughing and getting shy, and this adorable behavior has a purpose for hiding your mistake and being forgiven.
てへぺろ

失敗をしてしまったときや恥ずかしいとき、ごまかしたいと思ったことはありますか?

そのようなときには、「てへぺろ」という俗語が使えるかもしれません。

この言葉は、声優の日笠陽子が使い始め、それが広まったとされています。

「てへ」は笑いながら恥ずかしがる動作を、「ぺろ」は舌を出す動作を表しています。

すなわち「てへぺろ」は、はにかみながら舌を出すことを意味し、そのかわいらしい動作で失敗を許してもらう意図があるというわけです。
No. 1 Yogian's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 friendfromfaraway's correction
3(・ω<) テヘペロ

Monomi Yusan (物見遊山 - Sightseeing)

May 6, 2019 13:09
Monomi Yusan

I would like to do 'monomi yusan' (物見遊山) sometimes.

Since 'mono' (物) means "thing," 'mi' (見) means "to see," 'yu' (遊) means "to play," and 'san' (山) means "mountain," the literal meaning of the combination is "to see things and to play at mountains."

'Yusan' (遊山) was originally a Buddhist term, which meant that a Zen monk who finished training moves to the next temple (mountain) while going around various places.

Later, 'yusan' came to mean to go to mountains for playing, and 'monomi yusan' came to mean to go to various places for sightseeing or playing.
物見遊山

たまには「物見遊山」したいものです。

「物」は "thing"、「見」は "to see"、「遊」は "to play"、「山」は "mountain" を意味するので、「物見遊山」の文字どおりの意味は "to see things and to play at mountains" となります。

「遊山」はもともと仏教用語で、修業を終えた僧が各地を巡りながら次の寺(山)に移動することを意味していました。

これが野山に遊びに行くという意味になり「物見遊山」は「気晴らしにいろいろなところに遊びに行くこと」を意味するようになったというわけです。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)

Ten Straight Days off

May 5, 2019 15:56
Ten Straight Days off

Japan has consecutive holidays called "Golden Week," and its period is ten days in 2019.

The details are shown as follows:

April 27 (Sat) ... Saturday
April 28 (Sun) ... Sunday
April 29 (Mon) ... Shōwa Day
April 30 (Tue) ... National Holiday
May 1 (Wed) ... Enthronement of the Crown Prince
May 2 (Thu) ... National Holiday
May 3 (Fri) ... Constitution Day
May 4 (Sat) ... Greenery Day
May 5 (Sun) ... Children's Day
May 6 (Mon) ... Substitute Holiday

Since the Crown Prince was enthroned on May 1, this day became a national holiday only in 2019.

In addition, a weekday between national holidays also becomes a national holiday according to Japanese law, so both April 30 and May 2 became holidays.

Furthermore, when a national holiday coincides with Sunday, next Monday becomes a substitute holiday, so May 6 became a holiday.

Due to the overlapping of several factors, it has become such a long holiday.
10連休

日本にはゴールデンウィークと呼ばれる連休があり、2019年は10連休となりました。

その内訳は下記のとおりです。

4月27日(土)・・・休日
4月28日(日)・・・休日
4月29日(月)・・・昭和の日
4月30日(火)・・・国民の休日
5月1日(水)・・・皇太子殿下即位・改元
5月2日(木)・・・国民の休日
5月3日(金)・・・憲法記念日
5月4日(土)・・・みどりの日
5月5日(日)・・・こどもの日
5月6日(月)・・・振替休日

5月1日に皇太子殿下が即位されたため、2019年に限りこの日が祝日となりました。

そして日本では祝日に挟まれた平日は「国民の休日」となるため、4月30日と5月2日が休みとなります。

さらに、祝日と日曜日などが重なった場合は、休日が減らないよう次の平日を「振替休日」とする制度があるため、5月6日も休みとなります。

幾つかの要素が重なり合って、このような長い連休になったというわけです。
No. 1 brickonator ブリコネーター's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
> "Became" is not wrong here, but could be a bit vague.
May 1st except 2019 is not a national holiday, so the former correction seems to be appropriate. :)
No. 2 ピポ's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Teiban (定番 - Regular)

May 4, 2019 22:14
Teiban

In my post yesterday, I used the Japanese term 'teiban' (定番).

'Teiban' means something standard, regular, or perennial.

This term is short for 'teiban shōhu' (定番商品), and it was originally used in the garment industry.

Since 'tei' (定) means "fixed," 'ban' (番) means "number," and 'shōhin' (商品) means "goods," the literal meaning of the combination is "fixed number goods."

In the garment or its related industry, goods are managed by assigning numbers.

That is to say, 'teiban shōhin' means "goods that can be expected to have stable sales regardless of the trend," and later, 'teiban' came to be used in various situations.
定番

昨日の投稿の中で、私は「定番」という言葉を使用しました。

「定番」とは、お決まりのものや、代表的なものを表す言葉です。

この言葉はもともと服飾業界で使われた用語で、「定番商品」を省略したものです。

「定」は ”fixed”、「番」は ”number”、「商品」は ”goods” を意味するので、「定番商品」の文字どおりの意味は ”fixed number goods” となります。

服飾業界などでは商品に番号をつけて管理します。

この商品番号が定まっていることから、「定番商品」は「流行に左右されず安定した売上が期待できる商品」という意味で使われるようになり、現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。

Omegane ni Kanau (御眼鏡に適う - Giving Favor with Someone)

May 3, 2019 21:23
Omegane ni Kanau

Several days ago, I introduced Japanese terms, 'megane' (眼鏡 - "glasses"), 'mushimegane' (虫眼鏡 - "magnifying glass"), and 'iromegane' (色眼鏡 - "colored glasses").

There is a famous idiom that uses 'megane' -- it is 'omegane ni kanau' (御眼鏡に適う).

'O' (御) is a polite prefix, 'megane' (眼鏡) means "glasses," and 'kanau' (適う) means "to suit," so the literal meaning of 'omegane ni kanau' is "to suit one's glasses."

Here, glasses imply that someone's ability to assess things.

In other words, 'omegane ni kanau' means to gain favor with someone.
御眼鏡に適う

数日前に、「眼鏡」「虫眼鏡」「色眼鏡」という日本語を紹介しました。

「眼鏡」を使った慣用句としては、「御眼鏡に適う」があります。

「御」は丁寧の接頭辞、「眼鏡」は "glasses"、「適う」は "to suit" を意味するので、「御眼鏡に適う」の文字どおりの意味は "to suit one's glasses" となります。

ここで「眼鏡」は、「物を見きわめること」やその能力を意味します。

すなわち「御眼鏡に適う」は、誰かに気に入られたり、実力を認められたりすることを表します。

Family Trip 2019

May 2, 2019 21:56
Family Trip 2019

We are now in 'Enakyō' (恵那峡 - "Ena Gorge") on a family trip.

First, we went to an amusement park named Enakyō Wonderland, then rode some attractions, had a barbecue and observed sheep shearing.

In addition, we enjoyed exploring the wonderful natural environment -- there was a beautiful river surrounded by mountains.

After that, we went to a hotel, went in a hot spring, had dinner, and played table tennis.

Playing table tennis while wearing yukata (Japanese summer kimono) at a hot spring inn is very common in Japan.

We will enjoy the nature of Enakyō further by riding a cruiser.
家族旅行2019

私は今、家族旅行で恵那峡に来ています。

まずは恵那峡ワンダーランドという遊園地に行き、アトラクションに乗ったりバーベキューをしたり、羊の毛刈りを見学したりしました。

また、自然に囲まれた環境を散策して楽しみました。

その後はホテルに行き、温泉に入り、夕食を食べ、卓球などをしました。

日本の温泉旅館で浴衣を着て卓球をするのは定番です。

明日は遊覧船に乗り、恵那峡の自然を満喫する予定です。
No. 1 vikas's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

First Day of Reiwa

May 1, 2019 12:39
First Day of Reiwa

Today is the first day of 'Reiwa' (令和).

As I wrote in my post yesterday, Japan has its own way of counting years, and it was 'Heisei' (平成) until yesterday.

'Heisei' ended in 31 years, and it has been 'Reiwa gan-nen' (令和元年) from today.

The first year of the new era is called 'gan-nen' (元年), which is the term combining 'gen' (元 - "original") and 'nen' (年 - "year").

After the first year, it is simply called a combination of numbers and 'nen', such as 'Reiwa 2 nen' (令和2年) and 'Reiwa 3 nen' (令和3年).
令和最初の日

今日は令和最初の日です。

昨日の記事で書いたとおり、日本には独自の紀年法である元号があり、昨日までは平成でした。

平成は31年で終わり、今日から令和元年です。

元号が変わって最初の一年は、"original" を意味する「元」と "year" を意味する「年」を組み合わせて「元年」と呼ばれます。

2年目以降は「令和2年」「令和3年」のように、単に数字と「年」を組み合わせて呼ばれます。
No. 1 Gc1998's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Last Day of Heisei

Apr 30, 2019 22:34
Last Day of Heisei

Today is the last day of 'Heisei' (平成).

Do you know about the Japanese 'gengo' (元号)?

'Gengo' is a kind of ways of counting years (regnal era name) that is used in eastern Asia, and in modern Japan, it changes in association with the enthronement of the new Emperor.

It is 'Heisei' (平成) now, but it will become 'Reiwa' (令和) from tomorrow (after about one hour).

Incidentally, the period of 'Heisei' is about 30 years, and it was 'Shōwa' (昭和) before 'heisei'.

Sadly, people who were born in 'Shōwa' are sometimes treated as old men/women.
平成最後の日

今日は平成最後の日です。

日本の元号のことをご存知でしょうか。

元号はアジア東部における紀年法の一種で、近代の日本では天皇の即位に伴って元号も変わります。

今は「平成」ですが、明日(約1時間後)からは「令和」になります。

ちなみに平成は約30年で、平成の前は「昭和」です。

悲しいことに、「昭和生まれ」は年配扱いされることもあります。
No. 1 ピポ's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Iromegane (色眼鏡 - Colored Glasses)

Apr 29, 2019 20:41
Iromegane

I introduced you to the 'megane' (眼鏡 - "glasses") two days ago, and introduced 'mushimegane' (虫眼鏡 - "magnifying glass") yesterday.

Today I would like to talk about the Japanese 'iromegane' (色眼鏡).

Since 'iro' (色) means "color" and 'megane' (眼鏡) means "glasses," the literal meaning of 'iromegane' is "colored glasses."

Of course, 'iromegane' can mean a pair of colored glasses such as sunglasses.

However, I think that it is often used to mean that someone looks on something from a biased perspective.

[Example] 'Kare wa itsumo iromegane de hito wo miru' (彼はいつも色眼鏡で人を見る - He always looks on people from a biased perspective).
色眼鏡

一昨日は "glasses" を意味する「眼鏡」、昨日は "magnifying glasses" を意味する「虫眼鏡」を紹介しました。

今日は、「色眼鏡」という日本語を紹介します。

「色」は "color" を意味するので、「色眼鏡」の文字どおりの意味は "colored glasses" となります。

この言葉は、サングラスのような色のついた眼鏡を指すこともあります。

しかし、偏見や先入観をもった物の見方を表す際に使われることが多いです。

【例文】彼はいつも色眼鏡で人を見る。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
sjstrauss
You're welcome ^^

Mushimegane (虫眼鏡 - Magnifying Glass/Loupe)

Apr 28, 2019 23:03
Mushimegane

Yesterday, I introduced you to the Japanese term 'megane' (眼鏡), which means "glasses."

By adding 'mushi' (虫 - "insect") to 'megane', it becomes 'mushimegane' (虫眼鏡), which means "magnifying glass."

It is considered that because 'mushimegane' is a tool for looking at small things such as insects, this name was given.

Incidentally, if you want to say it more formally, you can use another term 'kakudaikyou' (拡大鏡) instead of 'mushimegane'.

'Kakudai' (拡大) means "magnification," and 'kyou' (鏡) usually means "mirror," but here it means "lens."
虫眼鏡

昨日は "glasses" を意味する「眼鏡」という日本語を紹介しました。

この「眼鏡」に "insect" を意味する「虫」をつけて「虫眼鏡」にすると、"magnifying glass" という意味になります。

虫など小さいものを見るための道具であるから、このような名前がつけられたものと考えられます。

ちなみに、よりフォーマルな言い方は「拡大鏡」です。

「拡大」は "magnification" を、「鏡」は通常 "mirror" を意味しますが、ここでは "lens" を意味します。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
'Mushimegane' seems cuter somehow, though ^^
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post!
Yes, this term is a little childish. :)

Megane (眼鏡 - Glasses)

Apr 27, 2019 23:44
Megane

Today I bought a 'megane' (眼鏡).

'Megane' is a Japanese word that means "glasses."

'Me' (眼) means "eye," but the exact etymology of 'gane' (鏡) has not been clarified yet.

One web page explains that it comes from 'sashigane' (さしがね), which means "ruler," and another page explains that it comes from 'kagami' (鏡), which has the same kanji for 'gane' and means "mirror."

Incidentally, it is said that glasses were invented in Italy in 1284, and it was imported to Japan by Francisco de Xavier in 1551.
眼鏡

私は今日「眼鏡」を買いました。

「眼鏡」は "glasses" を意味する日本語であす。

「眼」は "eye" を意味する言葉ですが、「鏡」について正確な語源はわかっていません。

あるサイトでは、「さしがね(物差し)」から来ていると説明し、またあるサイトでは「鏡(かがみ)」から来ていると説明しています。

ちなみに、眼鏡はイタリアで1284年に発明され、1551年にフランシスコ・ザビエルが日本に伝えたとされています。
No. 1 Martin's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
No. 2 Kenny's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 3 friendfromfaraway's correction
眼鏡は眼の鏡(かがみ)でしょう?もともとglassesはeyeglasses, つまり eye (め)と (looking)-glass つまり、mirrorってことです。面白いですね?
Toru
Thank you for the correction!
面白いですね :)
なにかをよく見ることを「鏡」と言っていたという説もあります。
No. 4 artboy598's correction

Yaki ga Mawaru (焼きが回る - Becoming Dull)

Apr 26, 2019 23:31
Yaki ga Mawaru

To become dull or to decline ability is expressed as 'yaki ga mawaru' (焼きが回る) in Japanese.

'Yaki' (焼き) means "burnt" and 'mawaru' (回る) means "to go around" or "to spread," so the literal meaning of 'yaki ga mawaru' is "the burnt area spreads."

When making a blade or edged tool, it is burned then cooled to improve the edge.

However, if you overheat it, the blade will be fragile, and the edge will become dull.

That is to say, the expression 'yaki ga mawaru' compares the sharpness of a blade with human ability.
焼きが回る

年をとるなどして思考力や能力が鈍くなることを、「焼きが回る」と言います。

「焼き」は ""、「回る」は "" を意味するので、「焼きが回る」の文字どおりの意味は "" です。

刃物を作る際、切れ味を良くするために高温に熱してから冷やす工程があります。

ここで、熱を加えすぎてしまうと、かえって刃がもろく切れ味が悪くなってしまいます。

すなわち「焼きが回る」という表現は、刃物の切れ味を人間の能力に例えているというわけです。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good!
Keep sharpening those English skills! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction and comment! :)
jeemeegee
You're welcome! :)

Gotaku wo Naraberu (御託を並べる - Harping on the Same String)

Apr 25, 2019 11:16
Gotaku wo Naraberu

To say something selfish continuously or to harp on the same string is described as 'gotaku wo naraberu' (御託を並べる) in Japanese.

'Gotaku' (御託) is short for 'gotakusen' (御託宣) -- 'go' (御) is a polite prefix and 'takusen' (託宣) means "divine revelation."

In addition, 'naraberu' (並べる) usually means "to arrange something," but here it implies that "to say something continuously."

Therefore, the literal meaning of 'gotaku wo naraberu' is "to say divine revelations continuously."

Originally, 'gotaku/gotakusen' didn't have a bad meaning, but 'gotaku wo naraberu' came to have its current meaning because of people who said something selfish/tedious as divine revelations.
御託を並べる

自分勝手なことをくどくど言うことを、日本語で「御託を並べる」と言います。

「御託」は「御託宣」を省略した語であり、「御」は丁寧の接頭辞、「託宣」は神のお告げを意味します。

また、「並べる」は "to arrange something" を意味しますが、ここでは "to say something continuously" (何かを言い続けること)を表しています。

したがって、「御託を並べる」の文字どおりの意味は "to say divine revelations continuously" となります。

もともと「御託」は悪い意味ではなかったようですが、神のお告げとして自分勝手なことを偉そうに話すものもいたためか、「御託を並べる」は現在の意味を持つようになりました。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Toru
Thank you very much for the correction! (^^)
No. 2 bazz's correction
良く出来ました。ぐうぜんと勉強になりましたよ。
Good job!
bazz
The Lang-8 system made my last edit hard to read. Here is what it says:

Originally, 'gotaku/gotakusen' didn't have a negative connotation, but that changed due to people who spoke selfish/tedious words as divine revelations.

In my effort to make it natural, I changed a bit much on you, but I hope it helps.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I understand well. :)

Chidoriashi (千鳥足 - Walking Zigzag)

Apr 24, 2019 22:53
Chidoriashi

To walk with a stagger (especially in a drunk state) is called 'chidoriashi' (千鳥足) in Japanese.

Since 'chidori' (千鳥) means "plover" and 'ashi' (足) means "foot," the literal meaning of 'chidoriashi' is "plover feet."

Have you ever seen plover's feet or its way of walking?

Many birds have a supportive finger on the back side of their feet, but plovers have only three fingers in front of their feet, so they walk in zigzags.

Because of this, 'chidoriashi' came to mean to walk zigzag or with a stagger, especially while drunk.
千鳥足

酒によってふらふらと歩くことを、日本語で「千鳥足」と言います。

「千鳥」は "plover"、「足」は "foot" を意味するので、「千鳥足」の文字どおりの意味は "plover feet" となります。

千鳥の足の指や歩き方を見たことはありますか?

多くの鳥の足には後ろ側に支える指がありますが、千鳥の足は前に3本の指があるのみで、左右ジグザクに進みます。

このことから、「千鳥足」は左右によろめいて歩くこと、特に酒によった人の歩き方を意味するようになったとうわけです。
No. 1 rebarnes22's correction
Very interesting and well-written!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Let me ask you a question. "Feet" is plural, but is "a plover's feet" grammatically correct?
rebarnes22
Yes. since a plover has 2 feet, if you are referring to both of them, you should use the plural..

Nehori Hahori (根掘り葉掘り - Thoroughly)

Apr 23, 2019 14:57
Nehori Hahori

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'ne mo ha mo nai' (根も葉もない), which means that a theory/talk has no foundation.

As another idiom that uses both 'ne' (根) and 'ha' (葉), there is 'nehori hahori' (根掘り葉掘り).

'Ne' (根) means "root," 'ha' (葉) means "leaf," and 'hori' (掘り) means "to dig," so the literal meaning of 'nehori hahori' is "to dig roots and leaves."

Since "root" implies an essence of things, this idiom has the meaning of "thoroughly."

'Hahori' (葉掘り - "to dig leaves") is a little semantically strange -- this was just added to emphasize the meaning of 'nehori' (根掘り - "to dig roots") and adjust the rhythm of this idiom.

[Example] 'Kare wa kanojo no koto wo nehori hahori kiite kita' (彼は彼女のことを根掘り葉掘り聞いてきた - "He asked me about every detail of her").
根掘り葉掘り

昨日は、何も根拠をないことを表す言葉「根も葉もない」を紹介しました。

「根」と「葉」を使う表現としては、他に「根掘り葉掘り」があります。

「根」は "root"、「葉」は "leaf"、「掘り」は "to " を意味するので、「根掘り葉掘り」の文字どおりの意味は "to dig roots and leaves" となります。

「根を掘り起こす」ことから、この言葉は「徹底的に」や「しつこく」といった意味を持ちます。

「葉を掘る」はおかしな表現ですが、これは「根堀り」の意味を強めるため、また語調を合わせるためにつけられたものです。

【例文】彼は彼女のことを根掘り葉掘り聞いてきた。
No. 1 Niko-Neko's correction
Wow, you are a wonderful writer! I was being a little picky with your entry because it was so well written. I made my corrections based on what I felt would be the most natural.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Ne mo Ha mo nai (根も葉もない - Groundless)

Apr 22, 2019 11:40
Ne mo Ha mo nai

To describe that a theory or talk has no foundation, you can use the Japanese term 'ne mo ha mo nai' (根も葉もない).

Since 'ne' (根) means "root," 'ha' (葉) means "leaf," and 'nai' (ない) means "nothing," so the literal meaning of 'ne mo ha mo nai' is "there is neither roots nor leaves."

Roots and leaves are very important parts for plants.

If you compare "theory" or "talk" to "plant," "root" and "leaf" will be "foundation" and "result/conclusion," respectively.

That is to say, 'ne mo ha mo nai' means that a theory/talk is unfounded/groundless.
根も葉もない

何の根拠もないことを形容する言葉として、「根も葉もない」があります。

「根」は "root"、「葉」は "leaf"、「ない」は "nothing" を意味するので、「根も葉もない」の文字どおりの意味は "there is neither root nor leaf" となります。

植物にとって、「根」と「葉」はとても重要な部分です。

「理論」を「植物」に例えると、「根」は「根拠」、「葉」は「結論」に相当します。

すなわち「根も葉もない」とは、理論・話がでたらめであるというわけです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
なるほど!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Betsubara (別腹 - Dessert Stomach)

Apr 21, 2019 22:40
Betsubara

Today, I used the Japanese term 'betsubara' (別腹) when eating dinner with my friend.

'Betsubara' means that you can eat (have room for) your favorite food even if you are full -- it is often used especially for sweets or dessert.

'Betsu' (別) means "another" and 'bara/hara' (腹) means "stomach."

That is to say, 'betsubara' implies that there is another stomach apart from your usual stomach, and your favorite food goes into there.

[Example] 'Dezāto wa betsubara desu' (デザートは別腹です - "There is room for dessert").
別腹

私は今日、「別腹」という言葉を使いました。

「別腹」は、満腹な状態であっても好物であれば食べることができることを意味する言葉であり、特に甘い菓子などに対して使われることが多いです。

「別」は "another"、「腹」は "stomach" を意味します。

すなわち「別腹」とは、いつも使っている腹とは別のところに腹があり、好物はそこに入っていくことを暗に意味しているわけです。

【例文】デザートは別腹です。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
I shouldn't be surprised, but I had no idea there was a Japanese term for this too! I said this a lot at dessert time when I was a child... haha :)
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post!
Haha, interestingly, in the US it seems to be often used by children, whereas in Japan, it is often used by adults.

Amet o Muchi (飴と鞭 - Carrot and Stick)

Apr 20, 2019 22:03
Ame to Muchi

To control someone by giving reward and punishment alternately is called 'ame to muchi' (飴と鞭 or アメとムチ) in Japanese.

Since 'ame' (飴/アメ) means "candy" and 'muchi' (鞭/ムチ) means "stick/whip," so the literal meaning of 'ame to muchi' is "candy and stick."

The origin of this phrase is the policies of suppression and concession, conducted by Otto von Bismarck, Chancellor of the German Empire.

It is "zuckerbrot und peitsche" in German, and "carrot and stick" in English -- the Japanese version use "candy" instead of "carrot."
飴と鞭

時には厳しく叱り、時には甘やかすことで、人を思い通りに動かすことを「飴と鞭」と言います。

「飴」は "candy"、「鞭」は "stick/whip" を意味するので、「飴と鞭」の文字どおりの意味は "candy and stick" となります。

この言葉は、ドイツの宰相ビスマルクが行った弾圧と譲歩の政策に由来します。

ドイツ語では "zuckerbrot und peitsche," 英語では "carrot and stick" と言い、「飴」ではなく「ニンジン」が使われています。
No. 1 sjstrauss's correction
It's interesting how phrases have minor changes like that in different languages.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, it is interesting that phrases change (are born) depending on the characteristics of the country. :)

Shirami Tsubushi (虱潰し - One by One)

Apr 19, 2019 21:11
Shirami Tsubushi

Today, I eliminated bugs in my source codes right and left, and step by step.

To process something one by one to avoid missing a thing like this is called 'shirami tsubushi' (虱潰し) in Japanese.

'Shirami' (虱) means "louse (lice)," and 'tsubushi' (潰し) means "to crush" or "to kill," so the literal meaning of 'shirami tsubushi' is "to kill/crush lice."

Since lice are very small, if you want to remove (kill) them from someone's head, you have to check the hairs one by one.

Because of this, 'shirami tsubushi' came to have its current meaning.
虱潰し

私は今日、ソースコードのバグを片端から一つ一つ取り除きました。

このように、わずかな見逃しもないように一つ一つ処理をすることを、「虱潰し」と言います。

「虱」は "louse (lice)"、「潰し」は "to crush/kill" を意味するので、「虱潰し」の文字どおりの意味は "to kill/crush lice" です。

「虱」はとても小さく、他人の髪の毛についた虱を取り除くには、一本一本調べて潰していく必要があります。

このことから、「虱潰し」は現在の意味を持つようになったというわけです。
No. 1 Kiwi's correction
I love how these nostalgic Japanese phrases hearken to a bygone era. These days, getting rid of lice is as easy as 1: shaving off hair or 2: covering your head with peanut butter
Toru
Thank you for the comment! Shaving off hair was often done as a method against lice also in Japan, but I didn't know the latter way. :)
No. 2 sjstrauss's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for checking my post! :)
sjstrauss
Of course! :)

Hachiku no Ikioi (破竹の勢い - Tremendous Momentum)

Apr 18, 2019 10:54
Hachiku no Ikioi

When something has an intense momentum and it can't be stopped, you can describe that using the Japanese idiom 'hachiku no ikioi' (破竹の勢い).

'Ha' (破) means "to break," 'chiku' (竹) means "bamboo," and 'ikioi' (勢い) means "momentum," so the literal meaning of 'hachiku no ikioi' is "a momentum of breaking a bamboo."

If you try to divide a bamboo into two with a knife, it will break swiftly from the top to the bottom.

Because of this, 'hachiku' (破竹 - "breaking a bamboo") came to mean "an intense momentum that can't be stopped."
破竹の勢い

とどめることができないほど勢いが激しいことを、日本語で「破竹の勢い」と言います。

「破」は "to break"、「竹」は "bamboo"、「勢い」は "momentum" を意味するので、「破竹の勢い」の文字どおりの意味は "a momentum of breaking a bamboo" となります。

竹は刃物で最初の一節を割ると、あとは一気に最後まで勢いよく割れてしまいます。

このことから、「破竹」は「勢いがとどめがたいこと」を表すようになったというわけです。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Oha-konban-chiwa (おはこんばんちは - Good Morning/Afternoon/Evening)

Apr 17, 2019 10:50
Oha-konban-chiwa

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'shigo' (死語), which means "dead language" or "dead word."

When I looked up this term on the Internet, I found the phrase 'oha-konban-chiwa' (おはこんばんちは).

This phrase is the combination of 'ohayō' (おはよう - "good morning"), 'kon-nichiwa' (こんにちは - "good afternoon"), and 'konbanwa' (こんばんは - "good evening") -- this came from the song of the anime, "Dr. Slump (Arale-chan)."

Definitely, people no longer use this phrase as a greeting.

However, since it can be used regardless of time, some Japanese YouTubers use it at the beginning of their videos.
おはこんばんちは

昨日は "dead language" や "dead word" を意味する「死語」という言葉を紹介しました。

「死語」でインターネットを検索していると、「おはこんばんちは」という言葉を見つけました。

「おはこんばんちは」は、「おはよう」「こんにちは」「こんばんは」を組み合わせた造語で、アニメ「Dr.スランプ アラレちゃん」の曲が元ネタとなっています。

確かに、日常的にこの挨拶を使う人は今では見かけません。

しかし、どの時間帯でも使える便利な挨拶だからか、日本の YouTuber が冒頭で使うのをたまに見かけます
No. 1 Tom's correction
Very well written with very beautiful language.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I'm glad to hear you say that. :)

Shigo (死語 - Dead Language/Word)

Apr 16, 2019 06:23
Shigo

In my post yesterday, I used the Japanese word 'shigo' (死語).

Since 'shi' (死) means "death/dead" and 'go' (語) means "word/language," the literal meaning of 'shigo' is "dead word" or "dead language."

In linguistics, 'shigo' means a dead language that no one uses, but it is also used to mean a dead word that people rarely use or an antiquated word.

If you want to mean the latter two, you can use 'haigo' (廃語 - literally means "obsolete word"), but I think that 'shigo' is more used than 'haigo' on a daily basis.
死語

昨日の投稿の中で、「死語」という言葉を使いました。

「死」は "death/dead"、「語」は "word/language" を意味するので、「死語」の文字どおりの意味は "dead word/dead language" となります。

言語学において、「死語」は「日常話者がいなくなった自然言語」を意味しますが、「昔はよく使われたが今はあまり使われなくなった語彙」や「古臭く感じる語彙」のような意味で使われることも多いです。

後者2つの意味を表す語としては「廃語」がありますが、「死語」のほうが日常的に使われると思います。
No. 1 artboy598's correction
Long time no see!
Toru
Thank you for reading my post!
It's been a while! :)

Shame (写メ - Photo) Part 2

Apr 15, 2019 11:55
Shame (写メ) Part 2

Yesterday, I introduced the slang term 'shame' (写メ), which means to take photos with (or photos taken by) a mobile phone or smartphone.

If you want to use 'shame' as a verb, you can say 'shame-ru' (写メる) by adding the suffix 'ru' (る).

For example, 'shame-rou' (写メろう) means "let's take photos (with our smartphones)."

I often use and hear these terms, 'shame' and 'shame-ru'.

However, among the current young people, it seems that these slang terms are becoming dead words because they do not use e-mails very much.
写メ Part 2

昨日は「写メ」という俗語を紹介しました。

「写メ」を動詞として使う場合は、接頭辞「る」をつけて「写メる」のように言います。

例えば、「写メろう」のように言うことができます。

「写メ」も「写メる」も私はよく使ってきましたし、周りで使っている人も多くいます。

しかし現在の若者の間では、写真をメールに添付することや、メールをすること自体も減ってきていることから、「写メ」という言葉が死語になりつつあるようです。
No. 1 Timmy's correction
To be honest, for me, email as a tool of communication have always had an image of something you only use at work. Back in the day when I was younger we used ICQ, AIM (AOL Instant Messenger) etc. and their mobile counterparts, email was used only for formal matters.
Toru
It's been a while! :)
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the interesting information!
Actually, I didn't know these messenger services. When I was young, we used just e-mail for both formal and casual matters.
Timmy
>It's been a while! :)
>Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the interesting information!

Ha! It's been a while indeed)
You're welcome!

>Actually, I didn't know these messenger services. When I was young, we used just e-mail for >both formal and casual matters.

Oh, really. On the other hand I think that it's convenient when you have one communication tool that you can use both for work and leisure.

Shame (写メ - Photo) Part 1

Apr 14, 2019 20:07
Shame Part 1

Have you ever heard of the Japanese slang term 'shame' (写メ)?

'Shame' is short for 'sha mēru' (写メール), which is a combination of 'sha/shashin' (写/写真 - means "photo") and 'mēru' (メール - means "e-mail").

Originally, this term meant to attach a photo taken with a camera-equipped mobile phone to an e-mail.

Later, taking photos with (and photos taken by) a mobile phone or smartphone came to be called 'shame'.

[Example] 'Shame torou' (写メ撮ろう - "Let's take photos (using our smartphones).")
写メ Part 1

「写メ」という俗語を耳にしたことはありますか?

「写メ」は "photo" を意味する「写(真)」と "mail" を意味する「メール」を組み合わせた用語「写メール」を略したものです。

もともとは、カメラ付き携帯電話で撮影した写真をメールに添付することを表す言葉でした。

後に、携帯電話やスマートフォンで写真を撮影すること自体を「写メ」と呼ぶようになりました。

【例文】写メ撮ろう。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Nomikomi ga Hayai (飲み込みが早い - Learning Fast)

Apr 13, 2019 18:56
Nomikomi ga Hayai

Yesterday, I heard a compliment phrase, 'nomikomi ga hayai' (飲み込みが早い).

'Nomikomi' (飲み込み) means "to swallow something" and 'hayai' (早い) means "fast" or "quick," so the literal meaning of 'nomikomi ga hayai' is "someone swallows something quickly."

Here, 'nomikomi' implies that someone understands things or accepts a situation.

That is to say, this phrase is a compliment used for people who have can understand or learn things quickly -- they are good/quick learners.

On the other hand, people who are slow to catch on things are described as 'nomikomi ga warui' (飲み込みが悪い) by using the word 'warui' (悪い - "bad").
飲み込みが早い

私は昨日、「飲み込みが早い」という褒め言葉を耳にしました。

「飲み込み」は "to swallow something"、「早い」は "fast/quick" を意味するので、「飲み込みが早い」の文字どおりの意味は "someone swallows something quickly" となります。

ここで「飲み込み」は、物事を理解することや、納得することを表します。

すなわちこの表現は、物事の理解や習得が早い、優れた人に対して使われるというわけです。

逆に、理解や習得に時間のかかる人は、「飲み込みが悪い」と表現されます。
No. 1 Tones's correction
My Japanese partner has mentioned "nomikomi ga osoi" too - maybe more common? Anyway, great writing. Cheers
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
Yes, 'nomikomi ga osoi' (飲み込みが遅い) could be more common. :)

Kusshi (屈指 - One of the Best)

Apr 12, 2019 07:41
Kusshi

I introduced 'yubiori' (指折り), which means "to count something" or "one of the best" two days ago, and introduced 'yubiori kazoeru' (指折り数える) to mean the former ("to count something") explicitly yesterday.

If you want to mean the latter ("one of the best") explicitly, you can use the similar term 'kusshi' (屈指).

Since 'ku' (屈) means "to bend something" and 'shi' (指) means "finger," the literal meaning of 'kusshi' is "to bend your fingers."

Note that the meaning of 'kusshi' is "one of the best," and it is not used to mean "to count something."

[Example] Kare wa sekai kusshi no shisanka da (彼は世界屈指の資産家だ - "He is one of the richest people in the world.")
屈指

一昨日は「数を数える」や「特に優れている」を意味する「指折り」を、昨日は前者の「数を数える」を明示的に表す「指折り数える」という表現を紹介しました。

後者の「特に優れている」を明示的に表す類似の表現としては、「屈指」があります。

「屈」は ""、「指」は "finger" を意味するので、「屈指」の文字どおりの意味は "" となります。

「屈指」の意味は「優れている」であり、「数を数える」という意味では使われないことに注意してください。

【例文】彼は世界屈指の資産家だ。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good!! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for checking my post! :)

Yubiori Kazoeru (指折り数える - Waiting Eagerly)

Apr 11, 2019 10:50
Yubiori Kazoeru

Yesterday, I introduced the term 'yubiori' (指折り), which means "to count something" or "one of the best."

If you want to mean the former explicitly, you can say 'yubiori kazoeru' (指折り数える).

Since 'yubi' (指) means "finger," 'ori' (折り) means "to bend something," and 'kazoeru' (数える) means "to count something," the literal meaning of 'yubiori kazoeru' is "to count something by bending fingers."

In addition, this phrase can imply that you are looking forward to one day and waiting while counting the remaining days.

[Example] Kekkonshiki no hi wo yubiori kazoete matsu (結婚式の日を指折り数えて待つ - "I wait eagerly for the wedding day.")
指折り数える

昨日は「数を数える」や「特に優れている」ことを意味する「指折り」という言葉を紹介しました。

前者の意味を明示的に表したい場合は、「指折り数える」と言います。

「数える」は "to count something" を意味するので、「指折り数える」は文字どおり "to count something by bending fingers" という意味になります。

また、この表現は特に、ある日が楽しみで一日一日を数えながら待つことを意味することが多いです。

【例文】結婚式の日を指折り数えて待つ。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting me!
> You're not talking about someone else's fingers are you? ;-)
Yes, how true! :)

Yubiori (指折り - One of the Best)

Apr 10, 2019 22:42
Yubiori

Human beings sometimes bend their fingers one by one when counting something.

To count something by bending fingers is referred to as 'yubiori' (指折り) or 'yubi wo oru' (指を折る) in Japanese.

Literally, 'yubi' (指) means "finger" and 'ori/oru' (折る) means "to bend something" or "to fold something."

However, this term has another meaning -- it is "one of the best," because you can count the top five on your one hand fingers.

[Example] 'Kare wa nihon de yubiori no pianisuto da' (彼は日本で指折りのピアニストだ - "He is one of the best pianists in Japan").
指折り

人間は何かの数を数えるとき、手の指を順番に折り曲げていくことがあります。

指を折り曲げながら数えることを、日本語で「指折り」もしくは「指を折る」と言います。

文字どおり、「指」は "finger"、「折り/折る」は "to bend" を意味します。

しかし、「指折り/指を折る」にはもう一つ、「数多くある中で、特に指を折って数えられるほど優れている」という意味もあります。

【例文】彼は日本で指折りのピアニストだ。
No. 1 green's correction
>>指折りのピアニストだ
thanks Toruさん, very helpful. one of the best five in jp!
Toru
Thank you for the nice comment! (^^)
No. 2 rebarnes22's correction
Interesting entry.
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

On ni Kiseru/On wo Uru (恩に着せる/恩を売る - Making You Feel Grateful)

Apr 9, 2019 13:53
On ni Kiseru/On wo Uru

Yesterday, I introduced the phrase 'on wo ada de kaesu' (恩を仇で返す), which means to bite the hand that feeds you.

There are other idioms that use 'on' (恩 - "favor"), such as 'on ni kiseru' (恩に着せる) or 'on wo uru' (恩を売る).

Since 'kiseru' (着せる) means "to make/have someone wear something" and 'uru' (売る) means "to sell something," the literal meanings of 'on ni kiseru' and 'on wo uru' are "to make someone wear one's favors" and "to sell one's favors," respectively.

Here, 'kiseru' and 'uru' imply that you force something against someone.

That is to say, these idioms mean to act to force someone to feel one's favors.
恩に着せる/恩を売る

昨日は「恩を仇で返す」という表現を紹介しました。

「恩」を使った表現には、他に「恩に着せる」や「恩を売る」などがあります。

「恩」は "favor"、「着せる」は "to make someone wear something"、「売る」は "to sell something" を意味するので、「恩に着せる」と「恩を売る」の文字どおりの意味は、それぞれ "to make someone wear one's favors" と "to sell one's favors" になります。

ここで、「着せる」や「売る」は、「相手に何かを押し付ける」ことを表しています。

すなわちこれらの慣用句は、相手に恩を感じさせるよう行動することを意味するわけです。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
That's an interesting turn of phrase. I don't think we have a perfect English equivalent.
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post again!
> Is this right?
Yes, "make someone feel indebted to you" is what I wanted to say! :)

On wo Ada de Kaesu (恩を仇で返す - Biting the Hand that Feeds One)

Apr 8, 2019 10:40
On wo Ada de Kaesu

Have you ever done harm to someone without a feeling of gratitude, even though he/she took care of you?
(I would like you to say "No.")

Such an action is called 'on wo ada de kaesu' (恩を仇で返す) in Japanese.

'On' (恩) means "favor," 'ada' (仇) means "harm," and 'kaesu' (返す) means "to return," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "to do harm as a return of favors."

For example, you can use it to describe a scene that a child betrays his/her parents who have cherished the child.
恩を仇で返す

恩を受けたにも関わらず、感謝するどころか、害を加えるようなことをした経験はありますか?
(「ない」と言ってほしいです。)

そのような行為のことを、「恩を仇で返す」と言います。

「恩」は "favor"、「仇」は "harm"、「返す」は "to return" を意味するので、「恩を仇で返す」の文字どおりの意味は "to do harm as a return of favors" となります。

例えば、大事に育ててくれた両親を裏切る行為などを表現する際に使うことができます。
No. 1 Amop567's correction
Amop567
  • For example, you can use it to describe a scene that a child betrays their parents who have cherished them.

    I recommend using the singular "they" here. "his/her" sounds very clunky, so does repeating the word "child". If you want to use gendered language, it's better to choose one or the other.

...that a child...→...in which a child...
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and explanations! :)

Ice Cream and Shaved Ice

Apr 7, 2019 15:17
Ice Cream and Shaved Ice

Yesterday, I talked about 'kaki gōri' (かき氷), which means "shaved ice."

Which do you think is "ice cream" or "shaved ice" colder?

Ice cream is around -7 degrees Celsius, whereas shaved ice is 0 degrees Celsius.

However, I think that many people feel that shaved ice is colder than ice cream.

Since milk fat and air bubbles that are contained in ice cream do not transfer heat well, shaved ice can draw heat away from your mouth faster than ice cream.

It is getting warmer lately, so I would like to eat either one.
アイスクリームとかき氷

昨日は「かき氷」について紹介しました。

「アイスクリーム」と「かき氷」は、どちらが冷たいと思いますか?

かき氷は0℃であるのに対して、アイスクリームは-7℃程度です。

しかし実際には、かき氷のほうが冷たいと考える人も多いと思います。

アイスクリームに含まれる脂肪や空気の泡が熱を伝えにくいため、口の中の熱を奪う速度はかき氷のほうが早いというわけです。

最近暖かくなってきたので、どちらでも良いから食べたいです。
No. 1 Ashtyn's correction
Very interesting! I have never thought about that before. Are you a food scientist? Also, nice English!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
I am a scientist, but my major is engineering, haha.

Kakigōri (かき氷 - Shaved Ice)

Apr 6, 2019 13:56
Kakigōri

Have you ever eaten 'kakigōri' (かき氷)?

Kakigōri is a kind of frozen sweets made from finely shaved or crushed ice flavored with syrup, etc., and is one of the traditional Japanese features of summer.
(Of course, many other countries also have similar traditions.)

'Gōri/kōri' (氷) means "ice," but there are several theories about the etymology of 'kaki' (かき).

One theory says that it comes from the fact that we used 'kaketa kōri' (欠けた氷 - literally means "chipped ice") to make 'kakigōri'.

In English, it is often translated as "shaved ice."
かき氷

「かき氷」を食べたことはありますか?

「かき氷」とは、細かく削るか砕いた氷にシロップ等をかけた氷菓のことで、日本の夏の風物詩の一つとなっています。
(もちろん海外にも同様の食べ物があります。)

「氷」は "ice" を意味しますが、「かき」の由来には幾つかの説があります。

ある説では、「欠けた氷を使ったため」と説明しています。

英語ではよく "shaved ice" と訳されます。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
I've had shaved ice before here, but I have a feeling the ones in Japan are way better. Just a feeling.
:)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction!
there are so many kinds of shaved ice in Japan. :)

Itaku mo Kayuku mo Nai (痛くも痒くもない - Not Caring at All)

Apr 5, 2019 16:56
Itaku mo Kayuku mo Nai

When you do not feel a thing about someone's action against you, you can express it as 'itaku mo kayuku mo nai' (痛くも痒くもない).

'Itai' (痛い) means "painful," 'kayui' (痒い) means "itchy," and 'nai' (ない) is a negative term, so the literal meaning of 'itaku mo kayuku mo nai' is "it is neither painful nor itchy."

Of course, this phrase can be used for physical pain/itching, but it is often used when there is no mental influence.

[Example] Kare ni waruguchi wo iwareta ga, itaku mo kayuku mo nai (彼に悪口を言われたが、痛くも痒くもない - "He said nasty things about me, but I do not care at all").
痛くも痒くもない

相手が何かをしてきても、少しも苦痛を感じなかったり、まったく影響がないとき、「痛くも痒くもない」と言うことがあります。

「痛い」は "to pain"、「痒い」は "to itch"、「ない」は否定語であるため、「痛くも痒くもない」の文字どおりの意味は "" となります。

もちろん肉体的な「痛み」「痒み」に対しても使える表現ですが、精神的な影響がないときに使われることが多いです。

【例文】彼に悪口を言われたが、痛くも痒くもない。
No. 1 Shakearita 's correction
Everything seems correct. No errors
Toru
Thank you so much for reading my post! :)
No. 2 Amop567's correction

Kan Kinou Shougai (肝機能障害 - Hepatic Dysfunction)

Apr 4, 2019 10:15
Kan Kinou Shougai

Yesterday, I received the result of my medical checkup.

Sadly, I was diagnosed with 'kan kinou shougai' (肝機能障害).

Since 'kan' (肝) means "liver," 'kinou' (機能) means "function," and 'shougai' (障害) means "disorder" or "impairment," 'kan kinou shougai' means "liver function impairment" or "hepatic dysfunction."

I need to take an additional examination of the liver to know the details, but I could be a disease of "fatty liver" or "chronic hepatitis."

Today a welcome party will be held, but I have to refrain from drinking alcohol.
肝機能障害

昨日、健康診断の結果が届きました。

悲しいことに、「肝機能障害」と診断されてしまいました。

「肝」は "liver"、「機能」は "function"、「障害」は "disorder/impairment" を意味するので、「肝機能障害」は "liver function impairment" や "hepatic dysfunction" を意味します。

詳しくは追加の検査をしなければわかりませんが、「脂肪肝」もしくは「慢性肝炎」である可能性があります。

今日は歓迎会でしたが、私はお酒を飲むのを控えようと思います。
No. 1 Shakearita 's correction
Awe. I’m Sorry. Hopefully you will get better .
Toru
Thank you for the kind comment!
I will go to the hospital next week. :)

Tachi Ōjō (立ち往生 - Gridlock)

Apr 3, 2019 11:10
Tachi Ōjō

A traffic accident causing injury or death happened yesterday near the center of Tokyo, and many trains stopped, so many people did 'tachi ōjō' (立ち往生) at platforms.

The original meaning of 'tachi ōjō' is "to die while standing," but now it usually means a state in which someone is incapable of moving.

'Tachi' (立ち) means "to stand," and 'ōjō' (往生) is a Buddhist term that means "to die" or "to die and born in the legitimate land of Buddha."

That is to say, the literal meaning of 'tachi ōjō' is equivalent to its original meaning.
立ち往生

昨日は都心で人身事故があり、電車が止まり、多くの人が駅で「立ち往生」していました。

「立ち往生」の本来の意味は「立ったまま死ぬこと」ですが、それが転じて「身動きがとれなくなること」を表すようになりました。

「立ち」は "to stand"、「往生」は仏教用語で「死んで仏の国に生まれること」や「死ぬこと」を意味します。

すなわち「立ち往生」の本来の意味は、文字どおりの意味ということです。
No. 1 icepatton's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Ne ni Motsu (根に持つ - Holding a Grudge)

Apr 2, 2019 21:50
Ne ni Motsu

To hold a grudge for a long time is referred to as 'ne ni motsu' (根に持つ) in Japanese.

Since 'ne' (根) means "root" and 'motsu' (持つ) means "to have" or "to hold," the literal meaning of 'ne ni motsu' is "to have/hold something with a root."

Here, "root" implies a bottom of one's heart.

In addition, the object that 'motsu' points to is what you were suffered in the past.

That is to say, 'ne ni motsu' implies that you remember what you were suffered in the past with the bottom of your heart.
根に持つ

いつまでも恨みに思って忘れないことを、日本語で「根に持つ」と言います。

「根」は "root"、「持つ」は "to have" や "to hold" を意味するので、「根に持つ」の文字どおりの意味は "to have/hold something with a root" となります。

ここで「根」は「心の底」を表します。

また、「持つ」が指しているものは、過去に受けた行いなどとなります。

すなわち「根に持つ」とは、「過去に受けた行いを心の底でずっと覚えている」というようなことを表しているわけです。
No. 1 AylesC's correction
Would it be grammatically accurate to say '根に持つの人'? (A person who holds a grudge.)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post! :)
> Would it be grammatically accurate to say '根に持つの人'?
根に持つの人 is a little grammatically wrong. 根に持つ人 is fine. :)
No. 2 Kento's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

The Kanji Character with the Largest Number of Strokes

Apr 1, 2019 20:06
The Kanji Character with the Largest Number of Strokes

Today I introduced you to the kanji character which has the largest number of strokes among daily-use kanji characters.

It is 鬱 (read as 'utsu'), which needs 29 brushstrokes.

鬱 can mean that plants grow thickly or things are active, but if you use it alone, it will mean "gloomy feeling" or "(clinical) depression."

I think that the action of writing this kanji will make you feel depressed.

Incidentally, the kanji with the second-largest number of strokes is 鑑 (read as 'kan/kagami'), which needs 23 brushstrokes.

鑑 means "example," "model," or "norm."
最も画数の多い漢字

今日は、常用漢字の中で最も画数の多い漢字を紹介します。

それは「鬱」で、29画となります。

「鬱」は、草木が茂っている様子や物事が盛んな様子も表しますが、単体で使った場合は「心が晴れ晴れしないこと」や「うつ病」の意味を表すことが多いです。

「鬱」という字を書くこと自体が、鬱な気分になります。

ちなみに、二番目に画数の多い漢字は「鑑」で、23画となります。

「鑑」は「手本」や「規範」という意味を持ちます。
No. 1 ユリヤ's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 dec's correction
ピポ
“鬱” does mean all of the things listed above. Both of the words listed for the first sense also can be used for the meaning in the second sense. “鬱乎 (ukko)” would be a word which takes the first sense, but I presume it could probably take the second, but it’s not explicitly listed in the copy of the Sanseido Daijirin that I’m using. “鬱勃” does refer to things that are active, but more so in the sense that it is popular. There is another sense that “鬱” can refer to that Toru didn’t mention and that would be to stagnate as in “鬱血 (ukketu)” which refers to vascular congestion (i.e. when a blood vessel becomes congested). I feel this is intrinsically related to the first sence, but it is nice to see it stated somewhere.
Whether or not “鬱” is mostly used in compounds nowadays to refer to being depressed doesn’t change the fact that if it used by itself than it’ll “mean ‘gloomy feeling’ or ‘(clinical) depression.’”

“鑑” can be read as “kagami.” It’s just not in the list of characters for regular use. It is from the same root as “鏡.” It’s just a different glyph for a different sense. The main sense in this case matches what Toru says, but it can also means (badly translated into English) written material that collects materials/data/documents. This describes 図鑑 which is a written material that systematically collects stuff centered around images and diagrams/chart (図). Thus 図鑑 (illustrated reference book) is an illustration-model.

I didn’t mean to ramble that much, but don’t worry because I also enjoy writing the character “鬱,” but a lot of people don’t and prefer to just write “うつ.”
Toru
Thank you so much for the corrections and comments!
And thank you for the explanations, ピポ-san! :)

> I'm not sure about the "things are active" meaning. I can't find any words matching that description, unless you are referring to 鬱勃?

As you said, there are few words containing 鬱 that mean "things are active."
鬱勃 might be the only word which matches the above description. As related words, there are 鬱憤 and 鬱血 (mentioned by ピポ-san).

Shisshō (失笑 - Bursting into Laughter)

Mar 31, 2019 22:19
Shisshō

Have you ever burst into laughter because something was so funny?

Such a laugh is referred to as 'shisshō' (失笑) in Japanese.

'Shi/shitsu' (失) usually means "lose," but here it means "mistake" or "wrong."

In addition, 'shō' (笑) means "laugh," so the literal meaning of 'shisshō' means "a wrong laugh."

However, since 'shitsu' (失) is familiar in the meaning of "lose," many Japanese people believe that 'shisshō' means "a bitter laugh."

According to a survey by the Agency for Cultural Affairs, more than 60% of Japanese people use this word incorrectly.
失笑

何かがおかしくて、こらえきれず笑ってしまったことはありますか?

そのような笑いを、日本語で「失笑」と言います。

「失」は通常 "lose" を意味しますが、ここでは "mistake/wrong" を意味します。

また、「笑」は "laugh" を意味するので、「失笑」での文字どおりの意味は "a wrong laugh" となります。

「失」の意味が "lose" である認識が強いためか、「失笑」の意味を「呆れて笑えない」と勘違いしている日本人がとても多いです。

文化庁のアンケート調査によると、60%以上の日本人がこの言葉を間違えて使っているそうです。
No. 1 Nofoofro's correction
Thank you for teaching us about 失笑 :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
Yes, what I wanted to say is "失 usually means 'lose'."

Misoji (三十路 - Thirty Years Old)

Mar 30, 2019 21:59
Misoji

I was 'misoji' (三十路) last year.

'Misoji' means "thirty years old."

When describing one's age in Japanese, we usually add the word 'sai' (歳 - literally means "age") to the word meaning a number, but there are special expressions for some ages, such as twenty years old and thirty years old.

Twenty years old is called 'hatachi' (二十歳), thirty years old is called 'misoji' (三十路), forty years old called 'yosoji' (四十路), and fifty years old is called 'gosoji' (五十路).

Some people say 'misoji' to mean "thirties," but this usage is wrong.
三十路

私は去年、「三十路」でした。

「三十路」とは、30歳のことです。

日本語で年齢を言う場合、通常は数字に年を表す「歳」をつけますが、20歳や30歳には特別な読み方があります。

20歳は「二十歳(はたち)」、30歳は「三十路(みそじ)」、40歳は「四十路(よそじ)」、50歳は「五十路(ごそじ)」と言います。

「三十路」を「30代」という意味で使う人もいますが、これは間違いです。
No. 1 Ckasper's correction
Very good writing, and informative! I knew about 二十歳, but not the others
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)
No. 2 ピポ's correction
This is one of those things where writing じ as ぢ would make more sense because it shows ち becoming voiced (i.e. ち→ぢ). Also, I’ve only ever heard up to 四十路, so I was suprised to hear that someone would pronounce 五十路 as ごそじ with an On reading of ご instead of something similar to いつ. Indeed, I’ve looked up and found: 五十路(いそ じ), 六十路(むそ じ), 七十路(なな そじ), 八十路(やそ じ), and 九十路(ここのそ じ). Japanese sure is interesting.

この場合には、「じ」の代わりに「ぢ」を書く方がいいと思います。何故なら、「ち→ぢ」という連濁化は明らかになるでしょう。私は四十路まで聞いたことだけがあるから、「五十路」の読み方は、「いつ」の近くの代わりに「ご」という音読みの「ごそじ」だと聞いたとき、びっくりしました。如何にも、「五十路(いそ じ)」「六十路(むそ じ)」「七十路(なな そじ)」「八十路(やそ じ)」「九十路(ここのそ じ)」を調べました。日本語は真面目に面白いですね。

Nagori (なごり - Remnant)

Mar 29, 2019 06:55
Nagori

Today is the last working day at my university.

Now I am feeling 'nagori' (なごり) to this university where I have been working for three years.

'Nagori' means feelings, odors or atomosphere that is left/remains after things pass by.

It is thought that this term was made by shortening 'naminokori' (波残り). (Note that this word is no longer used.)

Since 'nami' (波) means "(sea) wave" and 'nokori' (残り) means "remnant," "leftover" or "residual."

That is to say, 'naminokori' means various things that remain after waves break on a shore.
なごり

今日は、現在の大学の最終勤務日です。

私は3年間働いてきたこの大学に、「名残」を感じています。

「なごり」とは、物事が過ぎ去ったあとに残る、気配や余韻・余情のことです。

この言葉は、「波残り」が省略されてできたものと考えられています。

「波」は "(sea) wave"、「残り」は "leftover" や "residual" を意味します。

すなわち「波残り」は、浜辺に波が打ち寄せた後そこに残る、さまざまなものを意味します。
No. 1 outdoors's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Dowasure (ど忘れ - Lapse of Memory)

Mar 28, 2019 17:11
Dowasure

I often do 'dowasure' (ど忘れ).

'Dowasure' means that you suddenly forget something you know well and simply can't come up with it.

'Wasure' (忘れ) means "to forget," but I think that most Japanese people do not know where 'do' (ど) comes from.

'Do' is written in kanji as 度, and it means "degree" or "dimension."

This term was borne from the Chinese story 韓非子 -- in this story, a man measured his foot dimensions to buy shoes, but he went to a store without the dimension notes.
ど忘れ

私はしばしば「ど忘れ」をします。

「ど忘れ」とは、よく知っているはずの物事を忘れてしまい、思い出せないことを意味します。

「忘れ」は "to forgot" を意味しますが、「ど」の由来を知っている日本人は多くないと思います。

ど忘れの「ど」は漢字で「度」と書き、"degree" や "dimension" を意味します。

この言葉は、中国の故事「韓非子」において、靴を買うため足の寸法(度)を測ったが、その書付けを忘れてお店に行ったという話から生まれました。
No. 1 dec's correction
Toru
Thank you so much always for correcting my post! :)

Suima ni Osowareru (睡魔に襲われる - Getting Sleepy)

Mar 27, 2019 22:23
Suima ni Osowareru

I am very sleepy now.

When you become very drowsy or sleepy, it can be described as 'suima ni osowareru' (睡魔に襲われる) in Japanese.

'Sui' (睡) means "sleep," 'ma' (魔) means "devil," 'osou' (襲う) means "to attak," and 'wareru' (われる) is a passive expression, so the literal meaning of this phrase is "to be attacked by a devil of sleep."

As you can guess, this phrase compares strong sleepiness that is hard to resist to a devil of sleep.
睡魔に襲われる

私は今、とても眠たいです。

激しい眠気を感じることを、「睡魔に襲われる」と表現することがあります。

「睡」は "sleep"、「魔」は "devil"、「襲う」は "to attak"、そして「われる」は受け身表現であるため、「睡魔に襲われる」の文字どおりの意味は "to be attacked by a devil of sleep" となります。

抵抗し難い強い眠気を、魔物にたとえているというわけです。
No. 1 dec's correction
Perfect.

You might like to know that 睡魔 can also be translated as "The Sandman", otherwise known as Morpheus.

There's a very famous comic series called "The Sandman":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sandman_(Vertigo)
https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%82%B5%E3%83%B3%E3%83%89%E3%83%9E%E3%83%B3_(%E3%83%B4%E3%82%A1%E3%83%BC%E3%83%86%E3%82%A3%E3%82%B4)
Toru
Thank you so much for correcting my post and letting me know the new term!
It's really interesting! :)

Saiketsu (採血 - Blood Sampling)

Mar 26, 2019 23:05
Saiketsu

Today I went to a hospital for a health check.

Among the health check, there was 'saiketsu' (採血) that I do not like.

Since 'sai' (採) means "to collect" and 'ketsu' (血) means "blood," the combination 'saiketsu' literally means "to collect blood."

When collecting my blood, the nurse said, "it is very easy to collect blood from your blood vessels."

The reason was that seven vessels for blood collection could be observed clearly.

The nurse also said, "your arm is best for injection practice for novice nurses," but I thought that it was really disgusting.
採血

今日は入社前の健康診断に行きました。

その中で、私の嫌いな「採血」もありました。

「採」は "to collect"、「血」は "blood" を意味するので、「採血」は文字どおり "to collect blood" を意味します。

採血をするとき、看護師さんは私に「とても採血をしやすい血管でありがたいです」と言いました。

採血するための血管が、はっきりと7本浮かび上がっているからだそうです。

「新人の注射練習に最適」とも言われましたが、絶対に嫌だと思いました。
No. 1 Viji's correction
Good luck ! Hope you got the job :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Bon to Shōgatsu ga Issho ni Kita-yō (盆と正月が一緒に来たよう - Very Busy)

Mar 25, 2019 16:48
Bon to Shōgatsu ga Issho ni Kita-yō

I am very busy now because of retirement, entering a new job, and moving.

Such a busyness can be described as 'bon to shōgatsu ga issho ni kita-yō' (盆と正月が一緒に来たよう) in Japanese.

'Bon' (盆) is the Buddhist Festival of ancestral spirits, 'shōgatsu' (正月) means "New Year's holidays," 'issho' (一緒) means "together," and 'kita-yō' (来たよう) means "as if something came," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "as if both Bon and new year came together."

If there were an American version of this, it could be "as if Thanksgiving and Christmas came at the same time."
盆と正月が一緒に来たよう

私は現在、退職、入職、転居などで非常に忙しいです。

このように非常に忙しいことを、「盆と正月が一緒に来たよう」と表現することがあります。

「盆」は "Buddhist Festival of ancestral spirits"、「正月」は "New Year's holidays"、「一緒に」は "together"、「来たよう」は "as if something came" を意味するので、この表現の文字どおりの意味は "as if both Bon and new year came together" となります。

アメリカ版にするなら、「感謝祭とクリスマスが同時に来たよう」となるかもしれません。
No. 1 friendfromfaraway's correction
忙しすぎそうですよね!
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! (^^)

Nizukuri (荷造り - Packing)

Mar 25, 2019 00:55
Nizukuri

Now I am doing 'nizukuri' (荷造り) for moving out of my apartment.

Since 'ni' (荷) means "package" and 'zukuri/tsukuri' (造り) means "to make," the literal meaning of 'nizukuri' is "to make a package."

Actually, this term means to put various things together in a box/bag or tie them together with a string.

In English, it can be translated as "packing."

It is said that packing should be started two weeks before moving, but I started packing a week before moving.

The move will take place after three days, but packing has not finished at all.
荷造り

私は今、「荷造り」をしています。

「荷」は "package"、「造り」は "make" を意味するので、「荷造り」の文字どおりの意味は "to make a package" となります。

実際には、さまざまなものをまとめて箱や袋につめたり、ひもで結んだりすることを意味します。

英語では "packing" と表現されます。

荷造りは引っ越しの2週間前が目安と言われていますが、私は引っ越しの1週間前から始めました。

引っ越しは3日後ですが、まだ全く終わっていません。
No. 1 jeemeegee's correction
Good, and best wishes! :)
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Sudatsu (巣立つ - Leaving a Nest)

Mar 23, 2019 23:56
Sudatsu

In my yesterday's post, I used the Japanese word 'sudatsu' (巣立つ).

Since 'su' (巣) menas "nest" and 'datsu/tatsu' (立つ) means "to stand" or "to fly," the literal meaning of 'sudatsu' is "to fly a nest."

Of course, this word literally can mean that birds' children grow and leave their nests.

However, when using it to people, it means that children leave their parents or graduate from school/university then go into the world.

By using this word, you can emphasize feelings of pathos compare to just saying 'shakaijin ni naru' (社会人になる - literally means "to become a member of society") or 'dokuritsu suru' (独立する - literally means "to become independent").
巣立つ

昨日の投稿の中で、私は「巣立つ」という言葉を使いました。

「巣」は "nest"、「立つ」は "to stand" や "to fly" を意味するので、「巣立つ」の文字どおりの意味は "to fly the nest" となります。

もちろん、「巣立つ」は文字どおり、鳥の子などが成長して巣を去るという意味を持ちます。

しかし、人に対して使った場合は、子どもが親元を離れることや、学校を卒業して社会に出ることを意味する言葉になります。

単に「社会人になる」や「独立する」と言うよりも、哀愁を帯びた感じを出すことができます。
No. 1 dec's correction
There is also an expression in English called "empty nest syndrome." It's not a real (medical) syndrome, though. It describes life for parents whose children have all "flown the nest."
Toru
Thank you so much for the helpful correction again!
And thank you for letting me know that phrase! :)

Megashira ga Atsuku Naru (目頭が熱くなる - One's Eyes Fill with Tears)

Mar 22, 2019 23:49
Megashira ga Atsuku Naru

The day before yesterday, a graduation ceremony took place at my university.

When I saw students who would spread their wings, my eyes filled with tears.

When one's eyes fill with tears like my case, it can be expressed as the Japanese phrase 'megashira ga atsuku naru' (目頭が熱くなる).

'Me' (目) means "eye," 'gashira/kashira' (頭) means "head," and the combination means "inner corner of one's eye."

In addition, 'atsuku naru' (熱くなる) means "to get hot," so the literal meaning of this phrase is "inner corners of one's eyes get hot."

It is thought that it comes from the fact that tears accumulated in your eyes would make you feel warm.
目頭が熱くなる

一昨日は、私の大学の卒業式が行われました。

巣立っていく学生の姿を見ると、私は感動で思わず涙が出そうになりました。

このように、感動で涙が出そうになることを、日本語で「目頭が熱くなる」と言います。

「目」は "eye"、「頭」は "head" を意味し、「目頭」で "inner corner of one's eye" を意味します。

また、「熱くなる」は "to get hot" を意味するので、この慣用句の文字どおりの意味は "inner corners of one's eyes get hot" となります。

涙が目頭に溜まると暖かく感じることに由来すると考えられます。
No. 1 Haritosh's correction
Toru
Thank you so much for the correction! :)

Sihou Happou (四方八方 - Every Direction)

Mar 21, 2019 20:58
Sihou Happou

In my previous post, I introduced the word 'happou' (八方), which means every direction in the surroundings.

Of course, 'happou' itself makes sense, but if you want to emphasize that directions are diverse, you can use the four-character idiom 'sihou happou' (四方八方).

'Shi' (四) means "four," 'ha/hachi' (八) means "eight," 'hou/pou' (方) means "direction," so the literal meaning of this idioms is "four directions and eight directions."

Both 'sihou' (四方) and 'happou' (八方) mean every direction, but in the narrow sense, the former means north, south, east and west, and the latter means northeast, northwest, southeast and northeast in addition to 'sihou'.
四方八方

以前の投稿の中で、周囲のさまざまな方向を表す「八方」という言葉を紹介しました。

もちろん「八方」だけでも意味をなしますが、より周囲のさまざまな方向であることを強調したい場合、「四方八方」と言うこともできます。

「四」は "four"、「八」は "eight"、「方」は "direction" を意味するので、「四方八方」の文字どおりの意味は "four directions and eight directions" となります。

「四方」も「八方」もさまざまな方向を表す言葉ですが、狭義において「四方」は「北」「南」「東」「西」、八方はそこに「北東」「北西」「南東」「南西」を加えた方向のことです。
No. 1 dec's correction